National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation


1h 37m 1989

Brief Synopsis

Unexpected guests and a run of bad luck turn Christmas into a season in hell.

Film Details

Also Known As
Christmas Vacation, Ett päron till farsa firar jul, National Lampoon's Winter Holiday, sapin a les boules
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Holiday
Sequel
Release Date
1989
Production Company
John Agalsoff
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Silverthorne, Colorado, USA; Breckenridge, Colorado, USA; Frisco, Colorado, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Third in the "National Lampoon" series about the Griswold family. In this sequel, the Griswolds must deal with a holiday with their in-laws.

Crew

Thomas Ackerman

Director Of Photography

Thomas Ackerman

Dp/Cinematographer

Barbara Adamski

Property Master

Ellen Adolph

Production Accountant

Greg Agalsoff

Boom Operator

John Agalsoff

Cable Operator

Jim Alexander

Sound Mixer

Michael Amorelli

Chief Lighting Technician

Alex Anderson

Song

George H Anderson

Sound Editor

Craig Asato

Assistant Camera

Gene Autry

Song

Gene Autry

Song Performer

Angelo Badalamenti

Music

Angelo Badalamenti

Original Music

David Baldwin

Sound Editor

Gregory J Barnett

Stunts

Andy Barrett

Original Music

Bill Beasley

Associate Producer

Bill Beasley

Unit Production Manager

Matt Earl Beesley

Assistant Director

Juel Bestrop

Casting Assistant

Katherine E Beyda

Assistant

Kim Loren Bodner

Production

Lisa Boss

Production

Janet Brady

Stunts

Risa Bramon Garcia

Casting

Charles John Bukey

Best Boy Grip

Neal Burger

Sound Editor

William H Burton

Stunts

Tom Busch

Location Manager

Kathryn Camp

Assistant Editor

Frank Capra

Assistant Director

Ray Charles

Song Performer

Chris Ciaffa

Production

Richmond G Cogswell

Video Assist/Playback

Glen Cooper

Painter

Erik Cord

Stunts

Bing Crosby

Song Performer

Parnell Davidson

Song

Tim A Davison

Stunts

Bryan Denegal

Assistant Director

Craig Dietrich

Production

Annie Ellis

Stunts

Eric Engler

Dp/Cinematographer

Eric Engler

Director Of Photography

Jeannie Epper

Stunts

Lisa Fischer

Set Decorator

Harvey Fuqua

Song

Kenneth J Gagnon

Construction Coordinator

Mauri Syd Gayton

Associate Producer

Joe Gilbert

Adr Editor

Stan Gilbert

Adr Editor

Sandra Gimpel

Stunts

Mavis Girard

Script Supervisor

Jerry Greenberg

Editor

Mari Grimaud

Costume Supervisor

Oakley Haldeman

Song

Allen L Hall

Special Effects

Bill Hansard

Projectionist

Lee Harman

Makeup Artist

Jim Harrison

Music Editor

Scott E Hart

Animal Services

Gary Hecker

Foley Artist

Dan Hegeman

Sound Editor

D. M. Hemphill

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Chris Hilsabeck

Production

Billy Hopkins

Casting

John Hughes

Screenplay

John Hughes

Producer

Tom Jacobson

Producer

Chris Jenkins

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Eric Jewett

Assistant Director

Mable John

Song

Christie Johnston

Production Associate

Harold Jones

Stunts

Michael Kaplan

Costume Designer

Gary L Karas

Special Effects

Kevin Kelly

Chief Lighting Technician

Steve Kelso

Stunts

Larry Kemp

Supervising Sound Editor

Justin Klarenbeck

Visual Effects

Lou Kleinman

Sound Editor

Doug Knapp

Camera Operator

Vicki Lemay-jackson

Assistant Director

Heidi Levitt

Casting

Bill Macintosh

Stunts

Barry Mann

Song

Eddie Marks

Costume Supervisor

Johnny Marks

Song

Dan Marrow

Transportation Coordinator

Stephen Marsh

Production Designer

David K Mccullough

Visual Effects

John C. Meier

Stunts

Carlyn Montes De Oca

Assistant Editor

Glenn T Morgan

Sound Editor

Beala B Neel

Art Director

David P Newell

Assistant Property Master

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

David Parrish

Assistant Camera

Ron Payne

Music Supervisor

Ron Phillips

Photography

Charles Picerni

Unit Director

Steve Picerni

Stunts

Neil David Pontecorvo

Greensman

Kaye Pownall

Hair Stylist

Phil Ramano

Stunts

Chad Randall

Stunts

Shirley Randles

Craft Service

Richard Rankin

Construction Coordinator

Ted Rhodes

Key Grip

Scott M. Robinson

Key Grip

John Robotham

Stunts

Charles Samek

Original Music

Victoria Rose Sampson

Sound Editor

William M Silic

Chief Lighting Technician

Matty Simmons

Executive Producer

Mark Smith

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Mavis Staples

Song Performer

Wylie Stateman

Supervising Sound Editor

Edward Steidele

Foley Artist

Michael A Stevenson

Editor

Mark P. Stoeckinger

Sound Editor

Tama Takahashi

Assistant Camera

The Moonglows

Song Performer

Angel Trujello

Caterer

Gaston Veilleux

Transportation Captain

John L Wagner

Assistant Camera

Ramey E Ward

Associate Producer

Gary Wasserman

Music Editor

Joel Webster

Song

Cynthia Weil

Song

Kirsten Whittier Welles

Assistant

Cheryl M Wheeler

Stunts

Scott Wilder

Stunts

Kurt Young

Dolly Grip

Dick Ziker

Stunts

Film Details

Also Known As
Christmas Vacation, Ett päron till farsa firar jul, National Lampoon's Winter Holiday, sapin a les boules
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Comedy
Holiday
Sequel
Release Date
1989
Production Company
John Agalsoff
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures International (WBI)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; Silverthorne, Colorado, USA; Breckenridge, Colorado, USA; Frisco, Colorado, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation


The third feature in National Lampoon's film franchise about the Griswold family, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation arrived at cinemas in 1989 with an ad campaign touting the slogan, "Yule crack up!". Once again, Chevy Chase plays the hapless Clark and Beverly D'Angelo his ever-optimistic wife Ellen but this time their goal is to host a big family Christmas celebration ...which predictably ends in disaster. Like the first Vacation (1983), Christmas Vacation is also based on a short story by screenwriter John Hughes - "Christmas '59," which was printed in the National Lampoon's magazine in December 1980. Hughes' involvement itself was a rare exception for the writer-director; he recalled in an interview, "The only sequels I was involved in were under duress - I was only involved in the third Vacation movie, for example ...the studio came to me and begged for another one, and I only agreed because I had a good story to base it on." Like the other Vacation films, Hughes did not direct Christmas Vacation; with only commercials under his belt, Jeremiah Chechik tried his hand with a feature film. He appears onscreen as well, albeit briefly: he's the face on the cover of the People magazine Clark reads in one scene.

Surprisingly enough, there are some unusual connections between Christmas Vacation and the venerable classic It's a Wonderful Life (1946). Not only is the newel post that Clark ends up sawing off a reference to the loose one in Wonderful Life, but you can see the Frank Capra film playing on the television during the grandparents' arrival scene. Behind the scenes there was another connection: the assistant director was Frank Capra III, the grandson of Wonderful Life's legendary director. And it was the television premiere of Christmas Vacation that secured higher ratings than the first network telecast of It's a Wonderful Life in 1994!

Fans who enjoyed the first Vacation film were delighted to see the return of dreadful Cousin Eddie, gleefully played by Randy Quaid. In another reference to Vacation, Eddie and Clark toast their eggnog in glass moose head mugs, a wink to Marty Moose and Walley World. Ed-heads should also know that one of his most memorable outfits, a black dickie visible under a white sweater, was actually Quaid's wife's idea. The character's popularity spawned a sequel of its own, the imminently forgettable Christmas Vacation 2: Cousin Eddie's Island Adventure (2003).

Producer: William S. Beasley, Mauri Syd Gayton, John Hughes, Tom Jacobson, Matty Simmons, Ramey E. Ward
Director: Jeremiah S. Chechik
Screenplay: John Hughes
Cinematography: Thomas Ackerman
Film Editing: Gerald Greenberg, Michael Stevenson
Art Direction: Beala Neel
Music: Angelo Badalamenti
Cast: Chevy Chase (Clark Griswold), Beverly D'Angelo (Ellen Griswold), Juliette Lewis (Audrey Griswold), Johnny Galecki (Rusty Griswold), John Randolph (Clark Griswold, Sr.), Diane Ladd (Nora Griswold).
C-97m. Letterboxed.

by Eleanor Quin
National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation

National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation

The third feature in National Lampoon's film franchise about the Griswold family, National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation arrived at cinemas in 1989 with an ad campaign touting the slogan, "Yule crack up!". Once again, Chevy Chase plays the hapless Clark and Beverly D'Angelo his ever-optimistic wife Ellen but this time their goal is to host a big family Christmas celebration ...which predictably ends in disaster. Like the first Vacation (1983), Christmas Vacation is also based on a short story by screenwriter John Hughes - "Christmas '59," which was printed in the National Lampoon's magazine in December 1980. Hughes' involvement itself was a rare exception for the writer-director; he recalled in an interview, "The only sequels I was involved in were under duress - I was only involved in the third Vacation movie, for example ...the studio came to me and begged for another one, and I only agreed because I had a good story to base it on." Like the other Vacation films, Hughes did not direct Christmas Vacation; with only commercials under his belt, Jeremiah Chechik tried his hand with a feature film. He appears onscreen as well, albeit briefly: he's the face on the cover of the People magazine Clark reads in one scene. Surprisingly enough, there are some unusual connections between Christmas Vacation and the venerable classic It's a Wonderful Life (1946). Not only is the newel post that Clark ends up sawing off a reference to the loose one in Wonderful Life, but you can see the Frank Capra film playing on the television during the grandparents' arrival scene. Behind the scenes there was another connection: the assistant director was Frank Capra III, the grandson of Wonderful Life's legendary director. And it was the television premiere of Christmas Vacation that secured higher ratings than the first network telecast of It's a Wonderful Life in 1994! Fans who enjoyed the first Vacation film were delighted to see the return of dreadful Cousin Eddie, gleefully played by Randy Quaid. In another reference to Vacation, Eddie and Clark toast their eggnog in glass moose head mugs, a wink to Marty Moose and Walley World. Ed-heads should also know that one of his most memorable outfits, a black dickie visible under a white sweater, was actually Quaid's wife's idea. The character's popularity spawned a sequel of its own, the imminently forgettable Christmas Vacation 2: Cousin Eddie's Island Adventure (2003). Producer: William S. Beasley, Mauri Syd Gayton, John Hughes, Tom Jacobson, Matty Simmons, Ramey E. Ward Director: Jeremiah S. Chechik Screenplay: John Hughes Cinematography: Thomas Ackerman Film Editing: Gerald Greenberg, Michael Stevenson Art Direction: Beala Neel Music: Angelo Badalamenti Cast: Chevy Chase (Clark Griswold), Beverly D'Angelo (Ellen Griswold), Juliette Lewis (Audrey Griswold), Johnny Galecki (Rusty Griswold), John Randolph (Clark Griswold, Sr.), Diane Ladd (Nora Griswold). C-97m. Letterboxed. by Eleanor Quin

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States November 1, 1990

Released in United States on Video May 9, 1990

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1989

Directorial debut for Jeremiah Chechik.

Began shooting March 27, 1989.

Completed shooting June 30, 1989.

Released in United States on Video May 9, 1990

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1989

Released in United States November 1, 1990