Torchy Blane, the Adventurous Blonde


1h 1m 1937
Torchy Blane, the Adventurous Blonde

Brief Synopsis

Reporter Torchy Blane walks out on her own wedding to solve the case of a murdered actor.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Adventurous Blonde
Genre
Comedy
Mystery
Sequel
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Nov 13, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 1m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Synopsis

Newspaper reporter Torchy Blane is handed a telegram, which she reads before realizing it actually was sent to Theresa Gray, the woman sitting next to her on the train. Torchy's telegram, when she gets it, is from policeman Steve McBride, announcing that he will have a minister waiting to marry them when her train arrives. Worried that her marriage to Steve will put Torchy ahead in covering the police beat, several reporters decide to play a practical joke on her and postpone her wedding at the same time. The reporters hire an actor to play dead and phone Steve with the news. They hope that Torchy will report the death and that a second paper owned by publisher Mortimer Gray will embarrass her by printing the truth. Then, Harvey Hammond, the actor, is actually murdered, and Torchy beats the other reporters to the story as usual. The suspects in his death are Grace Brown, an actress in Hammond's company; her boyfriend Hugo Brand; Mrs. Jenny Hammond, who was jealous of Hammond's love for Grace; and Theresa Gray, Hammond's discarded lover. Torchy frames Theresa for the murder in order to force a confession from publisher Gray, her husband. Gray, who knew about the proposed joke, was jealous of his wife's relationship with Hammond and seized the opportunity to kill him. He now confesses before taking poison. Cleared of any suspicion, Hugo and Grace are married by Torchy's waiting magistrate, and Torchy and Steve postpone their wedding once again.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Adventurous Blonde
Genre
Comedy
Mystery
Sequel
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Nov 13, 1937
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 1m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
8 reels

Articles

The Adventurous Blonde


The Adventurous Blonde (1937) was the third of seven Torchy Blane films co-starring Glenda Farrell and Barton MacLane. Described by a reviewer as "even funnier and more exciting than its two predecessors in the series, Smart Blonde (1937) and Fly Away, Baby (1937)," The Adventurous Blonde is a tale of revenge that backfires. With Torchy (Farrell) now engaged to marry Lt. Steve MacBride (MacLane), a group of male reporters, miffed that Torchy always gets a scoop on a story ahead of them, create a fake story about a murder, hire an actor (Leyland Hodgson) to play the corpse and trick her into investigating. When the fake murder turns out to be real, Torchy turns the tables on the reporters by scooping them yet again. In the cast were Anne Nagel, Virginia Brissac, William Hopper, Natalie Moorhead and Carole Landis in an uncredited role of a drugstore clerk. Tom Kennedy was back reprising his role of MacBride's assistant, Gahagan.

As with all of the Torchy Blane films, The Adventurous Blonde was a quick shoot, going into production with director Frank McDonald at the helm and a script by Robertson White and David Diamond on June 25, 1937. It wrapped a little over a month later, on August 1st. The film previewed at the Warner Theater in Huntington Park, California in November 1937, with a reporter from The Herald writing that the audience hadn't come to see the film, but a bathing beauty contest that was being staged at the theater. "We don't know if the audience had seen any of the previous numbers in the Torchy series, but it gave evidence by its attention to the film and applause upon its finale that The Adventurous Blonde amused it."

Series director Frank McDonald later recalled that it was he who insisted that Glenda Farrell be given the role of Torchy Blane. "Nobody could spout lines at a faster clip than Glenda. In fact, she still holds the world's record." Farrell is reported to have reeled off a four hundred word speech in only forty seconds in Torchy Gets Her Man (1938). McDonald was careful to surround Farrell with other talent like Barton MacLane, who "was always well up in his lines and he could speed through an otherwise boring continuity scene like an express train." Lt. Steve "Stevie-Weevie" McBride was a rare "good guy" role for MacLane, who usually played the heavy in a career that included over 150 films. So identified was MacLane with these kinds of roles that for a time, kids used "Don't give me that Barton MacLane" to mean that someone in authority was getting tough with them.

Although the Torchy Blane films were a "B" series, Glenda Farrell appreciated the role because, as she once said, it gave her "a chance to break a Hollywood stereotype. Until Torchy arrived on the scene, women reporters were portrayed as either sour old maids, masculine-looking feminists or twittery young girls." Farrell was proud to have created a character that was "bright, attractive, intelligent, daring and single-minded, able to hold her own. Sure, she loved McBride, but she had her own career and wasn't about to settle for keeping house and raising kids while he brought home the bacon. By making Torchy true to life, I tried to create a character practically unique in movies."

By Lorraine LoBianco

SOURCES:
Bubbeo, Daniel The Women of Warner Brothers: The Lives and Careers of 15 Leading Ladies
Good, Howard Girl Reporter: Gender, Journalism and the Movies
"Movie Bad Guy, Barton MacLane, Dead at 66" The Evening Independent 2 Jan 69
Reid, John Howard Your Colossal Main Feature Plus Full Supporting Program
"Torchy Blane - Manos Feature" Greenburg Daily Tribune 17 Nov 37 The Adventurous Blonde (1937)
The Adventurous Blonde

The Adventurous Blonde

The Adventurous Blonde (1937) was the third of seven Torchy Blane films co-starring Glenda Farrell and Barton MacLane. Described by a reviewer as "even funnier and more exciting than its two predecessors in the series, Smart Blonde (1937) and Fly Away, Baby (1937)," The Adventurous Blonde is a tale of revenge that backfires. With Torchy (Farrell) now engaged to marry Lt. Steve MacBride (MacLane), a group of male reporters, miffed that Torchy always gets a scoop on a story ahead of them, create a fake story about a murder, hire an actor (Leyland Hodgson) to play the corpse and trick her into investigating. When the fake murder turns out to be real, Torchy turns the tables on the reporters by scooping them yet again. In the cast were Anne Nagel, Virginia Brissac, William Hopper, Natalie Moorhead and Carole Landis in an uncredited role of a drugstore clerk. Tom Kennedy was back reprising his role of MacBride's assistant, Gahagan. As with all of the Torchy Blane films, The Adventurous Blonde was a quick shoot, going into production with director Frank McDonald at the helm and a script by Robertson White and David Diamond on June 25, 1937. It wrapped a little over a month later, on August 1st. The film previewed at the Warner Theater in Huntington Park, California in November 1937, with a reporter from The Herald writing that the audience hadn't come to see the film, but a bathing beauty contest that was being staged at the theater. "We don't know if the audience had seen any of the previous numbers in the Torchy series, but it gave evidence by its attention to the film and applause upon its finale that The Adventurous Blonde amused it." Series director Frank McDonald later recalled that it was he who insisted that Glenda Farrell be given the role of Torchy Blane. "Nobody could spout lines at a faster clip than Glenda. In fact, she still holds the world's record." Farrell is reported to have reeled off a four hundred word speech in only forty seconds in Torchy Gets Her Man (1938). McDonald was careful to surround Farrell with other talent like Barton MacLane, who "was always well up in his lines and he could speed through an otherwise boring continuity scene like an express train." Lt. Steve "Stevie-Weevie" McBride was a rare "good guy" role for MacLane, who usually played the heavy in a career that included over 150 films. So identified was MacLane with these kinds of roles that for a time, kids used "Don't give me that Barton MacLane" to mean that someone in authority was getting tough with them. Although the Torchy Blane films were a "B" series, Glenda Farrell appreciated the role because, as she once said, it gave her "a chance to break a Hollywood stereotype. Until Torchy arrived on the scene, women reporters were portrayed as either sour old maids, masculine-looking feminists or twittery young girls." Farrell was proud to have created a character that was "bright, attractive, intelligent, daring and single-minded, able to hold her own. Sure, she loved McBride, but she had her own career and wasn't about to settle for keeping house and raising kids while he brought home the bacon. By making Torchy true to life, I tried to create a character practically unique in movies." By Lorraine LoBianco SOURCES: Bubbeo, Daniel The Women of Warner Brothers: The Lives and Careers of 15 Leading Ladies Good, Howard Girl Reporter: Gender, Journalism and the Movies "Movie Bad Guy, Barton MacLane, Dead at 66" The Evening Independent 2 Jan 69 Reid, John Howard Your Colossal Main Feature Plus Full Supporting Program "Torchy Blane - Manos Feature" Greenburg Daily Tribune 17 Nov 37 The Adventurous Blonde (1937)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

This film was also reviewed as The Adventurous Blonde, although the title on the viewed film was Torchy Blane, the Adventurous Blonde. The plot of this film bears a strong resemblance to the 1937 First National film Back in Circulation. For additional information on the series, consult the Series Index and see entry above for Smart Blonde.