A Little Romance


1h 48m 1979
A Little Romance

Brief Synopsis

Teenagers elope with the help of an aging pickpocket.

Film Details

Also Known As
I Love You je t'aime, pequeño romance, Un
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Romance
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1979
Location
Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Two 13-year-olds meet in Paris: A rich, book-smart American girl named Lauren and a poor, street-wise French boy named Daniel. When they fall in love, Lauren's mother tries to break them up. Hearing that their love will last forever if they kiss under the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, the children enlist the help of an elderly pickpocket named Julius to help them run away.

Film Details

Also Known As
I Love You je t'aime, pequeño romance, Un
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Romance
Adaptation
Comedy
Drama
Release Date
1979
Location
Italy

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Stereo
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Wins

Best Music Original Dramatic Score

1980

Award Nominations

Best Writing, Screenplay

1980

Articles

A Little Romance


"I just don't know how to pinch myself and wake up from this dream; it feels like I'm still dreaming it," Diane Lane said in remarks to the audience after a recent screening of A Little Romance (1979), in which she costarred as a girl with the great Laurence Olivier. In this beguiling comedy-romance, under the direction of George Roy Hill, she had made her movie debut as a 14-year-old actress opposite the venerable actor, then 71 and entering the final phase of his film career. Olivier, Lane recalled, had been "lovely to work with" and "a constant professional" with whom she felt "incredibly blessed" to have shared scenes. He had been equally impressed with his young costar, predicting at the time that she would be "the next Grace Kelly."

In the film Lane plays Lauren King, a highly intelligent 13-year-old American living in Paris with her flighty, promiscuous mother (Sally Kellerman) and down-to-earth businessman stepfather (Arthur Hill). Mom's current amour is egotistical hack director George de Marco (David Dukes), and on the set of his latest film, Lauren meets another super-smart adolescent, scruffy young Frenchman Daniel Michon (Thelonius Bernard, also in his debut). Lauren reads Martin Heidegger in her spare time, and Daniel--when not functioning as a petty thief and small-time gambler--indulges in his love of cinema.

The youngsters quickly fall in love, but Lauren's mother forbids her to see the "filthy French boy" after he punches her obnoxious director boyfriend. The two encounter kindly old Julius (Olivier), a roguish pickpocket who tells them of a legend that "lovers who kiss beneath the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, at sunset as the bells of the Campanile toll, will love each other forever." Aware that she will soon be returning to America, Lauren enlists Julius's help in engineering a train trip to Italy with Daniel, and their disappearance almost sparks an international incident.

Among the films Daniel watches are Hill's two biggest hits, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). A Little Romance didn't approach that measure of success, and many of its early reviews were lackluster.

In The New York Times, Vincent Canby described the film as "so ponderous it almost seems mean-spirited...so relentlessly sweet-tempered that it winds up--like Pollyanna--alienating everyone not similarly affected." Roger Ebert's review in the Chicago Sun Times mentioned "dialog and situations so relentlessly cute we want to squirm." Some Olivier historians lumped the movie in with other films of the period in which he seemed to be acting in mediocre projects primarily for the paycheck.

Others, however, were more appreciative of the movie's charms. Frank Rich wrote in Time that it "offers an indecent amount of emotional and comic satisfaction." Georges Delerue's lilting score won an Academy Award (his only Oscar® out of five nominations), and the screenplay by Allan Burns (adapted from the 1977 Claude Klotz novel E=MC2 mon amour) also was nominated. Olivier's broadly accented performance, reminiscent of Maurice Chevalier's boulevardier characters, was nominated for a Golden Globe. Both Lane and Bernard won Young Artist Awards.

Over the years the movie has gained an enthusiastic following, and recent reviews have been more in line with Rich's. In DVD Movie Guide, John J. Puccio wrote, "It's a lovely tale of pure and innocent love and the lengths people involved in such a love will go to in their desire to ensure it. The movie can hardly fail to please even the most jaded audiences." Jeffrey M. Anderson wrote for Combustible Celluloid, "Olivier is at his charming best here ... deep into character, but also warm-hearted and generous."

The film was shot largely in sequence and on location, with picturesque views of Paris and Venice. When access to the Louvre was denied, the film crew built a replica set that included plaster reproductions. A scene-stealing Broderick Crawford appears briefly, playing himself as the star of the film-within-a-film.

Olivier was recovering from thrombosis and pneumonia during filming, and Hill had a specially designed bicycle with a motor made for the actor's ease in his cycling scenes. But Olivier spurned it and, when Hill was not around, rode a regular bike instead.

Lane's beauty and poise in her role landed her on the cover of Time in 1979 as a rising young star. She, of course, had a full and rewarding movie career ahead of her, but Bernard never made another film and instead returned to his studies and became a dentist in Nantes in his native France.

Two years after release of the film, India's Bollywood shot a remake in Tamil called Panneer Pushpangal (1981). In 2001 Klotz published a sequel to his novel, Pythagore, je t'adore (Pythagoras, I love you). To date it has not been filmed.

Director/Producer: George Roy Hill
Producer: Robert L. Crawford, Yves Rousset-Rouard
Screenwriter: Allan Burns
Cinematographer: Pierre-Wiliam Glenn
Composer: Georges Delerue
Editor: William H. Reynolds
Production Designer: Henry Bumstead
Costume Designer: Rosine Delamare
Executive Producer: Daniel Patrick Kelley
Cast: Laurence Olivier (Julius), Arthur Hill (Richard King), Sally Kellerman (Kay King), Diane Lane (Lauren), Thelonious Bernard (Daniel), Broderick Crawford (Brod).
C-110m. Letterboxed.

by Roger Fristoe

A Little Romance

A Little Romance

"I just don't know how to pinch myself and wake up from this dream; it feels like I'm still dreaming it," Diane Lane said in remarks to the audience after a recent screening of A Little Romance (1979), in which she costarred as a girl with the great Laurence Olivier. In this beguiling comedy-romance, under the direction of George Roy Hill, she had made her movie debut as a 14-year-old actress opposite the venerable actor, then 71 and entering the final phase of his film career. Olivier, Lane recalled, had been "lovely to work with" and "a constant professional" with whom she felt "incredibly blessed" to have shared scenes. He had been equally impressed with his young costar, predicting at the time that she would be "the next Grace Kelly." In the film Lane plays Lauren King, a highly intelligent 13-year-old American living in Paris with her flighty, promiscuous mother (Sally Kellerman) and down-to-earth businessman stepfather (Arthur Hill). Mom's current amour is egotistical hack director George de Marco (David Dukes), and on the set of his latest film, Lauren meets another super-smart adolescent, scruffy young Frenchman Daniel Michon (Thelonius Bernard, also in his debut). Lauren reads Martin Heidegger in her spare time, and Daniel--when not functioning as a petty thief and small-time gambler--indulges in his love of cinema. The youngsters quickly fall in love, but Lauren's mother forbids her to see the "filthy French boy" after he punches her obnoxious director boyfriend. The two encounter kindly old Julius (Olivier), a roguish pickpocket who tells them of a legend that "lovers who kiss beneath the Bridge of Sighs in Venice, at sunset as the bells of the Campanile toll, will love each other forever." Aware that she will soon be returning to America, Lauren enlists Julius's help in engineering a train trip to Italy with Daniel, and their disappearance almost sparks an international incident. Among the films Daniel watches are Hill's two biggest hits, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973). A Little Romance didn't approach that measure of success, and many of its early reviews were lackluster. In The New York Times, Vincent Canby described the film as "so ponderous it almost seems mean-spirited...so relentlessly sweet-tempered that it winds up--like Pollyanna--alienating everyone not similarly affected." Roger Ebert's review in the Chicago Sun Times mentioned "dialog and situations so relentlessly cute we want to squirm." Some Olivier historians lumped the movie in with other films of the period in which he seemed to be acting in mediocre projects primarily for the paycheck. Others, however, were more appreciative of the movie's charms. Frank Rich wrote in Time that it "offers an indecent amount of emotional and comic satisfaction." Georges Delerue's lilting score won an Academy Award (his only Oscar® out of five nominations), and the screenplay by Allan Burns (adapted from the 1977 Claude Klotz novel E=MC2 mon amour) also was nominated. Olivier's broadly accented performance, reminiscent of Maurice Chevalier's boulevardier characters, was nominated for a Golden Globe. Both Lane and Bernard won Young Artist Awards. Over the years the movie has gained an enthusiastic following, and recent reviews have been more in line with Rich's. In DVD Movie Guide, John J. Puccio wrote, "It's a lovely tale of pure and innocent love and the lengths people involved in such a love will go to in their desire to ensure it. The movie can hardly fail to please even the most jaded audiences." Jeffrey M. Anderson wrote for Combustible Celluloid, "Olivier is at his charming best here ... deep into character, but also warm-hearted and generous." The film was shot largely in sequence and on location, with picturesque views of Paris and Venice. When access to the Louvre was denied, the film crew built a replica set that included plaster reproductions. A scene-stealing Broderick Crawford appears briefly, playing himself as the star of the film-within-a-film. Olivier was recovering from thrombosis and pneumonia during filming, and Hill had a specially designed bicycle with a motor made for the actor's ease in his cycling scenes. But Olivier spurned it and, when Hill was not around, rode a regular bike instead. Lane's beauty and poise in her role landed her on the cover of Time in 1979 as a rising young star. She, of course, had a full and rewarding movie career ahead of her, but Bernard never made another film and instead returned to his studies and became a dentist in Nantes in his native France. Two years after release of the film, India's Bollywood shot a remake in Tamil called Panneer Pushpangal (1981). In 2001 Klotz published a sequel to his novel, Pythagore, je t'adore (Pythagoras, I love you). To date it has not been filmed. Director/Producer: George Roy Hill Producer: Robert L. Crawford, Yves Rousset-Rouard Screenwriter: Allan Burns Cinematographer: Pierre-Wiliam Glenn Composer: Georges Delerue Editor: William H. Reynolds Production Designer: Henry Bumstead Costume Designer: Rosine Delamare Executive Producer: Daniel Patrick Kelley Cast: Laurence Olivier (Julius), Arthur Hill (Richard King), Sally Kellerman (Kay King), Diane Lane (Lauren), Thelonious Bernard (Daniel), Broderick Crawford (Brod). C-110m. Letterboxed. by Roger Fristoe

A Little Romance


A Little Romance (1979) tells the story of two 13-year-olds who fall in love. American Lauren King (Diane Lane) meets Daniel (Thelonious Bernard) while living in Paris with her mother and step-father. The teens share above average IQs, but Lauren prefers books while Daniel loves movies and horse racing. The young couple meets Julius (Laurence Olivier), an aging pickpocket, who tells an enchanting tale: if two lovers kiss under the Bridge of Sighs in Venice at sunset, their love will last forever. When Lauren learns her father is being transferred back to the United States, she decides to run away to Venice with Daniel. Since they will need an adult to cross the border, they convince Julius to go with them by telling him Lauren's sick mother is in Venice. Lauren and Daniel's journey is put in jeopardy, however, when the police suspect Julius of kidnapping the teens.

At the time of filming, Laurence Olivier was 71 years old and recovering from pneumonia and thrombosis. In spite of his health problems, he still insisted on doing his own stunts. In an attempt to make things easier for Olivier, director George Roy Hill ordered a specially designed bicycle. The device had a motor that would make it look like Olivier was pedaling, but the actor refused to get on it. To prove his point, Olivier climbed on a regular bicycle when Hill was not around and took off down a hill on his own, earning the right to perform the act for the cameras.

A Little Romance makes several references to other films, particularly those by director George Roy Hill. The film opens with Daniel watching Hill's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969). Then later, Daniel and Lauren hide out in a theater showing The Sting (1973). Additionally, look for actor Broderick Crawford appearing as himself.

Composer Georges Delerue received an Academy Award for Best Score. A Little Romance was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. The Allan Burns script was based on the novel E=MC2, mon amour by Patrick Cauvin.

Director/Producer: George Roy Hill
Producer: Robert L. Crawford, Yves Rousset-Rouard
Screenwriter: Allan Burns
Cinematographer: Pierre-Wiliam Glenn
Composer: Georges Delerue
Editor: William H. Reynolds
Production Designer: Henry Bumstead
Costume Designer: Rosine Delamare
Executive Producer: Daniel Patrick Kelley
Cast: Laurence Olivier (Julius), Arthur Hill (Richard King), Sally Kellerman (Kay King), Diane Lane (Lauren), Thelonious Bernard (Daniel), Broderick Crawford (Brod).
C-110m. Letterboxed.

by Deborah Looney

A Little Romance

A Little Romance (1979) tells the story of two 13-year-olds who fall in love. American Lauren King (Diane Lane) meets Daniel (Thelonious Bernard) while living in Paris with her mother and step-father. The teens share above average IQs, but Lauren prefers books while Daniel loves movies and horse racing. The young couple meets Julius (Laurence Olivier), an aging pickpocket, who tells an enchanting tale: if two lovers kiss under the Bridge of Sighs in Venice at sunset, their love will last forever. When Lauren learns her father is being transferred back to the United States, she decides to run away to Venice with Daniel. Since they will need an adult to cross the border, they convince Julius to go with them by telling him Lauren's sick mother is in Venice. Lauren and Daniel's journey is put in jeopardy, however, when the police suspect Julius of kidnapping the teens. At the time of filming, Laurence Olivier was 71 years old and recovering from pneumonia and thrombosis. In spite of his health problems, he still insisted on doing his own stunts. In an attempt to make things easier for Olivier, director George Roy Hill ordered a specially designed bicycle. The device had a motor that would make it look like Olivier was pedaling, but the actor refused to get on it. To prove his point, Olivier climbed on a regular bicycle when Hill was not around and took off down a hill on his own, earning the right to perform the act for the cameras. A Little Romance makes several references to other films, particularly those by director George Roy Hill. The film opens with Daniel watching Hill's Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969). Then later, Daniel and Lauren hide out in a theater showing The Sting (1973). Additionally, look for actor Broderick Crawford appearing as himself. Composer Georges Delerue received an Academy Award for Best Score. A Little Romance was also nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay. The Allan Burns script was based on the novel E=MC2, mon amour by Patrick Cauvin. Director/Producer: George Roy Hill Producer: Robert L. Crawford, Yves Rousset-Rouard Screenwriter: Allan Burns Cinematographer: Pierre-Wiliam Glenn Composer: Georges Delerue Editor: William H. Reynolds Production Designer: Henry Bumstead Costume Designer: Rosine Delamare Executive Producer: Daniel Patrick Kelley Cast: Laurence Olivier (Julius), Arthur Hill (Richard King), Sally Kellerman (Kay King), Diane Lane (Lauren), Thelonious Bernard (Daniel), Broderick Crawford (Brod). C-110m. Letterboxed. by Deborah Looney

TCM Remembers George Roy Hill, 1922-2002


George Roy Hill, the Academy Award winning director who is fondly remembered for guiding Paul Newman and Robert Redford in two of their most memorable hits, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973), died Friday, December 20, 2002, in his New York City apartment. He was 81, and had been struggling with Parkinson's disease.

Born on December 20, 1922, to a well-to-do Minneapolis newspaper family, Hill would hang out at the local airfield as a child and watch the barnstorming pilots, fascinated by their theatrics. His intense interest would eventually drive him to earn his pilot's license by age 16. But his love for the performing arts was inspired by a different calling - the stage, where he appeared in student productions at his prep school in Hopkins, Minnesota. After graduating, he majored in music at Yale. A baritone, he became a member of the university Glee Club but he soon discovered that singing wasn't his forte. He found acting more suitable and joined the Dramatic Society, becoming its president and appearing in campus musicals. Ten days after graduating with a bachelor's degree in music in 1943, Hill joined the Navy. After flight school, he transferred to the Marines and piloted transport planes in the South Pacific during World War II.

Following the war, he worked briefly as a cub reporter on a family newspaper in Texas, then used the GI Bill to attend Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, where he earned a bachelor's degree in literature in 1949 and did a stint with the Abbey theatre. Back in the United States, he received good reviews in an off-Broadway play, Strindberg's The Creditors with Beatrice Arthur, and toured with Margaret Webster's Shakespearean company - a celebrated theatrical company for its time. The Korean War interrupted his career, when Hill was recalled to Marine duty, serving 18 months at a training center in North Carolina, and later emerging as a major. The time spent away from the theater was beneficial to Hill, and he decided to move away from acting toward writing. His scripts soon found their way to television and Hill quickly rose from assistant director to director on several of the most acclaimed live dramas of the '50s including The Helen Morgan Story, the original TV production of Judgment at Nuremberg. He also earned two Emmy Awards for writing and directing a Titanic story, A Night to Remember.

In 1957, Hill moved to Broadway, where he directed the Pulitzer Prize-winning Look Homeward, Angel. After directing Tennessee Williams' Period of Adjustment, Hill kicked off his film career by directing the 1962 film version, which gave Jane Fonda her first major role. He followed that up with the film adaptation of Lillian Hellman's classic play, Toys in the Attic (1963), but it would be his third film that would earn Hill critical acclaim, the marvelous Peter Sellers' comedy The World of Henry Orient (1964). The story concerning two teenage girls who stalk a concert pianist (Sellers) around New York City, established Hill's brisk style and his flair for bittersweet comedy. His next two films, both starring Julie Andrews, were James Michener's epic Hawaii (1966), and the big-budget musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his craftsmanship was always impeccable, both films failed to elevate him to the front ranks of Hollywood directors.

That all changed with Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Few associated with the film could have predicted that this light-hearted western would be the box-office smash it became when it was released, but audiences fell in love with this charming and innovative film. Instead of playing Butch (Newman) and Sundance (Redford) as vicious outlaws, Hill and screenwriter William Goldman made them easy-going, sympathetic drifters for whom robbing banks was just a game. As the director, Hill kept the balance between the film's comedy and drama pitch perfect, emphasizing the straightforward storytelling which was free from any heavy-handed editorializing. Also, by giving the characters a modern feel with contemporary dialogue and using an upbeat, pop-oriented Burt Bacharach score, Hill breathed fresh life into the Western genre. The film deservedly received Oscar nominations for Best Picture and Best Director; and earned Oscars for Conrad Hall's cinematography, Burt Bacharach's original score, the Bacharach/Hal David composition "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head", as well as Goldman's original screenplay.

Newman and Redford would be reunited again with Hill for his next big hit The Sting, as con men who ensnare a brutal gangster (Robert Shaw) in an intricate scheme. A highly stylized piece of work, Hill crafted the film in the style of the old Saturday Evening Post graphics, complete with chapter headings; imitated the flat camera style that was employed for those classic Warner Bros. gangster movies and resurrected the ragtime piano of Scott Joplin for the score (as interpreted by Marvin Hamlisch). For his exceptional work, Hill won the Academy Award for Best Director and the film also bagged Oscars for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay (David S. Ward), Best Score (Hamlisch), Best Editing (William Reynolds), Best Costume Design (Edith Head) and Best Art Direction (Henry Bumstead and James Payne).

Hill would work with Redford and Newman again, albeit individually, later in the decade. The Great Waldo Pepper (1975), the story of a barnstorming pilot, was culled from some evocative childhood memories, yet despite the star power of Redford, it was not a success. Nor was the Paul Newman vehicle Slap Shot (1977), a raucous look at the lives of minor league ice hockey players. The off-color language and bawdy locker-room antics perplexed audiences and critics at the time, although it's now considered to be one of the best (and funniest) of all sports films.

Although he would never again scale the critical and commercial success of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid or The Sting, Hill would enjoy later acclaim with the sweet natured A Little Romance (1979), starring Laurence Olivier and a 13-year-old Diane Lane; his ambitious adaptation of John Irving's episodic The World According to Garp (1982); and his final film, the slight, but pleasant Chevy Chase comedy Funny Farm (1988). Soon after that, Hill retired from Hollywood to teach at his old Alma Mater Yale. Hill is survived by his former wife, Louisa Horton, as well as two sons, George Roy Hill III of Roslyn, N.Y., and John Andrew Steele Hill of Ardsley, N.Y; two daughters, Frances Breckinridge Phipps of Dumont, N.J., and Owens Hill of Los Angeles; and 12 grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole

TCM Remembers George Roy Hill, 1922-2002

George Roy Hill, the Academy Award winning director who is fondly remembered for guiding Paul Newman and Robert Redford in two of their most memorable hits, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and The Sting (1973), died Friday, December 20, 2002, in his New York City apartment. He was 81, and had been struggling with Parkinson's disease. Born on December 20, 1922, to a well-to-do Minneapolis newspaper family, Hill would hang out at the local airfield as a child and watch the barnstorming pilots, fascinated by their theatrics. His intense interest would eventually drive him to earn his pilot's license by age 16. But his love for the performing arts was inspired by a different calling - the stage, where he appeared in student productions at his prep school in Hopkins, Minnesota. After graduating, he majored in music at Yale. A baritone, he became a member of the university Glee Club but he soon discovered that singing wasn't his forte. He found acting more suitable and joined the Dramatic Society, becoming its president and appearing in campus musicals. Ten days after graduating with a bachelor's degree in music in 1943, Hill joined the Navy. After flight school, he transferred to the Marines and piloted transport planes in the South Pacific during World War II. Following the war, he worked briefly as a cub reporter on a family newspaper in Texas, then used the GI Bill to attend Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland, where he earned a bachelor's degree in literature in 1949 and did a stint with the Abbey theatre. Back in the United States, he received good reviews in an off-Broadway play, Strindberg's The Creditors with Beatrice Arthur, and toured with Margaret Webster's Shakespearean company - a celebrated theatrical company for its time. The Korean War interrupted his career, when Hill was recalled to Marine duty, serving 18 months at a training center in North Carolina, and later emerging as a major. The time spent away from the theater was beneficial to Hill, and he decided to move away from acting toward writing. His scripts soon found their way to television and Hill quickly rose from assistant director to director on several of the most acclaimed live dramas of the '50s including The Helen Morgan Story, the original TV production of Judgment at Nuremberg. He also earned two Emmy Awards for writing and directing a Titanic story, A Night to Remember. In 1957, Hill moved to Broadway, where he directed the Pulitzer Prize-winning Look Homeward, Angel. After directing Tennessee Williams' Period of Adjustment, Hill kicked off his film career by directing the 1962 film version, which gave Jane Fonda her first major role. He followed that up with the film adaptation of Lillian Hellman's classic play, Toys in the Attic (1963), but it would be his third film that would earn Hill critical acclaim, the marvelous Peter Sellers' comedy The World of Henry Orient (1964). The story concerning two teenage girls who stalk a concert pianist (Sellers) around New York City, established Hill's brisk style and his flair for bittersweet comedy. His next two films, both starring Julie Andrews, were James Michener's epic Hawaii (1966), and the big-budget musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his craftsmanship was always impeccable, both films failed to elevate him to the front ranks of Hollywood directors. That all changed with Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. Few associated with the film could have predicted that this light-hearted western would be the box-office smash it became when it was released, but audiences fell in love with this charming and innovative film. Instead of playing Butch (Newman) and Sundance (Redford) as vicious outlaws, Hill and screenwriter William Goldman made them easy-going, sympathetic drifters for whom robbing banks was just a game. As the director, Hill kept the balance between the film's comedy and drama pitch perfect, emphasizing the straightforward storytelling which was free from any heavy-handed editorializing. Also, by giving the characters a modern feel with contemporary dialogue and using an upbeat, pop-oriented Burt Bacharach score, Hill breathed fresh life into the Western genre. The film deservedly received Oscar nominations for Best Picture and Best Director; and earned Oscars for Conrad Hall's cinematography, Burt Bacharach's original score, the Bacharach/Hal David composition "Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head", as well as Goldman's original screenplay. Newman and Redford would be reunited again with Hill for his next big hit The Sting, as con men who ensnare a brutal gangster (Robert Shaw) in an intricate scheme. A highly stylized piece of work, Hill crafted the film in the style of the old Saturday Evening Post graphics, complete with chapter headings; imitated the flat camera style that was employed for those classic Warner Bros. gangster movies and resurrected the ragtime piano of Scott Joplin for the score (as interpreted by Marvin Hamlisch). For his exceptional work, Hill won the Academy Award for Best Director and the film also bagged Oscars for Best Picture, Best Original Screenplay (David S. Ward), Best Score (Hamlisch), Best Editing (William Reynolds), Best Costume Design (Edith Head) and Best Art Direction (Henry Bumstead and James Payne). Hill would work with Redford and Newman again, albeit individually, later in the decade. The Great Waldo Pepper (1975), the story of a barnstorming pilot, was culled from some evocative childhood memories, yet despite the star power of Redford, it was not a success. Nor was the Paul Newman vehicle Slap Shot (1977), a raucous look at the lives of minor league ice hockey players. The off-color language and bawdy locker-room antics perplexed audiences and critics at the time, although it's now considered to be one of the best (and funniest) of all sports films. Although he would never again scale the critical and commercial success of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid or The Sting, Hill would enjoy later acclaim with the sweet natured A Little Romance (1979), starring Laurence Olivier and a 13-year-old Diane Lane; his ambitious adaptation of John Irving's episodic The World According to Garp (1982); and his final film, the slight, but pleasant Chevy Chase comedy Funny Farm (1988). Soon after that, Hill retired from Hollywood to teach at his old Alma Mater Yale. Hill is survived by his former wife, Louisa Horton, as well as two sons, George Roy Hill III of Roslyn, N.Y., and John Andrew Steele Hill of Ardsley, N.Y; two daughters, Frances Breckinridge Phipps of Dumont, N.J., and Owens Hill of Los Angeles; and 12 grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States March 1979

Released in United States Spring April 1979

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States March 1979 (Shown at FILMEX: Los Angeles International Film Exposition (Closing Night) March 14-30, 1979.)

Released in United States Spring April 1979