The Hidden


1h 37m 1987
The Hidden

Brief Synopsis

An alien parasite drives those that it infects to commit violent crimes.

Film Details

Also Known As
Hidden
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror/Science-Fiction
Action
Crime
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
NEW LINE CINEMA (NEW LINE)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Story traces a bizarre series of murders committed by previously law-abiding citizens.

Crew

Benita Allen

Assistant Director

David Appelbaum

Production Assistant

Rick Avery

Stunts

Petra Bach

Adr Editor

Sarah Bardo

Costumes

David Barrett

Production Assistant

James R Barrows

Set Decorator

Stiv Bators

Song

Annette Benson

Casting

Kevin Benson

Music Supervisor

Kevin Benson

Song

Steve Berens

Animal Trainer

Howard Berger

Special Makeup Effects

Michael Blaise

Production Assistant

Ella St John Blakey

Art Assistant

Michael Bloecher

Music Editor

Martin Bresin

Special Effects

Geoff Brewer

Stunts

Bob F Brown

Stunts

Everett Burrell

Special Makeup Effects

Hal Burton

Stunts

Frank Byers

Camera Operator

Bobby Caldwell

Song

David Cannon

On-Set Dresser

Rebecca Carriaga

Art Department Coordinator

Jane Cassell

Choreographer

Cindy Clark

Production Assistant

Jason Clark

Assistant Director

Michael Convertino

Music

Monty Cox

Stunts

Gino Crognale

Special Makeup Effects

Mark Crookston

Sound Editor

Malissa Daniel

Costume Designer

Brett Darkin

Production Assistant

Jeff Dashnaw

Stunts

Fred Dawson

Foley Artist

Stephen Diener

Executive Producer

Victor Dubois

Associate Editor

Paul A. Edwards

Director Of Photography

Paul A. Edwards

Camera Operator

Sue Elliot

Makeup

Andrew Epper

Stunts

Donald W Ernst

Sound Editor

Elizabeth Ervin

Production Assistant

Larry Evans

Stand-In

Joe Fineman

Post-Production Supervisor

Glory Fioramonti

Stunts

Gerrit V Folsom

Location Manager

Greg Gault

Stunts

Cathy Gesualdo

Assistant Director

Mack Gorden

Song

Dennis Greaves

Song

Bruno Gumbots

Song Performer

Jeffrey J. Haboush

Sound

Jacques Haitkin

Director Of Photography

Dennis Harris

Executive Producer

Brian Holland

Song

Eddie Holland

Song

Ray Horwitz

Sound Editor

Bob Hunt

Screenplay

Dream Quest Images

Special Effects

Brian James

Song

Steve James

Special Makeup Effects

Daryl Kass

Production Manager

Katherine Kean

Animator

Jeffrey J Kiehlbauch

Production Coordinator

Dave Kindlon

Special Makeup Effects

Robert King

Stunts

Justin Klarenbeck

Visual Effects Supervisor

Warren Kleiman

Adr

Jeffrey Klein

Executive Producer

Jeff Klevan

Song

Michael N Knue

Editor

Jim Kouf

Screenplay

Gary Krivacek

Sound Editor

Robert Kurtzman

Special Makeup Effects

Gregory C Landerer

Special Effects Coordinator

Larry Lanoff

Production Assistant

Lane Leavitt

Stunts

Mandy Lee

Song Performer

Irving Lewis

Stunts

Mick Lister

Song

Tom Lowe

Production Assistant

Jim Mankey

Song

Niki Marvin

Associate Producer

Jeff Matakovich

Visual Effects

Alan Z Mccurdy

Production Assistant

Cole Mckay

Stunts

Michael Meltzer

Producer

Jonathan Metzler

Production Assistant

Sharon Michaels

Foley Artist

Deborah Moore

Production Supervisor

Lee Muhl

Executive Producer

Josef Myrow

Song

Johnette Napolitano

Song

Arthur Nay

Stunts

Maureen O'connell

Editor

John O'connor

Production Assistant

Gerald T Olson

Producer

Mark Orrison

Stunts

Lollie Ortiz

Titles

Robert Perault

Stand-In

Diane Peterson

Stunts

Don Pike

Stunt Coordinator

Gary Pike

Stunts

Christa Reusch-simmons

Makeup

Sara Risher

Associate Producer

Todd Roberts

Wardrobe

John O Robinson

Sound Editor

Grant Rose

Stand-In

Greg P. Russell

Sound

Eric Rylander

Special Effects

Mike Salvetta

Foley Artist

Jackson Schwartz

Foley

Jim Shaw

Animator

Robert Shaye

Producer

Mitch Simmons

Scenic Artist

Charlie Skeen

Stunts

Kevin Spears

Sound Editor

Alex Stevens

Stunts

John Michael Stewart

Stunts

Mark Strachan

Assistant Director

C.j. Strawn

Production Designer

Mick Strawn

Production Designer

Linda Syufy

On-Set Dresser

James Thornton

Sound

Michael Trcic

Special Makeup Effects

Steve Vandeman

Stunts

Peter Von Sholly

Storyboard Artist

David A Weinman

On-Set Dresser

Jeffrey Wetzel

Production Assistant

Richard B Whitaker

Technical Advisor

Jack White

Assistant Director

Steve Wolke

Special Effects

John R Woodward

Assistant Director

James A Wylie

Stand-In

Kevin Yagher

Special Makeup Effects

Film Details

Also Known As
Hidden
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror/Science-Fiction
Action
Crime
Horror
Thriller
Release Date
1987
Distribution Company
NEW LINE CINEMA (NEW LINE)
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

The Hidden


The Hidden (1987), a sci-fi horror, thriller from New Line Cinema, was given mild critical praise upon its original release, with Roger Ebert pronouncing it "efficient and original" and Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles Times calling it "as unstintingly violent as it is crudely ingenious." Unable to fully find its audience at the time, the film has since emerged as a cult favorite, described by James M. Silver in a 1992 retrospective in the Los Angeles Times as "outstanding."

The movie was written by Jim Kouf (author of the Richard Dreyfuss vehicle Stakeout, also 1987) under the pen name of Bob Hunt. The story concerns Los Angeles detective Thomas Beck (Michael Nouri) and FBI agent Lloyd Gallagher (Kyle MacLachlan), who are investigating the case of Jack DeVries (Chris Mulkey), an otherwise law-abiding citizen who abruptly robs a Wells Fargo bank and kills all the security guards.

It develops that DeVries is possessed by an alien, slug-like parasite that enters its hosts through the mouth. Its victims also include a comatose hospital patient (William Boyett), a stripper named Brenda (Claudia Christian), Beck's supervisor (Clarence Felder), another detective (Ed O'Ross), a presidential candidate (John McCann) and even a dog. Meanwhile, in a stunning development, agent Gallagher is revealed to be something other than his true self. Also in the cast are Clu Gulager and Katherine Cannon.

Kouf, who would direct several feature films and episodes of the NBC-TV series Grimm, had wanted to direct The Hidden, and when the studio turned him down he lost interest in the script. Jack Sholder, assigned to the project as director, re-wrote the screenplay to give it some depth and avoid making it "a straight-on, action shoot-'em-up type." Sholder, who also has credits as writer and film editor, chose The Hidden as his favorite directorial projects, which also have included Alone in the Dark (1982) and A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge (1985).

Sholder said in a 2015 interview with Fangoria.com that "I thought there was a very compelling story there. It was really about what it meant to be human... I wanted to shape it in that direction... Most of what you see is what Kouf wrote, but I sort of beefed up that end." Casting the leading roles was difficult, but good friends Kyle MacLachlan and Michael Nouri both liked the script and agreed to play the leads after auditioning together. Sholder considered MacLachlan to be "an inspired choice," but found Nouri "very difficult" to direct.

"It was probably the toughest situation I have ever had with an actor," Sholder said of working with Nouri. "After Flashdance (1983) I believe he thought he was going to be a big star. Now here he was in this little horror film by this little company... [He] was sort of diametrically opposed to everything I asked him to do." The same year of The Hidden, Nouri had turned down the lead in Lethal Weapon, which became a hugely successful franchise for Mel Gibson.

Sholder had high praise for Claudia Christian as Brenda, the stripper, describing her as "kind of a wild and crazy girl" who was "up for anything" and "really, really went for it." He considered her "iconic in the role," while Christian found her director to be "quirky." Christian said later that the filmmakers found her breasts "inadequate," so costumes were designed to emphasize her more imposing rear end. She suffered a scratched cornea during filming when material exploded from a prop gun, leaving her shy of such "weapons."

The scene in which the alien transfers from DeVries to the hospital patient was accomplished by stop-motion photography. William Boyett, who played the patient, was so repulsed by the scene where the alien enters his body through his mouth that he refused to sit through it and left the screening room.

A certain segment of the audience found The Hidden fascinating because of the cars used in the chase sequences. MacLachlan drives a beige Porsche 928, Mulkey a black Ferrari 308 GTB, Boyett a red Ferrari Mondial convertible, and Christian a light green 1980s Cadillac Sedan Deville.

The film has a score by Michael Convertino, and features more than a dozen songs including, "Is Anybody in There?" and "Say Goodbye" by Hunters and Collectors; and "Still in Hollywood," "Your Haunted Head" and "Over Your Shoulder" by Concrete Blonde. The soundtrack was released on the Varese Sarabande label.

The Hidden won several prizes and nominations in the 1988 awards season including: the Grand Prize at the Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival; a Best Director award to Sholder and a nomination as Best Film at Fantasporto; a Best Actor Award to Nouri; the Prize of the International Critics' Jury to Sholder at the Catalonian International Film Festival; and nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Actor (Nouri), Director (Sholder) and Writing (Kouf) at the Saturn Awards.

The movie was only a modest commercial success, grossing $9.7 million at the box office. But it since has come into its own in television showings and a DVD that is available through New Line Video. A sequel, The Hidden II, was directed by Seth Pinsker and released in 1993.

By Roger Fristoe
The Hidden

The Hidden

The Hidden (1987), a sci-fi horror, thriller from New Line Cinema, was given mild critical praise upon its original release, with Roger Ebert pronouncing it "efficient and original" and Kevin Thomas of the Los Angeles Times calling it "as unstintingly violent as it is crudely ingenious." Unable to fully find its audience at the time, the film has since emerged as a cult favorite, described by James M. Silver in a 1992 retrospective in the Los Angeles Times as "outstanding." The movie was written by Jim Kouf (author of the Richard Dreyfuss vehicle Stakeout, also 1987) under the pen name of Bob Hunt. The story concerns Los Angeles detective Thomas Beck (Michael Nouri) and FBI agent Lloyd Gallagher (Kyle MacLachlan), who are investigating the case of Jack DeVries (Chris Mulkey), an otherwise law-abiding citizen who abruptly robs a Wells Fargo bank and kills all the security guards. It develops that DeVries is possessed by an alien, slug-like parasite that enters its hosts through the mouth. Its victims also include a comatose hospital patient (William Boyett), a stripper named Brenda (Claudia Christian), Beck's supervisor (Clarence Felder), another detective (Ed O'Ross), a presidential candidate (John McCann) and even a dog. Meanwhile, in a stunning development, agent Gallagher is revealed to be something other than his true self. Also in the cast are Clu Gulager and Katherine Cannon. Kouf, who would direct several feature films and episodes of the NBC-TV series Grimm, had wanted to direct The Hidden, and when the studio turned him down he lost interest in the script. Jack Sholder, assigned to the project as director, re-wrote the screenplay to give it some depth and avoid making it "a straight-on, action shoot-'em-up type." Sholder, who also has credits as writer and film editor, chose The Hidden as his favorite directorial projects, which also have included Alone in the Dark (1982) and A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge (1985). Sholder said in a 2015 interview with Fangoria.com that "I thought there was a very compelling story there. It was really about what it meant to be human... I wanted to shape it in that direction... Most of what you see is what Kouf wrote, but I sort of beefed up that end." Casting the leading roles was difficult, but good friends Kyle MacLachlan and Michael Nouri both liked the script and agreed to play the leads after auditioning together. Sholder considered MacLachlan to be "an inspired choice," but found Nouri "very difficult" to direct. "It was probably the toughest situation I have ever had with an actor," Sholder said of working with Nouri. "After Flashdance (1983) I believe he thought he was going to be a big star. Now here he was in this little horror film by this little company... [He] was sort of diametrically opposed to everything I asked him to do." The same year of The Hidden, Nouri had turned down the lead in Lethal Weapon, which became a hugely successful franchise for Mel Gibson. Sholder had high praise for Claudia Christian as Brenda, the stripper, describing her as "kind of a wild and crazy girl" who was "up for anything" and "really, really went for it." He considered her "iconic in the role," while Christian found her director to be "quirky." Christian said later that the filmmakers found her breasts "inadequate," so costumes were designed to emphasize her more imposing rear end. She suffered a scratched cornea during filming when material exploded from a prop gun, leaving her shy of such "weapons." The scene in which the alien transfers from DeVries to the hospital patient was accomplished by stop-motion photography. William Boyett, who played the patient, was so repulsed by the scene where the alien enters his body through his mouth that he refused to sit through it and left the screening room. A certain segment of the audience found The Hidden fascinating because of the cars used in the chase sequences. MacLachlan drives a beige Porsche 928, Mulkey a black Ferrari 308 GTB, Boyett a red Ferrari Mondial convertible, and Christian a light green 1980s Cadillac Sedan Deville. The film has a score by Michael Convertino, and features more than a dozen songs including, "Is Anybody in There?" and "Say Goodbye" by Hunters and Collectors; and "Still in Hollywood," "Your Haunted Head" and "Over Your Shoulder" by Concrete Blonde. The soundtrack was released on the Varese Sarabande label. The Hidden won several prizes and nominations in the 1988 awards season including: the Grand Prize at the Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival; a Best Director award to Sholder and a nomination as Best Film at Fantasporto; a Best Actor Award to Nouri; the Prize of the International Critics' Jury to Sholder at the Catalonian International Film Festival; and nominations for Best Science Fiction Film, Best Actor (Nouri), Director (Sholder) and Writing (Kouf) at the Saturn Awards. The movie was only a modest commercial success, grossing $9.7 million at the box office. But it since has come into its own in television showings and a DVD that is available through New Line Video. A sequel, The Hidden II, was directed by Seth Pinsker and released in 1993. By Roger Fristoe

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 30, 1987

Released in United States on Video March 1988

Wide Release in United States October 30, 1987

Previewed in New York City October 16, 1987.

Released in United States on Video March 1988

Released in United States Fall October 30, 1987

Wide Release in United States October 30, 1987