Crossing Delancey


1h 37m 1988
Crossing Delancey

Brief Synopsis

An aging woman hires a matchmaker to find her independent granddaughter a man.

Film Details

Also Known As
Izzy et Sam
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1988
Location
New Jersey, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

Romantic drama about a single New York City woman and her quest to find the right man--but can an upscale intellectual employee find love with a pickle man?

Crew

Joshua Abeles

Other

Robert M Andres

Key Grip

Stan Bochner

Sound Editor

Daniel Boxer

Set Decorator

Brian Chavanne

Casting Associate

Paul Chihara

Music

Paul Chihara

Music Arranger

Peter Christian

Production Assistant

Gretchen Christopher

Song

Judy Claman

Casting

Kathryn Colbert

Other

Gregory D'agostino

Apprentice

Louis D'esposito

Assistant Director

Victor Denicola

Hairdresser

Pat Derousie

Assistant

Anthony Desposito

Production Assistant

Rick Dior

Sound

Run Dmc

Song

Run Dmc

Song Performer

Tony Dunne

Construction Coordinator

Barbara Ellis

Song

Suzy Elmiger

Assistant Editor

William Farber

Best Boy

P J Feerick

Transportation Co-Captain

Jack Fitzstephens

Music Editor

David Craig Forrest

Makeup

David J Frederick

Assistant Camera Operator

David Scott Gagnon

Property Master Assistant

Keith Gardner

Boom Operator

Francois Girbaud

Wardrobe

Marithe Girbaud

Wardrobe

Benny Goodman And His Orchestra

Song Performer

Marshall Grupp

Sound Editor

Quincy Gunderson

Craft Service

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Song

Ann Hasselbeck

Production Assistant

Brent Haywood

Construction

Patricia Doherty Hess

Location Manager

Jery Hewitt

Stunts

Ken Howard

Photography

Isham Jones

Music

Gus Kahn

Theme Lyrics

Jenny Kane

Production Assistant

Gail Kearns

Other

Mary C Kelly

Production Auditor

Quentin R King

Sound Editor

Thomas Kudlek

Dolly Grip

Fran Kumin

Casting

Paula Laurence

Song Performer

Dan Leigh

Production Designer

Lee Lighting Ltd

Lighting

Harry Madsen

Stunts

William C. Mcconnell Jr.

Production Assistant

Martha Mericka

Dga Trainee

Danny Michael

Sound

Roseann Milano

Wardrobe Supervisor

Susie Money

Costumes

Phil Neilson

Stunt Coordinator

Michael Nozik

Unit Production Manager

Michael Nozik

Producer

Nellie Nugiel

Associate Producer

Mick O'rourke

Stunts

Pat Oleszko

Other

Pat Oleszko

Song Performer

Pat Oleszko

Song

Peggy Parker

Property Master

Thomas Reilly

Transportation Captain

Lisa Rhodes

Production Assistant

Sandy Richman

Stunts

David Roche

Song

Margaret A Roche

Song

Suzzy Roche

Song

Terre Roche

Song

Richard Rodgers

Song

Marc Rogers

Gaffer

Leslie Rollins

Art Director

Mike Russo

Stunts

Rita Ryack

Costume Designer

Robert L Sabah

Production Assistant

Susan Sandler

Play As Source Material

Susan Sandler

Screenplay

Frank Serrano

Production Assistant

Rick Shaine

Editor

Raphael Silver

Executive Producer

Meg Simon

Casting

C J Simpson

Assistant Art Director

Ginger Sledge

Production Assistant

Ellie Smith

Production Assistant

John Sosenko

Camera Operator

Michael Stockton

Scenic Artist

Chris Stoia

Assistant Director

Timothy Sullivan

Other

Chris Tergesen

Music

Paul Trejo

Music Editor

Leo Trombetta

Sound Editor

Gary Troxel

Song

Leslie Urdang

Assistant

Theo Van De Sande

Other

Theo Van De Sande

Director Of Photography

Susan Wagner

Sound Editor

Margot E Weiser

Production Assistant

Tom Wright

Stunts

Tom Yatsko

Assistant Camera Operator

Nike Zachmanoglou

Script Supervisor

Film Details

Also Known As
Izzy et Sam
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
1988
Location
New Jersey, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

Crossing Delancey


An amiable romantic comedy with a distinctly New York flavor, Crossing Delancey is the story of thirtyish, single Isabelle Grossman (Amy Irving) from the city's lower east side, who has moved uptown for what she considers a more sophisticated life, working in a bookstore and considering an affair with a pretentious, married writer. But Izzy's "bubbie" (grandmother) has other plans, and conspires with a matchmaker to find a suitable husband for her beloved granddaughter. Enter Sam (Peter Riegert), the friendly neighborhood pickle merchant, who has a plan of his own to woo and win Izzy.

Crossing Delancey was the fourth feature film directed by Joan Micklin Silver, and her second film about the New York Jewish-American experience. Silver had moved to New York from Cleveland, but after writing and directing several award-winning short films she was unable to make the leap to features. Instead, her husband raised money and produced his wife's feature directing debut, Hester Street (1975), about Jewish immigrants living in the lower east side in the last years of the nineteenth century. The indie film was well-received, and Joan Micklin Silver's career was launched.

Like all of Silver's films, Crossing Delancey is perfectly cast with a vibrant mix of moderately well-known actors and unfamiliar ones, who all inhabit their roles. The daughter of a theater director and an actress, Amy Irving made her film debut in 1976's Carrie and was nominated for an Academy Award® as best supporting actress for Yentl (1983). Her performance in Crossing Delancey earned Irving a Golden Globe nomination as best actress. Peter Riegert's easy charm and everyman looks make him ideal as Izzy's unlikely Prince Charming.

The grandmother in Crossing Delancey could have been the offspring of the main characters in Silver's Hester Street. She is played by Reizl Bozyk, a Polish-born veteran of the Yiddish stage, making a delightful film debut at the age of seventy-three. Bozyk had been performing since the age of five in Europe, and she and her husband were touring in Argentina when the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939. The family made their way to New York, where they worked for decades in Yiddish theater. Bozyk did not play her first stage role in English until after she appeared in Crossing Delancey. She never made another film, but continued to work on stage until shortly before her death in 1993.

Sylvia Miles had received two supporting actress Oscar nominations for playing aging, hard-edged, sexually-voracious women in Midnight Cowboy (1969) and Farewell My Lovely (1975). In Crossing Delancey, as a motormouth Jewish matchmaker in cahoots with Bubbie, Miles took off her girdle and delivered a performance that's pure fun. Look for David Hyde Pierce (billed as "David Pierce"), who later played Niles Crane on the television series Frazier, as Izzy's co-worker, and Suzzy Roche of the musical group the Roches as Izzy's friend Marilyn, whom she fixes up with Sam on a blind date. The Roches also contributed several songs to the soundtrack.

While a few critics found Crossing Delancey a formulaic rom-com, others liked the film's sense of place and the charm of the characters. Sheila Benson of the Los Angeles Times called it "at once hip and romantic; wittily sophisticated and unabashedly affectionate; a love poem to all of New York." In the New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote that the film managed to "combine a down-to-earth, contemporary outlook with the dreaminess of a fairy tale."

Director: Joan Micklin Silver
Producer: Raphael Silver, Michael Nozik
Screenplay: Susan Sandler, based on her play
Cinematography: Theo Van de Sande
Editor: Rick Shaine
Costume Design: Rita Ryack
Art Direction: Dan Leigh, Leslie E. Rollins
Music: Paul Chihara, additional songs by the Roches
Principal Cast: Amy Irving (Isabelle Grossman), Peter Riegert (Sam Posner), Jeroen Krabbe (Anton Maes), Reizl Bozyk (Bubbie), Sylvia Miles (Hannah Mandelbaum), George Martin (Lionel), John Bedford Lloyd (Nick), Amy Wright (Ricky), Fay Grant (Candyce), Suzzy Roche (Marilyn), Deborah Offner (Karen)
97 minutes

by Margarita Landazuri
Crossing Delancey

Crossing Delancey

An amiable romantic comedy with a distinctly New York flavor, Crossing Delancey is the story of thirtyish, single Isabelle Grossman (Amy Irving) from the city's lower east side, who has moved uptown for what she considers a more sophisticated life, working in a bookstore and considering an affair with a pretentious, married writer. But Izzy's "bubbie" (grandmother) has other plans, and conspires with a matchmaker to find a suitable husband for her beloved granddaughter. Enter Sam (Peter Riegert), the friendly neighborhood pickle merchant, who has a plan of his own to woo and win Izzy. Crossing Delancey was the fourth feature film directed by Joan Micklin Silver, and her second film about the New York Jewish-American experience. Silver had moved to New York from Cleveland, but after writing and directing several award-winning short films she was unable to make the leap to features. Instead, her husband raised money and produced his wife's feature directing debut, Hester Street (1975), about Jewish immigrants living in the lower east side in the last years of the nineteenth century. The indie film was well-received, and Joan Micklin Silver's career was launched. Like all of Silver's films, Crossing Delancey is perfectly cast with a vibrant mix of moderately well-known actors and unfamiliar ones, who all inhabit their roles. The daughter of a theater director and an actress, Amy Irving made her film debut in 1976's Carrie and was nominated for an Academy Award® as best supporting actress for Yentl (1983). Her performance in Crossing Delancey earned Irving a Golden Globe nomination as best actress. Peter Riegert's easy charm and everyman looks make him ideal as Izzy's unlikely Prince Charming. The grandmother in Crossing Delancey could have been the offspring of the main characters in Silver's Hester Street. She is played by Reizl Bozyk, a Polish-born veteran of the Yiddish stage, making a delightful film debut at the age of seventy-three. Bozyk had been performing since the age of five in Europe, and she and her husband were touring in Argentina when the Nazis invaded Poland in 1939. The family made their way to New York, where they worked for decades in Yiddish theater. Bozyk did not play her first stage role in English until after she appeared in Crossing Delancey. She never made another film, but continued to work on stage until shortly before her death in 1993. Sylvia Miles had received two supporting actress Oscar nominations for playing aging, hard-edged, sexually-voracious women in Midnight Cowboy (1969) and Farewell My Lovely (1975). In Crossing Delancey, as a motormouth Jewish matchmaker in cahoots with Bubbie, Miles took off her girdle and delivered a performance that's pure fun. Look for David Hyde Pierce (billed as "David Pierce"), who later played Niles Crane on the television series Frazier, as Izzy's co-worker, and Suzzy Roche of the musical group the Roches as Izzy's friend Marilyn, whom she fixes up with Sam on a blind date. The Roches also contributed several songs to the soundtrack. While a few critics found Crossing Delancey a formulaic rom-com, others liked the film's sense of place and the charm of the characters. Sheila Benson of the Los Angeles Times called it "at once hip and romantic; wittily sophisticated and unabashedly affectionate; a love poem to all of New York." In the New York Times, Janet Maslin wrote that the film managed to "combine a down-to-earth, contemporary outlook with the dreaminess of a fairy tale." Director: Joan Micklin Silver Producer: Raphael Silver, Michael Nozik Screenplay: Susan Sandler, based on her play Cinematography: Theo Van de Sande Editor: Rick Shaine Costume Design: Rita Ryack Art Direction: Dan Leigh, Leslie E. Rollins Music: Paul Chihara, additional songs by the Roches Principal Cast: Amy Irving (Isabelle Grossman), Peter Riegert (Sam Posner), Jeroen Krabbe (Anton Maes), Reizl Bozyk (Bubbie), Sylvia Miles (Hannah Mandelbaum), George Martin (Lionel), John Bedford Lloyd (Nick), Amy Wright (Ricky), Fay Grant (Candyce), Suzzy Roche (Marilyn), Deborah Offner (Karen) 97 minutes by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 24, 1988

Released in United States August 31, 1988

Released in United States on Video April 12, 1989

Released in United States 1988

Released in United States September 16, 1988

Released in United States November 12, 1988

Released in United States April 1998

Shown at Montreal World Film Festival August 24-September 4, 1988.

Shown at Boston Film Festival September 16, 1988.

Shown at London Film Festival November 12, 1988.

Shown at USA Film Festival in Dallas April 16-23, 1998.

Began shooting October 12, 1987.

Todd-AO

Released in United States August 31, 1988 (Los Angeles)

Released in United States on Video April 12, 1989

Released in United States 1988 (Shown at Montreal World Film Festival August 24-September 4, 1988.)

Released in United States September 16, 1988 (Shown at Boston Film Festival September 16, 1988.)

Released in United States November 12, 1988 (Shown at London Film Festival November 12, 1988.)

Released in United States April 1998 (Shown at USA Film Festival in Dallas April 16-23, 1998.)

Released in United States Summer August 24, 1988