Fire in the Sky


1h 49m 1993

Brief Synopsis

Based on the true story of an Arizona man who claims he was abducted by a UFO in the 1970s.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Cinema Research Corporation; City of Roseburg; Industrial Light + Magic; Nina Saxon Film Design; Panavision, Ltd.; Paramount Pictures; United States Department of Agriculture--Forest Service; Varese Sarabande
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures; Paramount Home Media; Paramount Pictures
Location
Roseburg, Oregon, USA; Oakland, Oregon, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Synopsis

Based on the true story of an Arizona man who claims he was abducted by a UFO in the 1970s.

Crew

Donald Abblett

Production Painter

Barbara Affonso

Set Decoration Supervisor (Ilm)

Aaron Albucher

Art Department Coordinator

Tim Alverson

Assistant Film Editor

Hip Amdahl

Other

Tim Andreasen

Props Maker

Bert Arena

Electrician

Bob Baron

Adr Mixer

William Barr

Construction Supervisor (Ilm)

Don Bassett

Transportation Co-Captain

Margo Baxley

Costume Supervisor

Laurence Bennett

Production Designer

Pamela Bentkowski

Supervising Foley Editor

James H Betts

Other

Sharon Bialy

Casting

Don Bies

Other

Todd Black

Producer

Patricia Blau

Executive In Charge Of Production (Ilm)

Linda Bloom-hedine

Craft Service

Jean Bolte

Puppeteer/Creature Technician (Ilm)

Robert Bonino

Construction Coordinator

Bob Bornstein

Music Preparation

Rocky Brooks

Production Assistant

Roger Brown

Song ("Guest Of Honor")

Ladonna Bubak

Production Assistant

Malcolm Burn

Song ("Sons And Daughters (Reprise)")

Wayne Campbell

Production Assistant

Wayne R Campbell

Transportation Coordinator

Robert C Campion

Accountant

Richard L Carden

Dolly Grip

Charles Carlsen

Construction Foreperson

Tom Carlson

Music Editor

Lane Caudell

Song ("Guest Of Honor")

Elle Chan

Other

Christine M Chapman

Other

Ken Chase

Makeup Artist

Charles J Clark

Other

Pat Clark

Boom Operator

Henry Cline

1st Assistant Photographer

Robert A Cooper

Puppeteer

Anne Couk

Assistant Sound Editor

James M. Cox

Assistant Chief Lighting Technician

Scott Crabbe

Video Assist

Wendy M Craig

Costumer

Tony Criscione

Assistant Accountant

Scot Cummings

Other

Mike Cunningham

Assistant Property Master

Gregroy J Curda

Foley Mixer

Christine Danelski

Foley Editor

Sandy De Crescent

Orchestra Conductor

Greg Dean

Apprentice Film Editor

Luis Delgado

Assistant (To James Garner)

Max Delgado

Production Assistant

Tim Dent

Property Person

Bryan Dewe

Puppeteer/Creature Technician (Ilm)

Dick Dova

1st Company Grip (Ilm)

Ken Dufva

Foley Artist

Adam Duthie

Production Assistant

Timothy Eaton

Visual Effects Editor (Ilm)

Jerri Ellis

Assistant Location Manager

Juno J. Ellis

Supervising Adr Editor

Jerry Enright

Rigging Lighting Technician

David Fein

Foley Artist

Freddy Fender

Song Performer ("Wasted Days And Wased Nights")

Robert Finley Iii

Chief Lighting Technician (Ilm)

James Fitzgerald

2nd Assistant Photographer

Joan Flannery

Post-Production Accountant

Mark Gambino

Grip

Hank Garfield

Sound Mixer

Larry M Garrison

Unit Publicist

John Gazdik

Camera Assistant (Ilm)

Brian Gernand

Chief Set Decorator (Ilm)

Dennis Glass

Additional Makeup

Wolfgang Glattes

Unit Production Manager

Wolfgang Glattes

Executive Producer

Chris Goehe

Puppeteer/Creature Technician (Ilm)

Clint Goldman

Producer (Ilm)

John Goodson

Chief Set Decorator (Ilm)

Douglas Greenfield

Dolby Stereo Consultant

Kurt Grossi

1st Company Grip

Betty Gumm

Assistant (To Producer)

Joanna Guzetta

Location Manager

Chris Haarhoff

Camera Operator

Ardell Hake

Additional Orchestrator

Glenn R Hale

Grip

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

J Michael Haynie

1st Assistant Director

Tom Henner

Production Assistant

Michael Herbick

Rerecording Mixer

Geoff Heron

Special Effects Foreperson (Ilm)

Phil Hetos

Color Timer

William R Hetzler

Production Assistant

Ed Hirsh

Stage Manager (Ilm)

Frank Howard

Sound Effects Editor

Steve Husch

Property Person

Joseph A Ippolito

Supervising Sound Editor

Mark Isham

Music

Patti James

Assistant (To Director)

Martin Jedlicka

2nd Assistant Director

E Erik Jensen

Puppeteer

Brad Jerrell

Assistant Chief Lighting Technician (Ilm)

Harley Jessup

Art Director (Ilm)

Evan Kanew

Production Assistant

Sandra Karpman

Supervisor

David Kohn

Electrician

Peter E Kozak

Production Assistant

James Krattiger

Electrician

Stephen Krause

Music Recorder And Mixer

Ken Kugler

Music Orchestrator And Conductor

Rock Barlett Lane

2nd Assistant Director

John Leimanis

Set Designer

John Leveque

Sound Effects Editor

Leonard Levitt

Puppeteer

Mark R Lilienthal

Special Effects

Alan E Lorimer

Special Effects Coordinator

Jeff Mann

Puppeteering/Creature Supervisor (Ilm)

Jeff Mann

Puppeteer

Mark Mansbridge

Art Director

Debra L. Manwiller

Casting

Kim Marks

Camera Operator (Ilm)

Bret Marnell

Assistant Film Editor

Dan May

Set Decorator

Anthony Mazzucchi

2nd Company Grip

Walter R. Mccormick Jr.

Projectionist

Huey P Meaux

Song ("Wasted Days And Wased Nights")

Carl Miller

Camera Assistant (Ilm)

Howard Miller

Assistant (To D B Sweeney)

Richard Miller

Other

Steve Mirkovich

Editor

Danea Mitchell

Song Performer ("Guest Of Honor")

Donald O Mitchell

Rerecording Mixer

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

Frank Montano

Rerecording Mixer

Mark Moore

Visual Effects Art Director (Ilm)

Jim Morris

General Manager (Ilm)

Wendy Lou Morton

Puppeteer

Lesley Moussette

Assistant (To Screenplay Writer)

Randy Musselman

Transportation Co-Captain

Molly Naughton

Visual Effects Coordinator (Ilm)

Dan Nelson

Special Effects Foreperson (Ilm)

Art Neville

Song ("Sons And Daughters (Reprise)")

Arthel Neville

Song ("Sons And Daughters (Reprise)")

Ian Neville

Song ("Sons And Daughters (Reprise)")

Lorraine Neville

Song ("Sons And Daughters (Reprise)")

Tom Numbers

Costumer

Michael Owens

Alien Sequence Designer/Visual Effects Supervisor

Richard Pagano

Casting

Nina Paskowitz

Hair Stylist

Steve Patterson

Props Maker

Joshua Pines

Supervisor

Drew Pinniger

Property Person

Bill Pope

Director Of Photography

Lambert Powell

Special Effects

Ray Quiroz

Script Supervisor

Katharine Rager

Assistant Production Coordinator

Brandon Ramos

Production Assistant

Pierre Remy

Caterer

Stephen E. Rivkin

Additional Film Editor

Charlene Roberson

James Garner'S Makeup

James W Roberts

Props Maker

Nilo Rodis-jamero

Co-Producer

Michael G Ross

Property Master

Neil Jay Saiger

Propmaker Foreperson

Martin Schaer

Camera Operator

Kim Scharnberg

Additional Orchestrator

Tom Schurke

Video Playback

Gregory Schwartz

Photography

Sunny Seibel

Local Casting

Mark S Siegel

Puppeteer

Patrick Simmons

Song ("Black Water")

Craig Sims

Assistant Sound Editor

Thomas W Small

Assistant Sound Editor

Bruce Stambler

Sound Effects Editor

Anthony Steere

Other

Paul H Stewart

Special Effects

Marc Strachan

Location Consultant

Robert Strauss

Co-Producer

Lisa Aimee Sturz

Puppeteer

Becky Sullivan

Adr Editor

Jeff Tabler

Extras Casting

Gary Tandrow

Chief Lighting Technician

Gregor Tavenner

1st Assistant Photographer

Debbie Tieman

Assistant Accountant

Joe I Tompkins

Costume Designer

Tracy Torme

Co-Producer

Tracy Torme

Screenwriter

Allen Toussaint

Song ("Blinded By Love")

Bruce Vecchitto

Supervisor

Amelia Vincent

2nd Assistant Photographer

Amy Vincent

Photography

Travis Walton

Book As Source Material ("The Walton Experience")

Linda Warren

Production Coordinator

Chuck Waters

Stunt Coordinator

Jim Waters

Stunts

Franz Waxman

Song ("A Message Of Murder")

Kelly Way

Electrician

Harold Weed

Other

Cary Weitz

Other

Webster Whinery

Stunts

Mike Whitehurst

2nd Company Grip (Ilm)

Film Details

MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1993
Production Company
Cinema Research Corporation; City of Roseburg; Industrial Light + Magic; Nina Saxon Film Design; Panavision, Ltd.; Paramount Pictures; United States Department of Agriculture--Forest Service; Varese Sarabande
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures; Paramount Home Media; Paramount Pictures
Location
Roseburg, Oregon, USA; Oakland, Oregon, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m

Articles

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Spring March 12, 1993

Released in United States on Video September 15, 1993

Feature acting debut for Georgia Emelin.

Completed shooting October 1, 1992.

Began shooting August 11, 1992.

Released in United States Spring March 12, 1993

Released in United States on Video September 15, 1993