Article 99


1h 39m 1992

Brief Synopsis

The story of a dedicated and ambitious doctor at a V.A. hospital who refuses to turn people away or lower the level of care.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Production Company
David Gilmore
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Kansas City, Missouri, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m

Synopsis

The story of a dedicated and ambitious doctor at a V.A. hospital who refuses to turn people away or lower the level of care.

Crew

John Allen

Director Of Photography

Carlos Amador

Makeup Assistant

Terence Anderson

Assistant Editor

Joni Avery

Stunts

Rick Avery

Stunt Coordinator

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Craig E Bagley

Assistant

Jody L Ball

Production Assistant

Steve Bartek

Music Arranger

Brendy Bauman

Other

Mayor Richard Berkley

Thanks

Steve Bernstein

Apprentice

Kenneth Berry

Driver

Bruce Birmelin

Photography

Janet E Bosak

Medic

Richard Bowen

Director Of Photography

N Wayne Bradhurst

Production Assistant

Ronald N Bradhurst

Production Assistant

Charles Brewer

Stunts

Ken Brilliant

Makeup

Jophery Brown

Stunts

Ronald K Browning

Driver

Albert J Burnes

Stand-In

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Stu Cantor

Music Supervisor

A Charles Carnaggio

Assistant Property Master

Andrw W Carson

Production Assistant

Scott Childers

Grip

John C Ching

Production Assistant

K.c. Colwell

Assistant Director

Steve A Como

Driver

David D Connolly

Foreman

Matthew W Connolly

Carpenter

Adam Cook

Other

James E Coombes

Production Assistant

Linda Corbin

Foley Recordist

Lamont Cox

Stunts

Robert E. Craft

Location Manager

Devon Curry

Adr Editor

Ron Cutler

Screenplay

Brian Daniel

Grip

Richard W Dean

Carpenter

Charlie Decoursey

Production Assistant

Murray Deutch

Music Supervisor

Rudy Dillon

Costume Designer

Edward E Dischner

Carpenter

Captain Lloyd A Dograffenreid

Special Thanks To

Connie W Dolph

Post-Production Accountant

Eddy Donno

Stunts

Rob Doumitt

Best Boy

Keith Dowell

Carpenter

Mitch Dubin

Camera Operator

Maurice Dunster

Assistant

Laura Eisen

Other

Danny Elfman

Music

Joaquin Elizalde

Assistant Sound Editor

John Elizalde

Sound Designer

Tom Elliott

Stunts

Leslie Engle

Production Assistant

William L Fambrough

Electrician

Marc Farley

Electrician

Patti Fidelibus

Music Contractor

Marc Fisichella

Art Director

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Carol A Fleming

Music

Gail Foreman

Assistant Production Accountant

Joel Franklin

Music

Ron Freeby

On-Set Dresser

Leigh French

Voice Casting

Giacomo Ghiazza

Storyboard Artist

David Gilmore

Cable Operator

Stephen J Goldblatt

Scenic Artist

Karen Golden

Script Supervisor

Judy-anne Goldman

Extras Casting Assistant

Chuck Gorden

Production Assistant

Roy Grace

Production

Melvin L Graham

Electrician

Ray Greenfield

Assistant Director

Michael Greenwood

Set Production Assistant

Michael F Grinage

Grip

Michael Gruskoff

Producer

Paul H Haines

Special Effects Assistant

Colleen Halsey

Editor

Richard Halsey

Editor

Robin Harlan

Foley Artist

Colin Harold

Carpenter

Kelly Rae Hemenway

Other

Al Hersh

Transportation Coordinator

Martin E Herst

Carpenter

Debbie Hijar

Assistant Editor

Jacqueline Hill

Assistant

A E Hockman Ii

Advisor

Mark E Hollingsworth

Property Master

Mark Hopkins

Other

Carrie Hughes

Other

Brad Humston

Carpenter

Richard Janssen

Other

Jerry F Johnson

Driver

Marci R Johnson

Wardrobe Assistant

Pops Johnson

Driver

Pops Johnson

Production Assistant

Michelle Johnston

Choreographer

Melvin Jones

Stunts

Paula Jordan

Production Assistant

Doc Kane

Adr

Beverly Klein

Costumes

Mary Pat Kloster

Accounting Assistant

C Darin Knight

Sound Mixer

Wyatt Knight

Stunts

Joyce Kogut

Wardrobe Assistant

Greg Kornbacher

Other

Stella Juzefczyk Kornbacher

Other

Jon L Kraft

Production Assistant

George R Kuhn

On-Set Dresser

Doreen Lane

Casting Associate

Laura Langdon

Makeup Assistant

Susan Lawrence

Production Assistant

James Leblanc

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael I. Levy

Producer

Jack Lillie

Other

Laura Nelson Lombardi

Location Casting

Christine Lucas

Production Assistant

Diana Lugo

Technical Advisor

Bruce Macbain

Stand-In

Richard Majka

Production Assistant

Leonard Makowka

Advisor

Eric Mansker

Stunts

Andrew Jeff Mart

Steadicam Operator

Lisa Matsukawa

Production Coordinator

Marco Mazzei

Assistant Camera Operator

Matthew D Mccaine

Production Assistant

Robert Mccaine

Production Assistant

Mark Mccarthy

Production Assistant

Susan Mcclean

Music

Allen Mcelwain

Driver

Cole Mckay

Stunts

Shelly E Mcknight

Other

Earl Mclaughlin

Driver

Tim Mcleod

Electrician

Jimmy Medearis

Stunts

Stu Merrell

Carpenter

Kim Minnick

Craft Service

Bob Minor

Stunts

Sarah Monat

Foley Artist

Helene Mulholland

Post-Production Supervisor

Shawn Murphy

Music

Andy Myers

Production Assistant

David Osborn

Production Assistant

Jeff T Owens

Construction Coordinator

Troy Paddock

Electrician

Steve Peltzman

On-Set Dresser

Jason Peoples

Production Assistant

Ron Pipes

Makeup

Jerry Pirozzi

Foley Editor

Duane M Polca

Carpenter

Max Popper

Dolly Grip

Richard Portman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Cynthia A Potthast

Assistant Director

Roger J Pugliese

Associate Producer

Roger J Pugliese

Unit Production Manager

Cynthia Quan

Production Accountant

Karen Rae

Casting

Virginia Randolph-weaver

Production Designer

Darin Raney

Art Department Coordinator

Terry Rausch

Carpenter

Karen Ray

Casting

Scott Ressler

Assistant Camera Operator

Christa Reusch-simmons

Makeup Artist

Sharon Rice

Assistant

Steve Rice

Sound Effects Editor

Jeffrey A Richardson

Other

Michael Richardson

Other

Cynthia Riddle

Assistant Director

Jacobus Rose

Post-Production Supervisor

Sean Rush

Boom Operator

Lane G Russell

Assistant Camera Operator

Erik Schaper

Makeup

Roycee Schlotzhauer

Electrician

Chad D Schofield

Other

Charles J Schray

Dolly Grip

Bradford Schultze

Production Assistant

Steve Schwarz

Carpenter

Edward Seaman

Electrician

Joe Seaman

Carpenter

Lisa Sgroe

Assistant

Patrick Shellenberger

Gaffer

Gary Shepherd

Dialogue Editor

Steve Sheridan

Color Timer

Mark Smith

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Steve F.b. Smith

Consultant

Bruce Spellman

Key Grip

Elena Spiotta

Associate Producer

Rooh Steif

Assistant Production Coordinator

Larry Stensvold

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

James S Stewart

Rerecording

Patrick Stewart

Electrician

Thomas R Stiller

Set Designer

David Stinnett

Makeup

Robert Allen Stinson

Other

Sarah Stone

Set Decorator

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Production Company
David Gilmore
Distribution Company
Orion Pictures
Location
Kansas City, Missouri, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m

Articles

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)


Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72.

Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others.

Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981).

By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama.

His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role.

In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham (1931-2004)

Noble Willingham, the gruffly voiced character actor best known for his role as saloon owner C.D. Parker on Chuck Norris' long-running series Walker, Texas Ranger, died of natural causes on January 17th at his Palm Springs home. He was 72. Born on August 31, 1931 in Mineola, Texas, Willingham was educated at North Texas State University where he earned a degree in Economics. He later taught government and economics at a high school in Houston, leaving his life-long dreams of becoming an actor on hold until the opportunity presented itself. Such an opportunity happened when in late 1970, Peter Bogdonovich was doing some on-location shooting in south Texas for The Last Picture Show (1971); at the urging of some friends, he audition and won a small role in the picture. From there, Willingham slowly began to find work in some prominent films, including Bogdonovich's Paper Moon (1973), and Roman Polanski's Chinatown (1974). Around this time, Willingham kept busy with many guest appearances on a variety of popular shows: Bonanza, Gunsmoke, The Waltons, The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Rockford Files and several others. Critics didn't take notice of his acting abilities until he landed the role of Leroy Mason, the soulless plant manager who stares down Sally Field in Norma Rae (1979). Few could forget him screaming at her, "Lady, I want you off the premises now!" with unapologetic malice. It may have not been a likable character, but after this stint, better roles came along, most notably the corrupt Dr. Fenster in Robert Redford's prison drama Brubaker (1980); and the evil sheriff in the thriller The Howling (1981). By the late '80s, Willingham was an in-demand character actor, and he scored in three hit films: a border patrol sergeant - a great straight man to Cheech Marin - in the ethnic comedy Born in East L.A.; his wonderfully avuncular performance as General Taylor, the military brass who was sympathetic to an unorthodox disc jockey in Saigon, played by Robin Williams in Good Morning, Vietnam (both 1987); and his good 'ole boy villainy in the Rutger Hauer action flick Blind Fury (1988). His performances in these films proved that if nothing else, Willingham was a solid backup player who was adept at both comedy and drama. His best remembered role will no doubt be his six year run as the genial barkeep C.D. Parker opposite Chuck Norris in the popular adventure series Walker, Texas Ranger (1993-99). However, film reviewers raved over his tortured performance as a foul-mouthed, bigoted boat salesman who suffers a traffic downfall in the little seen, but searing indie drama The Corndog Man (1998); the role earned Willingham a nomination for Best Actor at the Independent Spirit Awards and it showed that this ably supporting performer had enough charisma and talent to hold his own in a lead role. In 2000, Willingham tried his hand at politics when he unsuccessfully tried to unseat Democrat Max Dandlin in a congressional campaign in east Texas. After the experience, Willingham returned to acting filming Blind Horizon with Val Kilmer in 2003. The movie is to be released later this year. Willingham is survived by his wife, Patti Ross Willingham; a son, John Ross McGlohen; two daughters, Stari Willingham and Meghan McGlohen; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States March 5, 1992 (Shown at benefit screening in Kansas City, Missouri March 5, 1992 for the Veterans of Foreign Wars.)

Released in United States February 26, 1992

Released in United States March 2, 1992

Released in United States March 4, 1992

Released in United States March 5, 1992

Released in United States on Video November 18, 1992

Released in United States Spring March 13, 1992

Shown at benefit screening in Kansas City, Missouri March 5, 1992 for the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Shown at benefit screening in Los Angeles March 4, 1992 for Citizen Action.

Shown at benefit screening in New York City March 2, 1992 for the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

Shown at benefit screening in Washington DC (world premiere) February 26, 1992 for the National Coalition of Homeless Veterans' Service Providers.

Began shooting October 8, 1990.

Completed shooting January 8, 1991.

Released in United States February 26, 1992 (Shown at benefit screening in Washington DC (world premiere) February 26, 1992 for the National Coalition of Homeless Veterans' Service Providers.)

Released in United States March 2, 1992 (Shown at benefit screening in New York City March 2, 1992 for the Society of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.)

Released in United States March 4, 1992 (Shown at benefit screening in Los Angeles March 4, 1992 for Citizen Action.)

Released in United States Spring March 13, 1992

Released in United States on Video November 18, 1992