The Lawnmower Man


1h 48m 1992
The Lawnmower Man

Brief Synopsis

A sceintist obsessed with virtual reality experiments on a gardener's assistant.

Film Details

Also Known As
Lawnmower Man, cobaye
MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
NEW LINE CINEMA (NEW LINE)
Location
Northern California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Synopsis

A slow-witted teenager develops a super intellect when he becomes a guinea pig for a scientist experimenting with virtual reality.

Crew

Melinda Armstrong

Stunt Player

Gregory Austin

Carpenter

Rick Avery

Stunt Player

Justin Bailey

On-Set Dresser

Mike Ballew

Driver

Rick Barker

Stunt Player

Daniel W. Barringer

Stunt Player

Alan Baumgarten

Editor

Bobby Bednar

Carpenter

Katherine L Benavides

Wardrobe Assistant

Phillip Billey

Carpenter

Jody Bingenheimer

Driver

Paula Bowering

Other

Dan Bradley

Stunt Coordinator

Patti Brand

Makeup

Michel Briere

Carpenter

Andrew Broomhead

Transportation Co-Captain

Charlotte Brosnan

Production Assistant

Bobby Burns

Stunt Player

Hal Burton

Stunt Player

Danny Butch

On-Set Dresser

Russell Carpenter

Director Of Photography

Elizabeth Castro

Assistant Editor

Frank Ceglia

Special Effects

Tom Ceglia

Special Effects

Thomas Chandler

Assistant Camera Operator

Lisa Cholodenko

Assistant Editor

Lisa Cochran

Production Coordinator

Marty Collins

Steadicam Operator

Scott Cook

Stunt Player

Shawn Holly Cookson

Assistant Costume Designer

Elizabeth Cooper-smokler

Production Assistant

Joe Cosentino

Transportation Captain

Wayne Daddio

Other

Laura Dash

Stunt Player

Dino Demariadave Schnier

Driver

Todd A Dos Reis

Assistant Camera Operator

Mara Duronslet

Assistant

Chris Emory

Swing Gang

Rodger Enochson

Carpenter

Robert P Enriquez

Assistant Production Accountant

Steve Eustace

Carpenter

Gimel Everett

Screenplay

Gimel Everett

Producer

Russell C. Fager

Sound Mixer

Chris Farmer

Art Director

Julie Fife

Electrician

George Fisher

Stunt Player

Michael Grover Forster

Other

Mary Jane Fort

Costume Designer

Ron Freeto

Carpenter

Michael Fuller

Swing Gang

Jason Garrett

Art Assistant

Dale Gibson

Stunt Player

Anthony Giovannini

Carpenter

Michael Gooch

Carpenter

Chris Gorak

Assistant

Ron Gress

Other

Gerardo Gudino

Other

Paul Haines

Special Effects

Tim Harris

Welder

Geno Hart

Stunt Player

Geno Hart

Transportation Coordinator

John Hulett

On-Set Dresser

John Hulett

Swing Gang

Alvin Hurd

Driver

Craig Hutchison

Production Accountant

Steve Irwin

Video Playback

Mark R Jackson

Assistant Camera Operator

Patrick Jackson

Other

Mark Jaime

Carpenter

Jeffrey A Johnson

Dolly Grip

Sarah Nugent Johnstone

Assistant Director

Al Jones

Stunt Player

Brett Jones

Stunt Player

Dave Joseph

Production

Robert Katz

Location Manager

Geno Kerry

Grip

Stephen King

From Story

David R Kohn

Best Boy

Andrew Kusmierz

Art Assistant

Steve Lane

Executive Producer

Anthony Laponsie

Other

Steven Laponsie

Other

Michael T Larson

Production Assistant

Mara J Lee

Assistant Director

Brett Leonard

Screenplay

Gregg Leonard

Driver

Greg Lille

Consultant

Michele Lilley

Assistant Production Coordinator

Matthew Martin

Carpenter

Chris Masson

Swing Gang

Jacqueline Masson

Set Decorator

Alex Mcdowell

Production Designer

Eamonn Mcglynn

Carpenter

Darren Mclaughlin

Electrician

Brian Mcmillan

Technical Advisor

Peter Mcrae

Associate Producer

Ian Mcvey

Assistant Director

Tony Medina

Carpenter

Seth Micklin

Swing Gang

Voya Mikulic

Gaffer

Lloyd Moriarity

Key Grip

George Niciforos

Art Assistant

Thomas J O'brien

Carpenter

Mark Orrison

Stunt Player

Alfonse Pagano

Other

Carlo Papica

Electrician

Mike Pappas

Electrician

Cindy Parisotto

Assistant Editor

Thomas G Petrello

Swing Gang

Tome Petrello

On-Set Dresser

Jason Pollack

Other

Lee Poppie

Stunt Player

Tim Price

Assistant Set Decorator

Robert Pringle

Executive Producer

Eric Ramsey

Storyboard Artist

Vincent Rapini

Dolly Grip

Kati Rogers

Script Supervisor

Hayden Rosenaur

Craft Service

Kevin D Ross

Associate Editor

Kerry Rossall

Stunt Player

Garner Ryan

Carpenter

Vito Sanfilippo

On-Set Dresser

Adam Santelli

Electrician

Heidi Santelli

Production Assistant

Chris Santini

Carpenter

Ted Schelling

Video Playback

Pete Sebring

Driver

Tim Sherrier

Carpenter

Patrick Shields

Other

Edward D Simons

Executive Producer

Philip Singh

Other

R. Vincent Smith

Assistant Property Master

Ronald B Smith

Driver

Jerry Snajczuk

Driver

Erik Stabenau

Stunt Player

Rachel L Sterns

Production Assistant

Mick Strawn

Carpenter

Milton Subotski

Coproducer

Steven Suchman

Assistant Art Director

Suzanne Tenner

Photography

David Thorpe

Other

Vincent Tremonti

Makeup

Eric Troop

On-Set Dresser

Patricia Troy

Casting Associate

Jonathon Tucker

Swing Gang

Clive Turner

Executive Producer

Wendy Van Dyke

Wardrobe Supervisor

Butch Von Bulow

Grip

Christopher M Waldoch

Driver

Kevin J Ward

Boom Operator

Perry Welch

Carpenter

Richard Welch

Construction Coordinator

Adam Welles

Other

Patty Whitcher

Production Manager

Alexandra Wiesenfeld

Other

Heidi Williams

Makeup Assistant

Briana Wilson

Art Department Coordinator

Dan Wyman

Music

Thomas H Yarnall

Carpenter

Brook Yeaton

Property Master

Michael Yip

Post-Production Coordinator

Michael Yip

Assistant Location Manager

Paul Zelis

Swing Gang

Videos

Movie Clip

Lawnmower Man, The (1992) - Virtual Space Industries Opening the world wide indy hit from director Brett Leonard and producer and co-writer Gimel Everett, barely based on the Stephen King story from which the title came, Pierce Brosnan as a virtual reality scientist and Mark Bringleson his boss, and an experiment with a chimp about to go wrong, in The Lawnmower Man, 1992.
Lawnmower Man, The (1992) - You Have The Best Games Having quit his virtual reality chimp-research job because of its military applications, frustrated Dr. Angelo (Pierce Brosnan) is inspired to recruit his dimwit yard man Jobe (Jeff Fahey), which leads to him getting hooked up on gaming gear with the neighbor kid (Austin O’Brien), in the indy hit and tech sensation The Lawnmower Man, 1992.
Lawnmower Man, The (1992) - It Works With A Human Subject Jobe (Jeff Fahey, title character), increasingly hunky, intelligent and egotistical due to training and virtual reality experiments, stands up to his tormentor Father McKeen (Jeremy Slate), while scientist Larry Angelo (Pierce Brosnan), who’s behind his transformation, asks his former boss (Mark Bringleson) for access to better tech, in The Lawnmower Man, 1992.
Lawnmower Man, The (1992) - Doing Penance All Night Introduction of co-star Jeff Fahey as Jobe who, we learn, is a marginally functional adult living in a maintenance shed behind a church, looked over by his older brother (Geoffrey Lewis), the character loosely derived from the Steven King story which was the basis for the title, if not the story, in the virtual-reality sci-fi thriller The Lawnmower Man, 1992.

Film Details

Also Known As
Lawnmower Man, cobaye
MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Thriller
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
NEW LINE CINEMA (NEW LINE)
Location
Northern California, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m

Articles

The Lawnmower Man


In 1975, one year after his debut novel Carrie, Stephen King published his short story "The Lawnmower Man" in Cavalier magazine and used it in 1978 as a key entry in his much-loved anthology, Night Shift. That collection became a rich source for short films by student and other fledgling filmmakers that could be licensed from the author for one dollar. These "Dollar Babies" included stories like "Children of the Corn," "The Mangler," "The Woman in the Room" and "The Boogeyman" all going before the cameras on some form or another. "The Lawnmower Man," a peculiar and haunting little vignette, charts the macabre consequences when a yardwork-phobic man named Harold Parkette enlists a lawnmowing service and gets far more than he anticipated. The tale was eventually adapted into a 1987 Dollar Baby short film that marked the screenwriting debut of future In the Mouth of Madness (1994) screenwriter and New Line president of production Michael De Luca.

Then things took a bizarre turn. A year before a 27-year-old De Luca started running the production ship at New Line, the studio released The Lawnmower Man in 1992, initially as Stephen King's The Lawnmower Man until the author protested via two rounds in court that the film bore no similarity to his work. Apart from one scene of Jobe Smith (Jeff Fahey) mowing a lawn and a death by lawnmower, King was correct since the project did indeed come from an unrelated screenplay entitled Cyber God written by the film's director, Brett Leonard, and producer Gimel Everett. In fact, Leonard would continue to be associated with computer-generated effects and virtual reality throughout his career, most notably with the film Virtuosity (1995) and a string of IMAX, music video and interactive experiential projects.

While the film largely deviates from the source material, its array of groundbreaking computer-generated effects works in its favor. Though it may not dazzle so much now but were the subject of much chatter upon the film's release and became an early exemplar of virtual reality. The depiction of an entirely digital realm mirrored a similar craze on home video for the abstract CGI favorite The Mind's Eye (1990), so much so that the raw computerized material for this film was later integrated into a sequel released at the end of 1992, Beyond the Mind's Eye. The computerized effects for the feature were the handiwork of Angel Studios, a California-based video game developer who later became absorbed into Rockstar Games as one of its subsidiaries, Rock San Diego, which spawned the popular Red Dead Redemption game.

A significant box office success, the film is essentially an updated Frankenstein story with Dr. Lawrence Angelo (Pierce Brosnan) using the intellectually stunted and abused yardman Jobe Smith (Jeff Fahey) in a virtual reality experiment to increase his mental faculties. The process is a success, but Jobe also acquires formidable powers that soon pose a threat to everyone around him. The film's popularity would go on to inspire two video games and a sequel, Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace (1996). The standard theatrical version running 103 minutes was issued on VHS and laserdisc, but viewers also had the option of an unrated director's cut that expanded the film tremendously to 141 minutes with entire subplots and extensive character development reinstated. Fans still debate which one is preferable, citing the theatrical cut as a tighter and more focused work while others find the director's cut more coherent and fully realized. Either way, its popularity continues to endure with its influence still felt in such mind-expanding techno science fiction films as Lucy (2014).

By Nathaniel Thompson
The Lawnmower Man

The Lawnmower Man

In 1975, one year after his debut novel Carrie, Stephen King published his short story "The Lawnmower Man" in Cavalier magazine and used it in 1978 as a key entry in his much-loved anthology, Night Shift. That collection became a rich source for short films by student and other fledgling filmmakers that could be licensed from the author for one dollar. These "Dollar Babies" included stories like "Children of the Corn," "The Mangler," "The Woman in the Room" and "The Boogeyman" all going before the cameras on some form or another. "The Lawnmower Man," a peculiar and haunting little vignette, charts the macabre consequences when a yardwork-phobic man named Harold Parkette enlists a lawnmowing service and gets far more than he anticipated. The tale was eventually adapted into a 1987 Dollar Baby short film that marked the screenwriting debut of future In the Mouth of Madness (1994) screenwriter and New Line president of production Michael De Luca. Then things took a bizarre turn. A year before a 27-year-old De Luca started running the production ship at New Line, the studio released The Lawnmower Man in 1992, initially as Stephen King's The Lawnmower Man until the author protested via two rounds in court that the film bore no similarity to his work. Apart from one scene of Jobe Smith (Jeff Fahey) mowing a lawn and a death by lawnmower, King was correct since the project did indeed come from an unrelated screenplay entitled Cyber God written by the film's director, Brett Leonard, and producer Gimel Everett. In fact, Leonard would continue to be associated with computer-generated effects and virtual reality throughout his career, most notably with the film Virtuosity (1995) and a string of IMAX, music video and interactive experiential projects. While the film largely deviates from the source material, its array of groundbreaking computer-generated effects works in its favor. Though it may not dazzle so much now but were the subject of much chatter upon the film's release and became an early exemplar of virtual reality. The depiction of an entirely digital realm mirrored a similar craze on home video for the abstract CGI favorite The Mind's Eye (1990), so much so that the raw computerized material for this film was later integrated into a sequel released at the end of 1992, Beyond the Mind's Eye. The computerized effects for the feature were the handiwork of Angel Studios, a California-based video game developer who later became absorbed into Rockstar Games as one of its subsidiaries, Rock San Diego, which spawned the popular Red Dead Redemption game. A significant box office success, the film is essentially an updated Frankenstein story with Dr. Lawrence Angelo (Pierce Brosnan) using the intellectually stunted and abused yardman Jobe Smith (Jeff Fahey) in a virtual reality experiment to increase his mental faculties. The process is a success, but Jobe also acquires formidable powers that soon pose a threat to everyone around him. The film's popularity would go on to inspire two video games and a sequel, Lawnmower Man 2: Beyond Cyberspace (1996). The standard theatrical version running 103 minutes was issued on VHS and laserdisc, but viewers also had the option of an unrated director's cut that expanded the film tremendously to 141 minutes with entire subplots and extensive character development reinstated. Fans still debate which one is preferable, citing the theatrical cut as a tighter and more focused work while others find the director's cut more coherent and fully realized. Either way, its popularity continues to endure with its influence still felt in such mind-expanding techno science fiction films as Lucy (2014). By Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Limited Release in United States February 14, 1992

Released in United States 1992

Released in United States on Video August 26, 1992

Released in United States Spring March 6, 1992

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica February 27 - March 6, 1992.

Began shooting May 28, 1991.

Completed shooting July 22, 1991.

Released in United States 1992 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica February 27 - March 6, 1992.)

Limited Release in United States February 14, 1992 (test)

Released in United States Spring March 6, 1992

Released in United States on Video August 26, 1992 (in R-rated and unrated versions)