Beauty and the Beast


1h 24m 1991

Brief Synopsis

An arrogant nobleman is turned into a beast and, in order to break the spell, he tries to win the love of a village girl.

Film Details

Also Known As
Belle en het Beest, Belle et la BĂȘte, La Belle et la Bete
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Synopsis

An arrogant nobleman is turned into a beast and, in order to break the spell, he tries to win the love of a village girl.

Crew

John Aardal

Camera Operator

John Aardal

Camera

Beverly Adams

Other

Sue Adnopoz

Animator

Walter Afanasieff

Song

Graham S Alan

Other

Gretchen Maschmeyer Albrecht

Animator

Gretchen Maschmeyer Albrecht

Production Manager

Tim Allen

Animator

Roger Allers

Art Department

Carmen Regina Alvarez

Other

Vanessa Theme Ament

Foley Artist

Todd H Ammons

Assistant

Raul E Anaya

Other

Bruce R Anderson

Other

Mary Anderson

Visual Effects

Scott Anderson

Assistant

Scott Anderson

Animator

Jonathan Annand

Inbetweener

Tony Anselmo

Animator

Ruben Azama Aquino

Animator

Virgilio John Aquino

Other

Debra Armstrong

Other

John A Armstrong

Visual Effects

J H Arrufat

Sound Editor

Kelly Asbury

Visual Effects Designer

Kelly Asbury

Story By

Howard Ashman

Song

Howard Ashman

Executive Producer

Howard Ashman

Other

Barry Atkinson

Other

Mary Jo Ayers

Assistant

William Aylsworth

Camera Operator

Rasoul Azadani

Other

Hans Bacher

Production Consultant

Kathleen M Bailey

Assistant

Dorothea Baker

Assistant

Gordon Baker

Visual Effects

Tina Baldwin

Camera Operator

Doug Ball

Other

Tom Bancroft

Assistant

Tony Bancroft

Animator

Arland Barron

Animator

Arland Barron

Assistant

Mark Barrows

Effects Assistant

Ron Bartlett

Sound Editor

James Baxter

Animator

Noreen Beasley

Other

Jeff Beazley

Other

Christine Beck

Other

Linda Bel

Animator

Carl A Bell

Animator

Michael J. Benavente

Sound Editor

Bob Bennett

Visual Effects

Kathleen Bennett

Music Editor

Theresa Bentz

Other

Bill Berg

Other

Mitchell Bernal

Effects Assistant

Mitchell Bernal

Layout Artist

Ronald C Betta

Production Assistant

Kennard F Betts

Inbetweener

Derek C Billings

Production Assistant

Patricia Billings

Other

Phyllis Bird

Other

Denis Blackerby

Sound Dubbing

Aaron Blaise

Animator

Travis Blaise

Inbetweener

Russell Blandino

Other

Mary Blee

Assistant Editor

Baker Bloodworth

Production Manager

Allen Blyth

Effects Assistant

Kirk Bodyfelt

Production Assistant

Geefwee Boedoe

Animator

Michael Bolds

Other

Nicolette Bonnell

Animator

Jason Boose

Inbetweener

David A Bossert

Art Department

David A Bossert

Animator

Dan Boulos

Animator

Elliot M Bour

Inbetweener

Rejean Bourdages

Animator

Stephen Bove

Other

Verell Bowers

Inbetweener

Daniel Bowman

Assistant

Philip S Boyd

Animator

David Braden

2-D Animator

Mike Brassell

Production Assistant

Holly E Bratton

Production Assistant

April Brennan

Other

Jo Ann Breuer

Camera Operator

Eduardo Brieno

Other

Ernesto Brieno

Inbetweener

Kevin L Briggs

Production Assistant

Paul Briggs

Effects Assistant

Darrell L Brown

Production Accountant

Kristine Brown

Inbetweener

Janet Bruce

Digital Effects Supervisor

Robert Bryan

Assistant

Peabo Bryson

Song Performer

Robbie Buchanan

Song

Kirsten A Bulmer

Production Coordinator

David Burgess

Animator

Kimberly Burk

Effects Assistant

David Candiff

Post-Production Supervisor

Thomas Cardone

Visual Effects

Wayne Carlisi

Animator

John L Carnochan

Editor

Vince Caro

Adr Mixer

Vince Caro

Adr/Dialogue Editor

John K Carr

Associate Editor

Randy Cartwright

Animator

John Cashman

Inbetweener

Rozanne Cazian

Production Coordinator

Michael Cedeno

Animator

Michael Cedeno

Visual Effects Designer

Dan Chaika

Effects Assistant

Greg Chalekian

Production Assistant

Brenda Chapman

Story By

Lillian Chapman

Inbetweener

Emile Charlap

Music Contractor

Ray Chen

Assistant

Karen China

Camera Operator

Inna Chon

Other

Anthony M Cipriano

Inbetweener

Casey Clayton

Other

Staphanie L Clifford

Camera Coordinator

Brian Clift

Other

Merry Kanawyer Clingen

Animator

Susan M Coffer

Other

Ed Coffey

Animator

Ron Cohee

Assistant

Bob Cohen

Camera Operator

Shawn Colbeck

Assistant

Jim Coleman

Other

Beth Collins-stegmaier

Editor

Karen Comella

Color

Patricia Conklin

Assistant

Carole Constantineau

Production Accountant

Lorna Cook

Animator

Harlene Cooper-mears

Other

Ken Cope

Assistant

Robert O Corley

Other

Jesus Cortes

Animator

Annamarie Costa

Other

Penny Coulter

Assistant

Fred Craig

Other

Jeannette Cremarosa

Other

Don Crum

Other

Lynnette Cullen

Camera Operator

Kent Culotta

Inbetweener

Kent Culotta

Animator

John R Cunningham

Digital Effects Supervisor

Sherrie Cuzzort

Other

Margie Daniels

Assistant

Jamal M Davis

Other

James A Davis

Animator

Ron Defelice

Other

Vincent Defrances

Inbetweener

Andreas Deja

Animator

Lou Dellarosa

Assistant

William Dely

Visual Effects

Paulino Garcia Demingo

Other

Peter Demund

Inbetweener

Leyla C Depelaez

Other

John Derderian

Camera Operator

Anthony Derosa

Animator

Charlie Desrochers

Production Coordinator

Jeff Dickson

Effects Assistant

Celine Dion

Song Performer

Marcia Kimura Dougherty

Animator

Joan Doyle

Visual Effects

Brett Drogmund

Production Assistant

Gregory Alexander Drolette

Other

Nanette K Drumtra

Production Assistant

Debbie Dubois

Visual Effects

Natasha Dukelski Selfridge

Animator

Juliet Duncan

Animator

Ken Stuart Duncan

Animator

Jeff Dutton

Effects Assistant

Russ Edmonds

Animator

Teresa Eidenbock

Animator

Leslie Ellery

Color

Tom Ellery

Story By

Tyrone J Elliott

Effects Assistant

John Emerson

Other

Thom Enriquez

Other

Julia Evershade

Sound Editor

Geoffrey C Everts

Effects Assistant

Sam Ewing

Assistant

William Fadness

Camera Operator

Diana Falk

Other

Shannon Fallis-kane

Visual Effects

Shannon Fallis-kane

Assistant

Rick Farmiloe

Animator

Michael Farrow

Song

Brian Ferguson

Assistant

Phyllis Estelle Fields

Other

Cindy Finn

Color

Will Finn

Animator

Trey Finney

Animator

Film Details

Also Known As
Belle en het Beest, Belle et la BĂȘte, La Belle et la Bete
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1991
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Award Wins

Best Score

1991

Best Song

1991

Award Nominations

Best Picture

1991

Best Song

1991

Best Sound

1991

Articles

Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bete) - Beauty and the Beast


Jean Cocteau (1889 - 1963) was a rare filmmaker, for he proudly aligned himself with poetry above all else. He was a true romantic, painter, sculptor, novelist, playwright, surrealist, and an active member of the Parisian art scene. Not surprisingly, Cocteau saw the artist alone as being able to achieve immortality via a body of work that is not prone to aging or mortality. With this in mind, he was the perfect man to helm the kind of fairy-tale whose main subject is a magical Beast who lives beyond the sphere of mere mortals.

Cocteau's version of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST concerns Belle, played by Josette Day, who lives at home with her two mean sisters, a brother, and father. When the latter stumbles across the Beast's castle he is taken prisoner and told he will die unless he can sacrifice one of his daughters to take his place. Of course, the mean sisters balk at the idea and the old man figures he's old and ill and might as well be the one to fulfill the obligation. But the beautiful Belle slips out and assumes her father's place at the Beast's castle.

The visuals, influenced by Gustav Dore's illustrations, are striking even today, and this despite the many films that have mimicked their effect. In fact, some of the dreamlike moments play through in complete silence and feel completely fresh because of it (nowadays the obligatory musical score seems to permeate throughout). But the real star of the film is the Beast, played by Jean Marais (who also plays Belle's original suitor and the Prince at the end). According to Roger Ebert, it was Marlene Dietrich who held Cocteau's hand at the film's debut screening and who, at the stories resolution, called out toward the screen "Where is my beautiful Beast?" According to Pauline Kael that quote came from Greta Garbo. Either way, it fulfilled Cocteau's desire "to make the Beast so human, so sympathetic, so superior to men, that his transformation into Prince Charming would come as a terrible blow to Beauty."

Now that a restored 35mm print of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, distributed by Cowboy Pictures, is playing in limited theatrical engagements, Cocteau's work of art continues its life as intended, on the big screen at 1.33:1, in front of collective audiences again, proving that the French poet's notions of immortality were more than just a passing fancy.

Recently the Criterion Collection released BEAUTY AND THE BEAST on DVD (in a high-definition digital transfer made from restored film elements) with a dazzling array of special features. These include two commentary tracks (one by film historian Arthur Knight and the other by writer Christopher Frayling, an interview with cinematographer Henri Alekan, rare behind the scenes stills and publicity materials, the original opera written for the film by composer Philip Glass and many more extra features). To purchase a copy of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, go to TCM Shopping.

by Pablo Kjolseth
Beauty And The Beast  (La Belle Et La Bete) - Beauty And The Beast

Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bete) - Beauty and the Beast

Jean Cocteau (1889 - 1963) was a rare filmmaker, for he proudly aligned himself with poetry above all else. He was a true romantic, painter, sculptor, novelist, playwright, surrealist, and an active member of the Parisian art scene. Not surprisingly, Cocteau saw the artist alone as being able to achieve immortality via a body of work that is not prone to aging or mortality. With this in mind, he was the perfect man to helm the kind of fairy-tale whose main subject is a magical Beast who lives beyond the sphere of mere mortals. Cocteau's version of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST concerns Belle, played by Josette Day, who lives at home with her two mean sisters, a brother, and father. When the latter stumbles across the Beast's castle he is taken prisoner and told he will die unless he can sacrifice one of his daughters to take his place. Of course, the mean sisters balk at the idea and the old man figures he's old and ill and might as well be the one to fulfill the obligation. But the beautiful Belle slips out and assumes her father's place at the Beast's castle. The visuals, influenced by Gustav Dore's illustrations, are striking even today, and this despite the many films that have mimicked their effect. In fact, some of the dreamlike moments play through in complete silence and feel completely fresh because of it (nowadays the obligatory musical score seems to permeate throughout). But the real star of the film is the Beast, played by Jean Marais (who also plays Belle's original suitor and the Prince at the end). According to Roger Ebert, it was Marlene Dietrich who held Cocteau's hand at the film's debut screening and who, at the stories resolution, called out toward the screen "Where is my beautiful Beast?" According to Pauline Kael that quote came from Greta Garbo. Either way, it fulfilled Cocteau's desire "to make the Beast so human, so sympathetic, so superior to men, that his transformation into Prince Charming would come as a terrible blow to Beauty." Now that a restored 35mm print of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, distributed by Cowboy Pictures, is playing in limited theatrical engagements, Cocteau's work of art continues its life as intended, on the big screen at 1.33:1, in front of collective audiences again, proving that the French poet's notions of immortality were more than just a passing fancy. Recently the Criterion Collection released BEAUTY AND THE BEAST on DVD (in a high-definition digital transfer made from restored film elements) with a dazzling array of special features. These include two commentary tracks (one by film historian Arthur Knight and the other by writer Christopher Frayling, an interview with cinematographer Henri Alekan, rare behind the scenes stills and publicity materials, the original opera written for the film by composer Philip Glass and many more extra features). To purchase a copy of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST, go to TCM Shopping. by Pablo Kjolseth

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Received Golden Globe (1991) awards for Best Film (Musical or Comedy), Best Score and Best Song from the Hollywood Foreign Press Association.

Received special animation award from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association (1991).

Received special animation award from the National Board of Review (1991).

Released in United States Fall November 13, 1991

Limited Release in United States November 13, 1991

Limited Release in United States November 15, 1991

Wide Release in United States November 22, 1991

Re-released in United States January 1, 2002

Re-released in United States Winter January 13, 2012

Released in United States on Video October 30, 1992

Released in United States 1991

Released in United States October 1991

Shown at New York Film Festival September 20 - October 6, 1991 as a "work-in-progress".

Shown at ShowEast in Atlantic City October 22-24, 1991.

The Broadway stage musical, based on the film, was launched in 1994, and as of December 2001, is still playing in New York after more than 3,000 performances.

Feature directorial debut for animators Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise, who previously collaborated on "Cranium Command," a four-minute short for EPCOT Center's Wonders of Life pavilion.

Completed shooting November 1991.

Began shooting July 1, 1990.

The 30th animated feature to carry the Disney name.

Selected in 2002 for inclusion in the Library of Congress' National Film Registry.

The original duo hired to develop and direct "Beauty and the Beast" were British husband-and-wife team Richard and Jill Purdum.

Film noted "To our friend, Howard, who gave a mermaid her voice and a beast his soul, we will be forever grateful. Howard Ashman 1950-1991." Songwriter Howard Ashman died on March 14, 1991 from complications related to AIDS.

Actor Robby Benson began his career as a voice-over artist at age 11, and has dubbed nearly 30 foreign films into English.

Released in United States Fall November 13, 1991 (2500+ Digital 3D)

Limited Release in United States November 13, 1991 (New York City)

Limited Release in United States November 15, 1991 (Los Angeles)

Wide Release in United States November 22, 1991

Re-released in United States January 1, 2002 (large format version)

Re-released in United States Winter January 13, 2012

Released in United States on Video October 30, 1992

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at New York Film Festival September 20 - October 6, 1991 as a "work-in-progress".)

Released in United States October 1991 (Shown at ShowEast in Atlantic City October 22-24, 1991.)