Alien 3


2h 15m 1992

Brief Synopsis

A penal colony and its inhabitants, a religious brotherhood of ex-convicts, is infiltrated by an alien when a ship carrying Ripley crash lands there.

Film Details

Also Known As
Alien3
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Marina Del Ray, California, USA; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

A penal colony and its inhabitants, a religious brotherhood of ex-convicts, is infiltrated by an alien when a ship carrying Ripley crash lands there.

Crew

Victor Abbene

Gaffer

Peter Abrahamson

Other

Gino Acevedo

Other

Andrew Ackland-snow

Other

William R Aldridge

Special Effects Coordinator

Dave Allen

Medic

John Allenby

Property Master

Maura Alvarez

Rotoscope Animator

Ted Ambrose

Other

David Leroy Anderson

Other

Jonathan Angell

Special Effects

Martin Asbury

Storyboard Artist

Simon Atherton

Other

Petra Bach

Adr Editor

William D Barber

Camera Operator

Anthony Barlow

Other

Len Barnsdale

Driver

John Beach

Titles

Clive Beard

Special Effects

Scott Beattie

Camera Operator

Paul Beeson

Director Of Photography

Bernard Bellew

Assistant Director

Steve Berg

Conceptual Illustrator

Michael Bienstock

Camera Assistant

Neil Binney

Camera Operator

Brian Bishop

Scenic Artist

Xochi Blymyer

Assistant Director

Brent Boates

Storyboard Artist

Teresa Book

Assistant Editor

Michael Boone

Other

Roger Borelli

Other

Christopher Bowler

Visual Effects

Marc Boyle

Stunt Coordinator

Tim Boyle

Music

David Brill

Sound

Brad Brock

Adr Mixer

Chris Brock

Assistant Director

Denis Brock

Gaffer

Christopher S Brooks

Music

Paul Broom

Accounting Assistant

John Brown

Special Effects

Christopher Burian-mohr

Art Director

Danny Burns

Driver

Laurence Burns

Carpenter

Andre Bustanoby

Other

Irena Butcher

Accounting Assistant

Wally Byatt

Camera Operator

Susan Cabral

Makeup Artist

Norman Cabrera

Other

Antonio Caccavale

Other

Paul Calabria

Animal Trainer

Julian Caldow

Other

Doug Calli

Visual Effects

James D Camomile

Special Effects

Colin Campbell

Animator

Dwight Campbell

Lighting Technician

Greg Cannom

Special Makeup Effects

Robert J Carlyle

Construction Coordinator

Patricia Carr

Production Supervisor

Chris Carreras

Assistant Director

Gordon Carroll

Producer

William Carruth

Adr Editor

Gilly Case

Location Manager

John C Casey

Wardrobe

Catherine Chase

Assistant Editor

Jamie Christopher

Assistant Director

Graham Churchyard

Assistant Costume Designer

Kevin Clark

Other

Suzanne Clegg

Script Supervisor

Mark Cockren

Production Assistant

Jack Collins

Gaffer

Adam Cooper

Assistant Camera Operator

Chris Corbould

Special Effects

Mitchell Coughlin

Other

Mark Coulier

Other

Terence Cox

Special Effects

Simon Crane

Stunt Player

Philip Crescenzo

Technical Supervisor

Tony Cridlin

Dolly Grip

Jordan Cronenweth

Thanks

Allan B Croucher

Other

Mike Culling

Animal Trainer

Mick Curran

Transportation

Danny Dark

Special Effects

Chris David

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Rick Davis

Key Grip

Tony Dawe

Sound Mixer

Michael Dawson

Special Effects

Sandy De Crescent

Music

Kevin De La Noy

Location Manager

Val Demeter

Assistant Production Coordinator

Roberto Depalma

Visual Effects

John Desjardin

Production

Linda Devetta

Makeup Artist

Karen Dew

Animal Trainer

Al Di Sarro

Special Effects Coordinator

Teri E. Dorman

Sound Editor

Micky Driscoll

Production

Ken Dudderar

Other

Nick Dudman

Makeup Artist

Ken Dufva

Foley Artist

Michael Dunleavy

Special Effects

Paul Dunn

Other

Marilyn Eardley

Assistant

Janet Earl

Other

John Michael Eaves

Visual Effects

Richard Edlund

Visual Effects

Richard Edlund

Visual Effects Supervisor

Belinda Edwards

Set Decorator

Robert Elhai

Original Music

Juno J. Ellis

Adr Editor

Dave Elsey

Other

Richard Evans

Song

Yuri Everson

Other

David Fein

Foley Artist

Larry Ferguson

Screenplay

Peter Fern

Special Effects

Jose Fernandez

Other

John Ferrari

Visual Effects

Rick Fichter

Mechanical Special Effects

Rick Fichter

Visual Effects Supervisor

Jammie Friday

Rotoscope Animator

Mike Frift

Camera Operator

Marcia Gay

Assistant Director

Gary S. Gerlich

Sound Editor

Gregory M Gerlich

Sound Editor

George Gibbons

Production

George Gibbs

Special Effects Supervisor

Scott Giegler

Production

H.r. Giger

Visual Effects Designer

David Giler

Producer

David Giler

Screenplay

Nick Gillard

Stunt Player

Alec Gillis

Mechanical Special Effects

Kenneth Gittens

Special Effects

Samantha Glen

Accounting Assistant

Vince Goddard

Gaffer

Matthias Gohl

Music Producer

Elliot Goldenthal

Music

Elliot Goldenthal

Original Music

Marilyn Goldsworthy

Accounting Assistant

Patrick Gordon

Special Effects

Robert R Graham

Special Effects

Peter Graovac

Driver

Douglas Greenfield

Consultant

Nicky Gregory

Other

Betty Abbott Griffin

Script Supervisor

Tim Grover

Effects Assistant

Rhonda Gunner

Video

Darrell Guyon

Special Effects

Carolyn Hall

Production Accountant

Chris Halls

Other

Marc A Hammer

Production Assistant

David Hardberger

Camera Operator

Alan Harding

Camera

Steven Harding

Assistant Director

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Norman Hart

Set Decorator

James Haygood

Thanks

Nick Heckstall-smith

Assistant Director

William Hedge

Puppeteer

Paul Hedges

Propman

Ron S Herbes

Assistant Sound Editor

Lil Heyman

Assistant

Ron Higgins

Propman

Walter Hill

Producer

Walter Hill

Screenplay

Joe Hobbs

Wardrobe

Yvonne Hobbs

Wardrobe

John Hogan

Propman

Fred Hole

Art Director

Richard Hollander

Video

John Hood

Transportation Captain

Billy Hopkins

Casting

David L Horton

Foley Editor

Chris Hunt

Other

Jeremy Hunt

Other

David Hunter

Special Effects

Gary Hutchings

Dolly Grip

Joel Iwataki

Music

William Jacobs

Sound Editor

Jerry Michael Jacobson

Foley Editor

Colin Jamison

Hairdresser

Phil Janssens

Other

Paul Jennings

Stunt Player

Paul Jensen

Other

Joanna Jimenez

Assistant Editor

Priscilla John

Location Casting

Robert Johnston

Visual Effects

David Jones

Art Director

Dave Keen

Other

Edward Kennedy

Special Effects

Martin Kenzie

Assistant Camera Operator

Gary B Kibbe

Photography

Steve Kitchen

Gaffer

Bill Klinger

Special Effects Foreman

David Knowles

Special Effects

Paul Knowles

Special Effects

Elliot L. Koretz

Sound Editor

Steve Kosakura

Motion Control

Film Details

Also Known As
Alien3
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1992
Distribution Company
20th Century Fox Distribution
Location
Marina Del Ray, California, USA; Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, Buckinghamshire, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Award Nominations

Best Visual Effects

1992

Articles

The Alien Saga


"Quite a shock, really. I'm mean we were looking at this, sort of, gray penis...can I say that?" Actress Veronica Cartwright says it anyway in reference to a seminal moment in post-Vietnam horror/science-fiction cinema, the chest-bursting scene from Alien (1979). Co-star Yaphet Kotto suffered from "the creeps" for two weeks after shooting the scene, while Tom Skerritt reacted in an equally visceral way to the cow intestines that were used to make the unexpected even more horrifying and gory. These bon mots and other behind-the-scenes facts can be found in the documentary, The Alien Saga, now on DVD from Image Entertainment. Produced by Prometheus Entertainment, The Alien Saga tells the complete history of the influential, lucrative, and highly effective horror series, starting with Alien, followed by the sequels Aliens (1986), Alien3 (1992), and Alien Resurrection (1997).

Alien burst onto the pop cultural scene when alien entities were looked on with favor, wonder, and goodwill. Think of the lanky sightseers in Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), or the eccentric oddities in the Star Wars (1977) cantina, the intergalactic place where everybody knows your species. It was Alien that restored the palpable horror in extraterrestrial encounters that began in The Thing from Another World (1951) and continued throughout the 1950s and into the 60s. But the difference between the experience of Alien and, say, Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), is the national trauma of seeing the blood and guts of Vietnam close encounters on the six o'clock news.

The documentary begins with the birth of the idea, a brainchild of filmmaker Dan O'Bannon, who was sparked onto the idea of a parasitic alien creature by H.R. Giger's conceptual artwork created for an aborted pass at Dune. The documentary gives equal weight to each step of the project's gestation, from several script drafts penned by O'Bannon and Ronald Shusett, to nibbles of interest from Roger Corman, and finally, to 20th Century-Fox's conclusive participation, headed at the time by Alan Ladd, Jr., a dead-ringer for his father. Initially interested in the unprecedented chestbursting scene, Fox and its production partner Brandywine Films commissioned a final script by Brandywine's Walter Hill and David Giler. The Brandywine team made several major adjustments from O'Bannon and Shusett's script, including changing Ripley from a male into a female character.

The Alien Saga touches briefly on the first film's influence on the horror/science fiction genres, but develops fully the production history of the Alien's spawn, namely its three sequels. Each sequel, from the blockbuster Aliens to the critically misunderstood Alien3 and the pretentious, over-the-top Alien Resurrection, is given a complete historical analysis, from casting to shooting to critical and popular reception. Cast members like Sigourney Weaver, Veronica Cartwright, Tom Skerritt, Carrie Henn and Ian Holm discuss their experiences, while Michael Biehn, Ripley's love interest and hard-nosed grunt in Aliens, discusses his displeasure at his character being unceremoniously killed off for Alien3. Ridley Scott and James Cameron, directors of the first two films, appear in archival interviews, but there's not a peep from directors David Fincher and Jean-Pierre Jeunet, helmers of the last two.

Aside from candid and insightful interviews, The Alien Saga offers theatrical trailers, featurettes and other unseen material, including H.R. Giger's bio-mechanical conceptual artwork, on-the-set footage of the productions in process, and even rare screen tests of Sigourney Weaver, directed by Ridley Scott on elaborate sets built in London. The Alien Saga DVD is a great primer for Fox's upcoming Alien Quadrilogy, the comprehensive set of all four films. On the other hand, the DVD could stand as a reason not to invest in the sure-to-be hefty boxed set. Either way, The Alien Saga is worth a look, not just for the fascinating history behind a popular franchise, but a reminder to just how unique and daring the Alien series was - and still is.

For more information about The Alien Saga, visit Image Entertainment. To order The Alien Saga, go to TCM Shopping.

by Scott McGee
The Alien Saga

The Alien Saga

"Quite a shock, really. I'm mean we were looking at this, sort of, gray penis...can I say that?" Actress Veronica Cartwright says it anyway in reference to a seminal moment in post-Vietnam horror/science-fiction cinema, the chest-bursting scene from Alien (1979). Co-star Yaphet Kotto suffered from "the creeps" for two weeks after shooting the scene, while Tom Skerritt reacted in an equally visceral way to the cow intestines that were used to make the unexpected even more horrifying and gory. These bon mots and other behind-the-scenes facts can be found in the documentary, The Alien Saga, now on DVD from Image Entertainment. Produced by Prometheus Entertainment, The Alien Saga tells the complete history of the influential, lucrative, and highly effective horror series, starting with Alien, followed by the sequels Aliens (1986), Alien3 (1992), and Alien Resurrection (1997). Alien burst onto the pop cultural scene when alien entities were looked on with favor, wonder, and goodwill. Think of the lanky sightseers in Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), or the eccentric oddities in the Star Wars (1977) cantina, the intergalactic place where everybody knows your species. It was Alien that restored the palpable horror in extraterrestrial encounters that began in The Thing from Another World (1951) and continued throughout the 1950s and into the 60s. But the difference between the experience of Alien and, say, Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), is the national trauma of seeing the blood and guts of Vietnam close encounters on the six o'clock news. The documentary begins with the birth of the idea, a brainchild of filmmaker Dan O'Bannon, who was sparked onto the idea of a parasitic alien creature by H.R. Giger's conceptual artwork created for an aborted pass at Dune. The documentary gives equal weight to each step of the project's gestation, from several script drafts penned by O'Bannon and Ronald Shusett, to nibbles of interest from Roger Corman, and finally, to 20th Century-Fox's conclusive participation, headed at the time by Alan Ladd, Jr., a dead-ringer for his father. Initially interested in the unprecedented chestbursting scene, Fox and its production partner Brandywine Films commissioned a final script by Brandywine's Walter Hill and David Giler. The Brandywine team made several major adjustments from O'Bannon and Shusett's script, including changing Ripley from a male into a female character. The Alien Saga touches briefly on the first film's influence on the horror/science fiction genres, but develops fully the production history of the Alien's spawn, namely its three sequels. Each sequel, from the blockbuster Aliens to the critically misunderstood Alien3 and the pretentious, over-the-top Alien Resurrection, is given a complete historical analysis, from casting to shooting to critical and popular reception. Cast members like Sigourney Weaver, Veronica Cartwright, Tom Skerritt, Carrie Henn and Ian Holm discuss their experiences, while Michael Biehn, Ripley's love interest and hard-nosed grunt in Aliens, discusses his displeasure at his character being unceremoniously killed off for Alien3. Ridley Scott and James Cameron, directors of the first two films, appear in archival interviews, but there's not a peep from directors David Fincher and Jean-Pierre Jeunet, helmers of the last two. Aside from candid and insightful interviews, The Alien Saga offers theatrical trailers, featurettes and other unseen material, including H.R. Giger's bio-mechanical conceptual artwork, on-the-set footage of the productions in process, and even rare screen tests of Sigourney Weaver, directed by Ridley Scott on elaborate sets built in London. The Alien Saga DVD is a great primer for Fox's upcoming Alien Quadrilogy, the comprehensive set of all four films. On the other hand, the DVD could stand as a reason not to invest in the sure-to-be hefty boxed set. Either way, The Alien Saga is worth a look, not just for the fascinating history behind a popular franchise, but a reminder to just how unique and daring the Alien series was - and still is. For more information about The Alien Saga, visit Image Entertainment. To order The Alien Saga, go to TCM Shopping. by Scott McGee

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video November 18, 1992

Sequel to "Alien" (USA/1979) directed by Ridley Scott.

Feature directorial debut for music video director David Fincher.

Began shooting January 14, 1991.

Completed shooting May 17, 1991.

Visual effects photography continued following the wrap of principal, with additional shooting reportedly taking place up until early May 1992.

Earlier screenplays were written by cyberpunk novelist William Gibson, followed by screenwriters Eric Red, David N Twohy, John Fasano and Greg Pruss.

Actor Holt McCallany is the son of cabaret singer Julie Wilson.

Some special effects shot on 65mm film using the Arriflex 765 camera.

Expanded released in France August 26, 1992.

Released in United States Summer May 22, 1992

Released in United States on Video November 18, 1992

Released in United States Summer May 22, 1992

Limited release in France August 19, 1992.