Natural Born Killers


2h 1994

Brief Synopsis

A pair of psychotic serial killers become media darlings in Oliver Stone's unique and controversial crime satire "Natural Born Killers: The Director's Cut" (1994). Young lovers Mickey and Mallory launch a gore-soaked killing spree strictly for kicks, and the media eat it up. With strange cameos, gallows humor and violence unlike anything else that ever hit the screen. From an insane screenplay by Quentin Tarantino and starring Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis and Tom Sizemore.

Film Details

Also Known As
Tueurs nés
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Crime
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Stateville Correctional Center, Illinois, USA; Arizona, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Synopsis

A pair of psychotic serial killers become media darlings in Oliver Stone's unique and controversial crime satire "Natural Born Killers: The Director's Cut" (1994). Young lovers Mickey and Mallory launch a gore-soaked killing spree strictly for kicks, and the media eat it up. With strange cameos, gallows humor and violence unlike anything else that ever hit the screen. From an insane screenplay by Quentin Tarantino and starring Woody Harrelson, Juliette Lewis and Tom Sizemore.

Crew

Barry Adamson

Song

Barry Adamson

Song Performer

Jane Alderman

Casting

Alan Allinger

Other

Rodney Armanino

Construction Coordinator

Erica Arvold

Casting

James Ashwill

Foley Mixer

Jacolyn J Baker

Location Manager

Sidney R. Baldwin

Photography

Paul Barker

Song

Jeff Barry

Song

Robert Batha

Sound Editor

Gregg Baxter

Adr Supervisor

Lon Bender

Audio

Brian Berdan

Editor

Brian Berdan

Song

Brian Berdan

Song Performer

Alban Berg

Song

Elmer Bernstein

Music

Steven Jesse Bernstein

Theme Lyrics

Steven Jesse Bernstein

Other

Walter Berry

Soloist

Tom Berto

Animal Wrangler

Jello Biafra

Song

Tana Bishop

Art Department Coordinator

Troy Borisy

Other

Merideth Boswell

Set Decorator

Pierre Boulez

Song Performer

Steve Bowerman

Boom Operator

Russel Bradley

Song

Risa Bramon Garcia

Associate Producer

Risa Bramon Garcia

Casting

Anglea H Brice

Other

Mark Bridges

Assistant Costume Designer

David Bridie

Song

Daniel Brizendine

Transportation Captain

Bill Brown

Post-Production Supervisor

Paul Buff

Song

K Buhlert

Song

Charles R Bunn

Assistant

Ian Calip

Assistant

Robert Carlson

Other

Budd Carr

Music Producer

Chris Centrella

Key Grip

Sergio Cervetti

Music Composer

Calvin Chin

Other

Peter R Chittell

Transportation Captain

Daniel Chuba

Visual Effects

Eden Clark-coblenz

Costumes

Patsy Cline

Song Performer

Cissie Cobb

Song

Leonard Cohen

Song Performer

Leonard Cohen

Song

Mindy Cole

Assistant

Tim Cole

Song

Otis Conner

Song

Pj Connolly

Assistant

Keith Cooper

Special Thanks To

Cydney Cornell

Hairdresser

Hank Corwin

Editor

John Cucci

Foley Artist

J Dammers

Song

Bill Darrow

Other

Mack David

Song

Zack De La Rocha

Theme Lyrics

Richard Deangelo

Other

Snoop Dogg

Song

Julia Dole

Assistant Editor

Amy Dunn

Music

Dale Dye

Technical Advisor

Bob Dylan

Song

Duane Eddy

Song

Duane Eddy

Song Performer

Mona Elliott

Song

Victor Ennis

Assistant Sound Editor

Leonard Eto

Song

Howard Fabrick

Special Thanks To

Tom Fleischman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Glenn Forbes

Assistant Property Master

Larry Fuentes

Special Effects Foreman

Stella Furner

Set Designer

Peter Gabriel

Song

Peter Gabriel

Song Performer

Herb Gains

Assistant Director

Yolande Geralds

Set Production Assistant

Richard Gibbs

Song

Richard Gibbs

Music Conductor

Alex Gibson

Music Editor

Scott Gillis

Key Grip

Leslie Godfrey

Other

Salvador A Godinez

Special Thanks To

Paul Golden

Animator

John P. Goldsmith

Set Designer

Wayne Goldwyn

Photography

Robert Gordon

Song Performer

Ellie Greenwich

Song

Scott Grusin

Song Performer

Scott Grusin

Song

Quincy Gunderson

Assistant Editor

Tom Hajdu

Song

Tom Hajdu

Song Performer

Jane Hamsher

Producer

Richard Hardy

Song Performer

Dale Haugo

Scenic Artist

Screamin' Jay Hawkins

Song

Lee Hazlewood

Song

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Debra Hill

Accounting Assistant

Wendell A Hill

Carpenter

Rose Hlaing

Other

Pamela Hochshartner

Production Coordinator

Ronnie Hollis

Other

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Deirdre Horgan

Script Supervisor

Richard Hornung

Costume Designer

Arliss Howard

Other

Nicholas Irwin

Post-Production Accountant

Anne Iverson

Special Thanks To

John E Jackson

Makeup Artist

Sally Jackson

Other

Craig Jaeger

Foley Editor

Al Jourgensen

Song

Carlton Kaller

Music Editor

Marty Kassab

Video Assist/Playback

Peter Kater

Song Performer

Peter Kater

Song

Lenny Kaye

Song

Randy Kelley

Sound Effects Editor

John A. Kelly

Other

Victor Kempster

Production Designer

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan

Song Performer

Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan

Song

Mikella Kievman

Casting Associate

Dean M King

Dolly Grip

Pee Wee King

Song

James J Klekowski

Other

Phil Krone

Special Thanks To

Braden Kuhlman

Other

Michelle Kurpaska

Costume Supervisor

Mark Lanza

Sound Effects Editor

Diana Latham

Other

Christine Lee

Assistant Editor

Peter J Lehman

Sound Effects Editor

Jay Lehrfeld

Assistant Location Manager

Todd Lent

Assistant

Heidi Levitt

Casting

Brent Lewis

Song

Brent Lewis

Song Performer

Juliette Lewis

Song Performer

Rick Little

Wrangler

F Lovsky

Song

Steve Luport

Special Effects

Brett Mabry

Electrician

David Macmillan

Sound Mixer

Ed Maloney

Lighting

Arthur Manson

Advisor

Marilyn Manson

Song

Marilyn Manson

Song Performer

Rebecca Marie

Visual Effects Supervisor

Joe Mayer

Adr Editor

Amie Frances Mccarthy-winn

Props Assistant

Chris Mcgregor

Song Performer

Chris Mcgregor

Song

Rowan Mckinnon

Song

Russell Means

Song

Russell Means

Song Performer

Christopher Medak

Set Production Assistant

Michael A Mendez

Best Boy Grip

Leo Meyer

Special Thanks To

Arnon Milchan

Executive Producer

Lauren Miller

Casting Associate

Christian Minkler

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Michael Minkler

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Bob Montgomery

Song

Cee Moravec

Assistant

Philip D. Morrill

Assistant Sound Editor

George Morton

Song

Thom Mount

Executive Producer

Matthew W. Mungle

Makeup

Don Murphy

Producer

Sue Schnulle Murphy

Accounting Assistant

Modest Mussorgsky

Music

R Carlos Nakai

Song Performer

R Carlos Nakai

Song

Dean Nakano

Special Thanks To

Phil Neilson

Stunt Coordinator

Sylvia Nestor

Music Supervisor

Carole Nix

Assistant Production Coordinator

Ayal Noar

Song

Thomas J Nordberg

Assistant Editor

Dan O'connell

Foley Artist

Denise Okimoto

Music

Alex Olivares

Effects Coordinator

Remmy Ongala

Song

Carl Orff

Song

Marc Orleans

Song

David Orr

Color Timer

Roger Osbourne

Song

Kelly Oxford

Editor

Billy Page

Song

Film Details

Also Known As
Tueurs nés
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Drama
Action
Crime
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Stateville Correctional Center, Illinois, USA; Arizona, USA; Chicago, Illinois, USA; New Mexico, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h

Articles

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)


Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82.

He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy.

His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno.

Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star.

His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world.

His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this.

He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie.

by Michael T. Toole
Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, (1921-2004)

Rodney Dangerfield, the bug-eyed comedian and actor, who gained fame for his self-deprecating one-liners (i.e. "When I was born, I was so ugly that the doctor slapped my mother!", "I called the suicide hotline and they put me on hold!") and signature catch phrase "I don't get no respect!" died on October 4 at the UCLA Medical Center. He had lapsed into a coma after undergoing heart surgery this past August. He was 82. He was born Jacob Cohen in Babylon, Long Island, New York on November 22, 1921. His father was a vaudevillian performer who played professionally as Phil Roy. Known as something of a cut-up in high school, he started performing comedy when he was 20, and spent the next 10 years working alongthe Atlantic coast under the name Jack Roy. His career was temporarily sidelined with family responsiblities - he married Joyce Indig in 1949 and she soon gave birth to two children: Brian and Melanie. With a family to support, he sold aluminum siding and lived in New Jersey, yet still held onto his dream of being a stand-up comic. In 1961, he divorced his wife (by all accounts his marriage had been an unhappy one), and he hit the road again as Rodney Dangerfield. By the mid-60s, Rondey was hitting his stride, following a some successful nightclub appearances in Manhattan and Atlantic City. At this point, he had developed his stage persona as a harassed schmo, always tugging at his tie and padding down his sweated brow. His persistancy paid off when he made his first television appearances in 1967: The Ed Sullivan Show and The Merv Griffin Show both raised his profile, but what really made Rodney was his July 29, 1969 debut on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. With his flurry of one-liners, goggle eyes and, of course, "I don't get no respect!" plea, audiences loved him and Rodney would make over 70 appearances over the next 30 years on The Tonight Show for both Johnny and eventual host, Jay Leno. Around this time, Rodney garnered his first film role, as an irritable theater manager in The Projectionist (1971), but he would have to wait almost 10 years later before he struck box-office gold. The film was Caddyshack (1980), and as Al Czervik, the loudly dressed, obnoxious but lovable millionaire who crashes a snotty Golf Club, Rodney may not have displayed great acting skills, but his comic personality was vibrant and engaging, and with the comedy being one of the biggest hits of the year, he was now a star. His follow-up to Caddyshack, Easy Money (1983), followed the same formula (he played a baby photgrapher who inherits money), but the tone was much nastier, and the crirtics panned it. He rebounded though with the biggest hit of his career, Back to School (1986). The plot was simple, a self-made millionaire goes back to college to prove his son his worth only to fall in love in the process, grossed over $100 million. Indeed, it looked like Rodney Dangerfield had all the respect in the world. His career kept taking surprise turns in the '90s: he was an in-demand "guest voice" on such animated projects like Rover Dangerfield, The Simpsons, and Dr. Katz, Professional Therapist. Yet, the biggest surprise by far was his dramatic turn as an abusive, alcoholic father in Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers (1994). For his performance, he received glowing reviews, but ill-health was becoming an issue for him, and Rodney had to curtail his schedule considerably after this. He returned to the screen as the Devil in the Adam Sandler comedy Little Nicky (2000), but on his 80th birthday (November 22, 2001), he suffered a mild heart attack, and in the Spring of 2003, he underwent brain surgery to improve his blood flow in preparation for an upcoming heart-valve replacement surgery. This year started off brightly for him: he made another film appearance, Angles with Angles; released his autobiography in May entitled It Ain't Easy Being Me and in just the past two months appeared on television for Jimmy Kimmel Live, and in an episode of the CBS sitcom Still Standing playing a wisecracking, next-door neighbor. Sadly, this flurry of reactivity was not to last. On August 24, he entered UCLA Medical Center for heart valve-replacement surgery, but complications from an infection after the operation led to a coma, and he reamined in vegetative state for the last six weeks of his life. He is survived by his wife of 11 years, Joan Child; his son, Brian; and daughter, Melanie. by Michael T. Toole

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)


Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82.

Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer.

Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954).

Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music.

After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969).

His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

Elmer Bernstein (1922-2004)

Elmer Bernstein, the film composer who created unforgettable music for such classics as The Magnificent Seven, To Kill a Mockingbird, and won his only Academy Award for Thoroughly Modern Millie, died of natural causes at his Ojai, California home on August 17. He was 82. Elmer Bernstein, who was not related to Leonard Bernstein, was born on August 4, 1922, in New York City. He displayed a talent in music at a very young age, and was given a scholarship to study piano at Juilliard when he was only 12. He entered New York University in 1939, where he majored in music education. After graduating in 1942, he joined the Army Air Corps, where he remained throughout World War II, mostly working on scores for propaganda films. It was around this time he became interested in film scoring when he went to see William Dieterle's The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941), a film whose score was composed by Bernard Herrmann, a man Bernstein idolized as the ideal film composer. Bernstein, who originally intended to be a concert pianist and gave several performances in New York after being discharged from military service, decided to relocate to Hollywood in 1950. He did his first score for the football film Saturday's Hero (1950), and then proved his worth with his trenchant, moody music for the Joan Crawford vehicle Sudden Fear (1952). Rumors of his "communist" leanings came to surface at this time, and, feeling the effects of the blacklist, he found himself scoring such cheesy fare as Robot Monster; Cat Women of the Moon (both 1953); and Miss Robin Caruso (1954). Despite his politics, Otto Preminger hired him to do the music for The Man With the Golden Arm, (1955) in which Frank Sinatra played a heroin-addicted jazz musician. Fittingly, Bernstein used some memorable jazz motifs for the film and his fine scoring put him back on the map. It prompted the attention of Cecil B. De Mille, who had Bernstein replace the ailing Victor Young on The Ten Commandments (1956). His thundering, heavily orchestrated score perfectly suite the bombastic epic, and he promptly earned his first Oscar® nod for music. After The Ten Commandments (1956), Bernstein continued to distinguish himself in a row of fine films: The Rainmaker (1956), Sweet Smell of Success (1957), Some Came Running (1958), The Magnificent Seven (a most memorable galloping march, 1960); To Kill a Mockingbird (unique in its use of single piano notes and haunting use of a flute, 1962); Hud (1963); earned a deserved Academy Award for the delightful, "flapper" music for the Julie Andrews period comedy Thoroughly Modern Mille (1967), and True Grit (1969). His career faltered by the '80s though, as he did some routine Bill Murray comedies: Meatballs (1980) and Stripes (1981). But then director John Landis had Bernstein write the sumptuous score for his comedy Trading Places (1983), and Bernstein soon found himself back in the game. He then graced the silver screen for a few more years composing some terrific pieces for such popular commercial hits as My Left Foot (1989), A River Runs Through It (1992) and The Age of Innocence (1993). Far From Heaven, his final feature film score, received an Oscar® nomination for Best Score in 2002. He is survived by his wife, Eve; sons Peter and Gregory; daughters Emilie and Elizabeth; and five grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 1994 Golden Reel Award by the Motion Picture Sound Editors.

Winner of the Special Jury Prize at the 1994 Venice Film Festival.

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States December 1997

Released in United States on Video February 14, 1995

Released in United States September 1994

Released in United States Summer August 26, 1994

Re-released in United States on Video July 30, 1996

Shown at Cairo International Film Festival (closing night) November 28 - December 11, 1994.

Shown at Cairo International Film Festival December 1-14, 1997.

Shown at Montreal World Film Festival (opening night) August 25 - September 5, 1994.

Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival September 15-24, 1994.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (in competition) September 1-12, 1994.

Film was banned in Ireland on October 26th, 1994, by film censor Sheamus Smith. On Thursday, October 27th, Warner Bros. postponed the film's scheduled November 18th UK release because the British Board of Film Classification refused to give it a certificate. The film subsequently received an age-18 certificate.

According to the production notes for "Reservoir Dogs" (USA/1992), Quentin Tarantino's screenplay for "Natural Born Killers" was his second effort.

Began shooting May 24, 1993.

Completed shooting July 31, 1993.

Released in United States 1994 (Shown at Cairo International Film Festival (closing night) November 28 - December 11, 1994.)

Released in United States 1994 (Shown at Montreal World Film Festival (opening night) August 25 - September 5, 1994.)

Released in United States on Video February 14, 1995

Re-released in United States on Video July 30, 1996 (director's cut)

Released in United States Summer August 26, 1994

Released in United States September 1994 (Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival September 15-24, 1994.)

Released in United States September 1994 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (in competition) September 1-12, 1994.)

Released in United States December 1997 (Shown at Cairo International Film Festival December 1-14, 1997.)