The Silence Of The Lambs


1h 58m 1991
The Silence Of The Lambs

Brief Synopsis

A fledgling FBI agent enlists a psychopath's help in catching a serial killer.

Film Details

Also Known As
Das Schweigen der Lammer, Le Silence des agneaux, När lammen tystnar, Schweigen der Lammer, Das, silence des agneaux, silencio de los corderos, El
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Horror
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Washington, DC, USA; Richmond, Virginia, USA; Prague, Czech Republic; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Montpelier, Virginia, USA; Maryland, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Lithuania; France; Wilmington, North Carolina, USA; Washington, DC, USA; Virginia, USA; Florida, USA; Florence, Italy; DEG Film Studios, North Carolina, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina, USA; Captiva, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Synopsis

In this chilling film, based on the novel by Thomas Harris, a serial killer is terrorizing the Midwest and in an effort to catch him, the FBI sends agent Clarice Darling to interview a prisoner, psychiatrist Dr. Hannibal Lecter, who agrees to give insight into the mind of the on-the-loose criminal. A lingering classic filled with gore, mystery and suspense. Starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins, Lawrence A. Bonney, Kasi Lemmons and Lawrence T. Wrentz.

Crew

Colleen Atwood

Costume Designer

Richard Aversa

Grip

Johann Sebastian Bach

Song

Jeffrey T Barabe

Production Assistant

Donna Belajac

Casting

Dwight Benjamin-creel

Special Effects

Monica Bielawski

Production Assistant

Staci Blagovich

Casting

Andre Blake

Production Assistant

Grace Blake

Production Coordinator

Grace Blake

Associate Producer

Ron Bochar

Editor

David Boulton

Adr

Sharon Boyle

Music Supervisor

Ron Bozman

Producer

Ron Bozman

Assistant Director

Lisa Bradley

Production Assistant

Trish Breganti

Post-Production Assistant

Lisa Bromwell

Associate Editor

Sam Bruskin

Post-Production Assistant

Mark Burchard

Wardrobe Supervisor

Michael J Burke

Electrician

Francine Byrne

Art Department Coordinator

Lynn Cassaniti

Apprentice

Mike Cassidy

Stunts

M Chalkin

Song

Katie Clarke

Accounting Assistant

Nzingha Clarke

Apprentice

Missy Cohen

Sound Editor

C Cole

Song

Randall Coleman

Adr Editor

Kenny Conners

Best Boy

Marko Costanzo

Foley Artist

John Crowder

Location Coordinator

Alan D'angerio

Hair

Ed Decort

Electrician

Peter Demme

Electrician

Sue Demskey

Music

Homer Denison

Music Arranger

Kay Denmark

Adr

Bill Docker

Apprentice

John K Donohue

Dolly Grip

Leanore G Drogin

Animal Wrangler

P Drucker

Song

Russ Engels

Gaffer

Richard Ericson

Consultant

M Erskine

Song

Robin Fajardo

Assistant

Howard Feuer

Casting

Richard Fishwick

Craft Service

Priscilla Fleischman

Post-Production Assistant

Tom Fleischman

Sound

Sean Foyle

Props

Peter Fuchs

Assistant Engineer

Tak Fujimoto

Dp/Cinematographer

Tak Fujimoto

Director Of Photography

Carl Fullerton

Special Makeup Effects

John Fundus

Sound Recordist

Timothy Galvin

Art Director

Eileen Garrigan

Scenic Artist

W Garvey

Song

Kathleen Gerlach

Assistant

Becky Gibbs

Production Assistant

Paul Giorgi

Stage Manager

Gary Goetzman

Executive Producer

Frederika Gray

Scenic Artist

P Hanley

Song

S Hanley

Song

Teri Hanson

Production Assistant

Thomas Harris

Source Material (From Novel)

Gus Holzer

Location Coordinator

Larry Huston

Camera Assistant

Thomas Imperato

Other

Kalina Ivanov

Storyboard Artist

Anthony Jannelli

Camera Operator

Brian Johnson

Assistant Sound Editor

Ross Jones

Electrician

C A Kelly

Wardrobe

Mary A Kelly

Photography

Frank Kern

Foley Editor

David Kirkman

Apprentice Editor

Gary Kosko

Assistant Art Director

Pat Lamagna

Assistant

Q Lazzarus

Song Performer

Gina Leonetti

Assistant Director

Jay Levy

Camera Assistant

Loren Levy

Props

Stuart Levy

Apprentice

G Lewis

Song

B Licher

Song

Skip Lievsay

Sound Designer

Marissa Littlefield

Dialogue Editor

Annie Loeffler

Other

Ed Lohrer

On-Set Dresser

Mick Lohrer

Grip

J Long

Song

Sally Love

Consultant

Bruce Maccallum

Assistant Camera Operator

Dennis Maitland

Boom Operator

Ann Markel

Accounting Assistant

Neal Martz

Special Makeup Effects

Maria Mason

Production Assistant

P Mata

Song

Kyle Mccarthy

Assistant Director

Larry Mcconkey

Steadicam Operator

Michael A Mccue

Other

Craig Mckay

Editor

Kevin Mcleod

Production Assistant

Raymond A Mendez

Animal Wrangler

Christie Miele

Animal Trainer

Ann Miller

Property Master

Billy Miller

Key Grip

Matt Miller

Grip

Doug Murray

Sound Recordist

Chris Newman

Sound

Colin Newman

Song

Colin Newman

Song Performer

Tom O'halloran

Assistant Camera Operator

Karen O'hara

Set Decorator

Walter Oggier

Consultant

Paula Oliver

Production Assistant

David Orr

Color Timer

Brian Osmond

Camera Trainee

T Ottaviano

Song

Paula Payne

Other

Paula Payne

Scenic Artist

Suzana Peric

Music Editor

Marshall Persinger

Post-Production Supervisor

James Petri

Electrician

Tom Petty

Song

Lucas Platt

Assistant

Calvin Price

Grip

Bruce Pross

Foley Editor

Dennis Radesky

Transportation Captain

Ben Ramsey

Production Assistant

Nic Ratner

Music

John E Rawlins

Consultant

Ken Regan

Photography

M Riley

Song

Walt Robles

Stunts

John Robotham

Stunt Coordinator

Vicki Dee Rock

Production Auditor

Steve Rose

Assistant Director

Fred Rosenberg

Dialogue Editor

Andrew Sands

Production Assistant

Anne Sawyer

Assistant Sound Editor

Edward Saxon

Producer

C Scanlon

Song

Steven Shareshian

Accounting Assistant

Colleen Sharp

Assistant Editor

Carl Sheffelman

Storyboard Artist

Alison Sherman

Production Assistant

Howard Shore

Music

Gail Showalter

Adr Editor

M E Smith

Song

Alan Snelling

Music

Sean Squires

Sound Recordist

Jeff Stern

Dialogue Editor

Philip Stockton

Dialogue Editor

Alice Stone

Assistant Editor

Diana Stoughton

Set Decorator

Paul Talkington

Other

Ted Tally

Screenplay

Neri Kyle Tannenbaum

Location Manager

Hartsell Taylor

Wardrobe Supervisor

Valerie Thomas

Assistant

Kenneth Turek

On-Set Dresser

Jane Ulan

Production Assistant

Kenneth Utt

Unit Production Manager

Kenneth Utt

Producer

Steve Visscher

Foley Editor

Robert F Warren

Consultant

Wasler

Production Assistant

Howard Weiner

Video

Allen Weisinger

Makeup

Edward West

On-Set Dresser

Gina White

Production Assistant

Hyle White

Production Assistant

George Wilbur

Stunts

Benjamin Wilson

Wardrobe Assistant

Natalie Wilson

Assistant Art Director

S Bruce Wineinger

Construction Coordinator

Kristi Zea

Production Designer

Jerry Zimmerman

Song Performer

Videos

Movie Clip

Silence Of The Lambs, The (1991) - Somebody Loved Him Examining a victim of the killer Buffalo Bill, trainee agent Starling (Jodie Foster) dictates notes, confers with supervisor Crawford (Scott Glenn), then takes the pupa found in the body to bug scientists (not specified here, but at the Smithsonian, in the Thomas Harris novel) Roden and Pilcher (Dan Butler, Paul Lazar), in The Silence Of The Lambs, 1991.
Silence Of The Lambs, The (1991) - You Have The Power Back at the FBI training center, we learn from TV that the Buffalo Bill victim (Brooke Smith) is the daughter of a U.S. senator (Diane Baker), so Clarice (Jodie Foster) is sent to Dr. Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) with an offer, interrupted by psychiatric ward chief Chilton (Anthony Heald), in The Silence Of The Lambs, 1991.
Silence Of The Lambs, The (1991) - You're Not Real FBI Are You? The famous often-imitated scene by director Jonathan Demme, Jodie Foster as FBI trainee Clarice Starling, supported by Barney (Frankie Faison) and assaulted by Miggs (Stuart Rudin), meets genius serial killer Dr. Hannibal (“the cannibal”) Lecter in his cell, with shocking rude language, from the Thomas Harris novel, early in The Silence Of The Lambs, 1991.
Silence Of The Lambs, The (1991) - He'll Never Stop Having flown into rural West Virginia following the discovery of another victim of the serial killer Buffalo Bill, top FBI profiler Crawford (Scott Glenn) grills his trainee Clarice Starling (Jodie Foster) before they reach a funeral home, meeting a local sheriff (Pat McNamara), stirring her memories, in The Silence Of The Lambs, 1991.
Silence Of The Lambs, The (1991) - You Spook Easily? Shooting on site at the FBI Academy, Quantico, VA, joining director Jonathan Demme’s opening, Jodie Foster in her Academy Award-winning role as trainee agent Clarice Starling is summoned by behavioral science boss Crawford (Scott Glenn), in the Best Picture winner based on the Thomas Harris novel, The Silence Of The Lambs, 1991.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Das Schweigen der Lammer, Le Silence des agneaux, När lammen tystnar, Schweigen der Lammer, Das, silence des agneaux, silencio de los corderos, El
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Horror
Crime
Mystery
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Washington, DC, USA; Richmond, Virginia, USA; Prague, Czech Republic; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Montpelier, Virginia, USA; Maryland, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Lithuania; France; Wilmington, North Carolina, USA; Washington, DC, USA; Virginia, USA; Florida, USA; Florence, Italy; DEG Film Studios, North Carolina, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; Biltmore Estate, Asheville, North Carolina, USA; Captiva, Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Award Wins

Best Actor

1991
Anthony Hopkins

Best Actress

1991
Jodie Foster

Best Adapted Screenplay

1991

Best Director

1991
Jonathan Demme

Best Picture

1991

Award Nominations

Best Editing

1991
Craig Mckay

Best Sound

1991

Articles

The Silence of the Lambs


Ever since movies like Halloween (1978) and The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) sparked a horror-film renaissance in the 1970s, audiences have cheered for the "final girl," the last survivor of a serial killer's mayhem--usually a young woman, stuck with the grim job of subduing the slayer and returning home to tell her story. Of the many offbeat touches in Jonathan Demme's legendary thriller The Silence of the Lambs (1991), none works more effectively than the decision to let the final girl also be the original girl and the only girl, matching her wits against the murderer's from beginning to end.

Not that Clarice Starling is exactly a girl. She's a smart, no-nonsense woman, and she's played by a smart, no-nonsense actress: Jodie Foster, who won an Academy Award for her work. Oscars® also went to Demme for Best Director, Ted Tally for Best Adapted Screenplay, Anthony Hopkins for his chilling performance as Hannibal "The Cannibal" Lecter, and the movie itself as Best Picture of 1991. The film's editing and sound were also nominated. It was almost unprecedented for an R-rated film to sweep the top five Oscars®, and the triumph was taken as a welcome sign that Hollywood was growing up at last-able to embrace a tough, challenging story told in a tough, challenging way.

The first main character we meet is Starling, who's earned a psychology degree and joined the FBI as a trainee. She's assigned to help a senior FBI agent, Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn), track down a serial killer called Buffalo Bill because he skins his (always female) victims as if they were so many bison on the hoof. Crawford's idea is to figure out Buffalo Bill's thought processes with help from Hannibal Lecter, M.D., a former psychiatrist and world-class fiend who's serving life in prison for his crimes. In their first conversation, Starling mentions that serial killers often keep "trophies" from their victims' bodies. Lecter points out that he never did, and Starling stands corrected. "No," she accurately replies, "you ate yours."

Her urgent goal is to locate Buffalo Bill before he kills and flays Catherine Martin, a U.S. senator's daughter who's his latest victim. Starling has about seventy-two hours to accomplish this, since after kidnapping a woman BB keeps her for three days in a home-made dungeon, starving her so her skin will better suit his purpose-which is to tailor himself a "suit" that will enhance his hoped-for transformation into a female version of himself. Lecter can help if he wants to, but he'll do it only on his own psychotic terms.

Starling plunges into the case, assisted by enigmatic clues from Lecter that are almost as mystifying as BB's whereabouts. One of the film's most engrossing elements is the contrast it strikes between two different senses of time, as critic Yvonne Tasker points out in her book on the movie. All the characters are passing through a three-day period that will end with victory for either the FBI or the killer. By contrast, Lecter is already in prison, which frees him from the clock and calendar. He never speaks or moves with undue haste, savoring the suspense he's inflicting on Starling by handing her puzzling hints in exchange for personal information about herself.

Hannibal Lecter was born as a secondary character in the 1981 novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, a former crime and police reporter known for his reclusive personality and meticulous attention to detail; he'll spell out the difficulties of working with disembodied skin, for instance, or the condition of a "floater" corpse eaten away by the water it was dumped into. Red Dragon has been filmed twice-as Manhunter, directed by Michael Mann in 1986, and under the novel's title, with Brett Ratner directing in 2002. Brian Cox plays Lecter in the 1986 picture, oozing the same understated weirdness that Hopkins brings to The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, the sequel directed by Ridley Scott in 2001. French actor Gaspard Ulliel plays him with a more aggressive, less effective kind of menace in Hannibal Rising, the 2007 prequel. More actors may take on Lecter in years to come, but Hopkins will always own the character; it's been that way since the moment we and Starling first saw him behind the cannibal-proof glass that shields Hannibal's jailers from his deadly grasp. This is the role that made Hopkins a full-blown star, and deservedly so.

The Silence of the Lambs performed well at the box office, becoming the last hit released by Orion Pictures before the company went into bankruptcy the following year. The film's popularity, due in part to the superb cast and crew, may also have been boosted by real-life associations that audiences brought to it. Many moviegoers remembered that would-be assassin John Hinckley said he tried to kill President Ronald Reagan in 1981 as a way of getting Jodie Foster's attention after he saw Taxi Driver (1976) umpteen times; and the real serial killer Ted Bundy wore a cast on his arm to appear harmless, just as Buffalo Bill does on screen.

Not everyone hailed The Silence of the Lambs. It sparked controversy in the gay community for portraying Buffalo Bill as a wannabe transsexual with stereotypical gay mannerisms, and some reviewers found it too violent. Chicago critic Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote that "the purposes to which it places its considerable ingenuity are ultimately rather foul....For creepy, sicko kicks, I'd rather watch the evening news." By contrast, many feminist critics praised it as "a slasher film in which the woman is hero rather than victim, pursuer rather than pursued," in Amy Taubin's words.

One of the factors that put Harris's novel onto bestseller lists was the careful, almost affectionate precision he uses to bring horrific scenes alive. Drawing on research with the FBI and painstaking study of real serial-killer cases, he lends even the goriest matters a morbid fascination that's hard to shake. Demme provides a movie equivalent via gruesome crime-scene photos, graphic filming of a blood-drenched jailbreak scene, and lots of ghoulish dialogue. "A census taker once tried to test me," Lecter tells Clarice in one of his jovial moods. "I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti." Lines like this passed instantly into the pop-culture hall of fame, helping the movie become a classic of its genre as well as an Oscar®-winning hit.

It also did a lot for Demme, previously known as an art-minded director (Melvin and Howard [1980], Stop Making Sense [1984], Swimming to Cambodia [1987]) with a liking for quirky subjects and performances. The Silence of the Lambs made him a major Hollywood auteur, and remains the defining work of his career. Foster and Hopkins have also reaped great rewards from its success. Whatever they might accomplish in the future, the may never outdo their unique achievements in this remarkable thriller.

Producers: Ron Bozman, Edward Saxon, Kenneth Utt
Director: Jonathan Demme
Screenplay: Ted Tally, based on Thomas Harris novel
Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto
Film editing: Craig McKay
Art direction: Tim Galvin
Production design: Kristi Zea
Music: Howard Shore
Cast: Jodie Foster (Clarice Starling), Anthony Hopkins (Dr. Hannibal Lecter), Scott Glenn (Jack Crawford), Anthony Heald (Dr. Frederick Chilton), Ted Levine (Jame "Buffalo Bill" Gumb), Frankie Faison (Barney Matthews), Kasi Lemmons (Ardelia Mapp), Brooke Smith (Catherine Martin), Diane Baker (Sen. Ruth Martin), Roger Corman (FBI Director Hayden Burke), Ron Vawter (Paul Krendler).
C-118m. Letterboxed.

by Mikita Brottman and David Sterritt
The Silence Of The Lambs

The Silence of the Lambs

Ever since movies like Halloween (1978) and The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) sparked a horror-film renaissance in the 1970s, audiences have cheered for the "final girl," the last survivor of a serial killer's mayhem--usually a young woman, stuck with the grim job of subduing the slayer and returning home to tell her story. Of the many offbeat touches in Jonathan Demme's legendary thriller The Silence of the Lambs (1991), none works more effectively than the decision to let the final girl also be the original girl and the only girl, matching her wits against the murderer's from beginning to end. Not that Clarice Starling is exactly a girl. She's a smart, no-nonsense woman, and she's played by a smart, no-nonsense actress: Jodie Foster, who won an Academy Award for her work. Oscars® also went to Demme for Best Director, Ted Tally for Best Adapted Screenplay, Anthony Hopkins for his chilling performance as Hannibal "The Cannibal" Lecter, and the movie itself as Best Picture of 1991. The film's editing and sound were also nominated. It was almost unprecedented for an R-rated film to sweep the top five Oscars®, and the triumph was taken as a welcome sign that Hollywood was growing up at last-able to embrace a tough, challenging story told in a tough, challenging way. The first main character we meet is Starling, who's earned a psychology degree and joined the FBI as a trainee. She's assigned to help a senior FBI agent, Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn), track down a serial killer called Buffalo Bill because he skins his (always female) victims as if they were so many bison on the hoof. Crawford's idea is to figure out Buffalo Bill's thought processes with help from Hannibal Lecter, M.D., a former psychiatrist and world-class fiend who's serving life in prison for his crimes. In their first conversation, Starling mentions that serial killers often keep "trophies" from their victims' bodies. Lecter points out that he never did, and Starling stands corrected. "No," she accurately replies, "you ate yours." Her urgent goal is to locate Buffalo Bill before he kills and flays Catherine Martin, a U.S. senator's daughter who's his latest victim. Starling has about seventy-two hours to accomplish this, since after kidnapping a woman BB keeps her for three days in a home-made dungeon, starving her so her skin will better suit his purpose-which is to tailor himself a "suit" that will enhance his hoped-for transformation into a female version of himself. Lecter can help if he wants to, but he'll do it only on his own psychotic terms. Starling plunges into the case, assisted by enigmatic clues from Lecter that are almost as mystifying as BB's whereabouts. One of the film's most engrossing elements is the contrast it strikes between two different senses of time, as critic Yvonne Tasker points out in her book on the movie. All the characters are passing through a three-day period that will end with victory for either the FBI or the killer. By contrast, Lecter is already in prison, which frees him from the clock and calendar. He never speaks or moves with undue haste, savoring the suspense he's inflicting on Starling by handing her puzzling hints in exchange for personal information about herself. Hannibal Lecter was born as a secondary character in the 1981 novel Red Dragon by Thomas Harris, a former crime and police reporter known for his reclusive personality and meticulous attention to detail; he'll spell out the difficulties of working with disembodied skin, for instance, or the condition of a "floater" corpse eaten away by the water it was dumped into. Red Dragon has been filmed twice-as Manhunter, directed by Michael Mann in 1986, and under the novel's title, with Brett Ratner directing in 2002. Brian Cox plays Lecter in the 1986 picture, oozing the same understated weirdness that Hopkins brings to The Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal, the sequel directed by Ridley Scott in 2001. French actor Gaspard Ulliel plays him with a more aggressive, less effective kind of menace in Hannibal Rising, the 2007 prequel. More actors may take on Lecter in years to come, but Hopkins will always own the character; it's been that way since the moment we and Starling first saw him behind the cannibal-proof glass that shields Hannibal's jailers from his deadly grasp. This is the role that made Hopkins a full-blown star, and deservedly so. The Silence of the Lambs performed well at the box office, becoming the last hit released by Orion Pictures before the company went into bankruptcy the following year. The film's popularity, due in part to the superb cast and crew, may also have been boosted by real-life associations that audiences brought to it. Many moviegoers remembered that would-be assassin John Hinckley said he tried to kill President Ronald Reagan in 1981 as a way of getting Jodie Foster's attention after he saw Taxi Driver (1976) umpteen times; and the real serial killer Ted Bundy wore a cast on his arm to appear harmless, just as Buffalo Bill does on screen. Not everyone hailed The Silence of the Lambs. It sparked controversy in the gay community for portraying Buffalo Bill as a wannabe transsexual with stereotypical gay mannerisms, and some reviewers found it too violent. Chicago critic Jonathan Rosenbaum wrote that "the purposes to which it places its considerable ingenuity are ultimately rather foul....For creepy, sicko kicks, I'd rather watch the evening news." By contrast, many feminist critics praised it as "a slasher film in which the woman is hero rather than victim, pursuer rather than pursued," in Amy Taubin's words. One of the factors that put Harris's novel onto bestseller lists was the careful, almost affectionate precision he uses to bring horrific scenes alive. Drawing on research with the FBI and painstaking study of real serial-killer cases, he lends even the goriest matters a morbid fascination that's hard to shake. Demme provides a movie equivalent via gruesome crime-scene photos, graphic filming of a blood-drenched jailbreak scene, and lots of ghoulish dialogue. "A census taker once tried to test me," Lecter tells Clarice in one of his jovial moods. "I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti." Lines like this passed instantly into the pop-culture hall of fame, helping the movie become a classic of its genre as well as an Oscar®-winning hit. It also did a lot for Demme, previously known as an art-minded director (Melvin and Howard [1980], Stop Making Sense [1984], Swimming to Cambodia [1987]) with a liking for quirky subjects and performances. The Silence of the Lambs made him a major Hollywood auteur, and remains the defining work of his career. Foster and Hopkins have also reaped great rewards from its success. Whatever they might accomplish in the future, the may never outdo their unique achievements in this remarkable thriller. Producers: Ron Bozman, Edward Saxon, Kenneth Utt Director: Jonathan Demme Screenplay: Ted Tally, based on Thomas Harris novel Cinematography: Tak Fujimoto Film editing: Craig McKay Art direction: Tim Galvin Production design: Kristi Zea Music: Howard Shore Cast: Jodie Foster (Clarice Starling), Anthony Hopkins (Dr. Hannibal Lecter), Scott Glenn (Jack Crawford), Anthony Heald (Dr. Frederick Chilton), Ted Levine (Jame "Buffalo Bill" Gumb), Frankie Faison (Barney Matthews), Kasi Lemmons (Ardelia Mapp), Brooke Smith (Catherine Martin), Diane Baker (Sen. Ruth Martin), Roger Corman (FBI Director Hayden Burke), Ron Vawter (Paul Krendler). C-118m. Letterboxed. by Mikita Brottman and David Sterritt

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Jonathan Demme won the Directors Guild of America's 1991 Outstanding Directorial Achievement Award.

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1991) by the National Board of Review. Also cited for Best Director and Best Supporting Actor (Anthony Hopkins).

Voted Best Picture of the Year (1991) by the New York Film Critics Circle. Also cited for Best Director, Best Actress (Jodie Foster), and Best Actor (Anthony Hopkins).

Released in United States Winter February 14, 1991

Re-released in United States April 3, 1992

Released in United States on Video October 24, 1991

Released in United States January 30, 1991

Released in United States February 1991

Released in United States February 1, 1991

Released in United States February 3, 1991

Released in United States February 4, 1991

Released in United States February 11, 1991

Released in United States March 1998

Shown at benefit premiere for the National Center For Missing and Exploited Children, Chicago January 30, 1991.

Shown at benefit premiere for the Wooster Group, New York City January 30, 1991.

Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 15-26, 1991.

Shown at benefit premiere for the AIDS Project, Los Angeles February 1, 1991.

Shown at benefit premiere for the Pet Animal Welfare Group (PAWS), Westport CT February 3, 1991.

Shown at benefit premiere for the AIDS Foundation/Project Open Hand, San Francisco February 4, 1991.

Shown at benefit premiere for Chicago's Remains Theater, Chicago February 11, 1991.

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 5-15, 1998.

Named best picture of 1991 by the Boston Society of Film Critics. In addition, Jonathan Demme was named best director, Anthony Hopkins was named best supporting actor, and Tak Fujimoto was cited for best cinematography.

Project was originally optioned by Gene Hackman, with the actor set to direct and star.

Jodie Foster received a Golden Globe for Best Actress (Drama) from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (1991).

Began shooting November 15, 1989.

Completed shooting March 1, 1990.

Film is dedicated to Trey Wilson.

Released in United States Winter February 14, 1991

Re-released in United States April 3, 1992

Released in United States on Video October 24, 1991

Released in United States January 30, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere for the National Center For Missing and Exploited Children, Chicago January 30, 1991.)

Released in United States January 30, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere for the Wooster Group, New York City January 30, 1991.)

Released in United States February 1991 (Shown at Berlin Film Festival (in competition) February 15-26, 1991.)

Released in United States February 1, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere for the AIDS Project, Los Angeles February 1, 1991.)

Released in United States February 3, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere for the Pet Animal Welfare Group (PAWS), Westport CT February 3, 1991.)

Released in United States February 4, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere for the AIDS Foundation/Project Open Hand, San Francisco February 4, 1991.)

Released in United States February 11, 1991 (Shown at benefit premiere for Chicago's Remains Theater, Chicago February 11, 1991.)

Released in United States March 1998 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival March 5-15, 1998.)

Nominated for a 1992 French Cesar for Best Foreign Language Film.