Where the Boys Are


1h 39m 1960
Where the Boys Are

Brief Synopsis

College coeds go looking for love during spring break in Fort Lauderdale.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Unholy Spring
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Musical
Release Date
Dec 1960
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: week of 23 Dec 1960
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Where the Boys Are by Glendon Swarthout (New York, 1960).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m
Sound
4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1
Film Length
8,921ft

Synopsis

One blustery winter day at a Midwestern university, as undergraduate Merritt Andrews and her colleague Melanie attend a lecture on the dangers of random dating, Merritt asks the teacher to seriously discuss whether a girl should have sex before marriage. Appalled by Merritt's candor, the teacher sends her to Dean Caldwell, who warns Merritt that although her IQ is high, her faltering grades and misconduct in class might be grounds for expulsion. Although she needs to study, Merritt decides to join Melanie and friends Tuggle Carpenter and Angie on their spring break in sunny Fort Lauderdale, Florida, where thousands of college boys and girls go to vacation. As they drive south, the girls pick up hitchhiker TV Thompson, an outlandish dresser to whom tall Tuggle takes an immediate liking, because her only requirement for a date is that he be taller than her. When the girls arrive at the Fairview apartments to find a group of Ivy League boys, or "Yalies," rooming there as well, Melanie quickly entices neighbor Dill into a date. The next day on the beach, Dill spends time alone with Melanie, while TV and Tuggle listen to radio police reports about all the college kids's ridiculous pranks, then go for a drink using a fake ID. Later that evening, after TV laments that he has a hard time interesting women, the sympathetic Tuggle discloses that she likes him but refuses his advances when he suggests they have sex. Meanwhile, Melanie returns home from her date, having asked Dill to keep their lovemaking a secret. The next morning, Melanie grows excited about her prospects with Dill and reminds the girls that a college couple met and got married during their spring break. Merritt corrects her, explaining that though they met over spring break, the couple married only in October just before the girl was due to give birth to their child. Later on the beach, the girls discuss their futures. Tuggle wants to quit school and become a "walking talking baby factory" with TV, while Angie just wants a date. Merritt shows no interest in men until suave Brown University senior Ryder Smith invites her out for a cocktail. On their date, Merritt becomes defensive about her Midwestern background, but Ryder suggests that "sophistication" is how you think about things, not where you come from. Intrigued by his intelligence, Merritt joins the wealthy Ryder on his grandfather's yacht where she explains her classifications for boys: Sweepers try to sweep you off your feet. Strokers use soft caresses to seduce you. Subtles quote erotic literature to entice you. Ryder assumes Merritt speaks from experience, but Merritt fails to tell him that her vast experience dating has been without sex. The next day, an experimental jazz band performs "dialectic jazz" at a bar and offers free beer to anyone who wants to listen. After the band leader, Basil Demotomes, is rejected by both Tuggle and Merritt, he turns to Angie, who is overjoyed to finally have a date. After spending another day together, Ryder tries to convince Merritt that sex is only a matter of everyday "personal relations," but Merritt refuses his advances. That night, a drunken Melanie announces to the girls that she is in love with a new man, Franklin, who is Dill's roommate. The next day, when Melanie recalls that Merritt had supported sex before marriage during the school lecture, Merritt tells her it was not advice for young, drunk kids. Later, Ryder professes that though he has told many women that he "loves" them, he actually likes Merritt. Later that night while the jazz group plays, Angie succeeds in attracting Basil's attention by singing her own catchy lyrics to his composition. Meanwhile, the love struck Melanie finds out that Franklin does not consider their relationship to be special and suggests an impulsive marriage would be silly. The next evening, with only days left in their vacation, Merritt, Tuggle and Angie discuss their chances of getting a marriage proposal without giving up their chastity while they prepare for a triple date together. Despite Merritt's attempts to include her, Melanie insists on staying home to wait for Franklin's call. Ryder takes the group to the Tropical Isle, where a drunken TV cannot resist stage entertainer Lola, who performs underwater acrobatic tricks in a large tank. When TV jumps in the tank with Lola, Tuggle, knowing TV cannot swim, jumps in after him. Soon Merritt, Angie, Ryder and Basil have fallen in the tank attempting to save one another. After the police dismiss the restaurant's charges against them, the group have a beach party, where TV is once again seduced by Lola's dancing. When jealous Tuggle hears TV use the same line on Lola as he did on her, she interrupts, but TV yells at her to leave them alone. Meanwhile, when Dill arrives to meet Melanie at an arranged motel room and announces he is replacing Franklin, she realizes the boys are using her and tries unsuccessfully to fight him off. Soon after, traumatized by the rape, she calls Tuggle at the motel. Back at the party, Merritt is almost ready to give up her virginity in the heat of passion with Ryder, when Tuggle asks them to help Melanie. As they drive towards the motel from which Melanie has phoned, they see her wandering on the traffic-filled road where she is hit by a car. After Ryder pulls her from traffic, they take Melanie to a hospital, where Merritt chastises Ryder for being like all boys who think girls exist merely to please boys. Alone with Merritt, Melanie laments her mistake and caustically says the boys were not even "Yalies," prompting Merritt to cry in shame. TV arrives at the hospital soon after to reassure Tuggle that he only wants to be by her side. The next day TV, Basil, Angie and Tuggle leave for home, while Merritt remains to care for Melanie until she can return to her parents. Merritt doubts her own resolve about chastity, but Ryder assures her that she is too strong to succumb. Merritt responds that no girl is strong in the face of what she thinks is love. When they both cautiously offer that they might be in love, Ryder asks her to come to his Brown graduation and continue their relationship.

Film Details

Also Known As
The Unholy Spring
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Drama
Musical
Release Date
Dec 1960
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: week of 23 Dec 1960
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Where the Boys Are by Glendon Swarthout (New York, 1960).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 39m
Sound
4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1
Film Length
8,921ft

Articles

Where the Boys Are (1960)


Where the Boys Are, the 1960 teen culture classic about Fort Lauderdale-bound college Spring vacationers, has spawned many imitators and even a 1984 remake, but has never been equaled in its exuberant display of college students having fun in the Florida sun. Nothing just happens by accident, and the reasons for the 40-year plus longevity of this favorite can be at least partially attributed to the talent in front of and behind the cameras.

First off, producer Joe Pasternak (1901-1991) was no slouch when it came to concocting teenage fare - having made his mark early on at Universal with the Deanna Durbin smash hits Three Smart Girls (1936) and One Hundred Men and a Girl, released the following year.

From Universal and Deanna Durbin, Pasternak moved on to MGM and June Allyson and Jane Powell, where he became a sort of junior Arthur Freed, helming the more modestly-budgeted musicals, which may not have carried the critical weight of a Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) or Ziegfeld Follies (1946), but made up for it with style, gusto and an uncanny ability to zero in on the youth market. Pictures such as Two Girls and a Sailor (1944), A Date With Judy (1948), Nancy Goes to Rio (1950) and Small Town Girl (1953) struck box office gold and MGM showed its gratitude by giving the Hungarian-born dynamo (who began his Hollywood tenure as a waiter in the Paramount commissary) an occasional prestige project like Anchors Aweigh (1945), Summer Stock (1950) and The Great Caruso (1951), all of which he handled with panache.

The unenviable task of scripting Where the Boys Are fell to MGM veteran George Wells whose lighthearted touch graced many successful Metro items in the 1940s and 50s, including Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949), Three Little Words (1950), and Designing Woman (1957). However, fans of the original Glendon Swarthout novel regretted that his uncompromising satire on American pubescence rites-of-passage reached the screen in a considerably watered-down version. Still, Wells did manage to include a rather graphic interlude of date rape involving one of the major characters, certainly unusual for a sixties teen romance. Perhaps it wasn't so surprising considering Wells' ability to throw that left of center curve in such previous films as the cynical Madison Avenue drama about advertising - The Hucksters (1947) and the black comedy, The Gazebo (1959).

The versatile cast of Where the Boys Are now reads like a 'who's who' of sixties icons. To start with there's male lead George Hamilton who seems to have modeled his off and on-screen personae of the always suntanned millionaire playboy on this movie while his beautiful co-star Dolores Hart can lay claim to starring opposite Elvis Presley in two Paramount back-to-back successes, Loving You (1957) and King Creole (1958). Was that the reason she left acting for the Benedictine order, where she is now known as Mother Dolores?

Then there's Yvette Mimieux, the picture's loose cannon, who comes close to stealing the picture with her disturbing, self-destructive behavior with a group of drunken men. And let's not forget Connie Francis, whose rendition of the theme song stayed on the top ten charts for weeks and remains a standard in her repertoire today.

Unquestionably, the two major finds of the film are the unofficial romantic team of Jim Hutton and Paula Prentiss. Hutton, discovered by director Douglas Sirk while still in the service, made his debut in the director's 1958 war drama, A Time to Love and a Time to Die. A great light comedian, Hutton's height (well over six feet) matched him perfectly with Prentiss, a marvelous underrated comedienne who was also tall and thin and always brought a deft combination of brainy yet kooky sexiness to her many roles. It was her performance in movies like this one which caught director Howard Hawks' eye - and assured her the female lead in his overlooked 1964 gem, Man's Favorite Sport?. Hutton and Prentiss' chemistry worked so well that MGM, in quick succession, cast them in four other comedies, Bachelor in Paradise (1961), The Honeymoon Machine (1961), The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962) and Looking For Love (1964). Other faces to look for: a pre-Riddler Frank Gorshin as a near-sighted jazz musician, Chill Wills as the local sheriff and Sean Flynn, Errol's son, as one of the throngs of swinging collegians.

Premiering at New York's prestigious Radio City Music Hall, Where the Boys Are performed remarkably well - doing even better once it opened wide across the country. Why it endures is probably something that can be debated on both sides of the cultural coin, but perhaps Time Magazine said it best in their review when they pegged it as "...one of those pictures every intelligent moviegoer will loathe himself for liking - a corny, phony, raucous outburst of fraternity humor, sorority sex talk and house-mother homilies that nevertheless warms two hours of winter with a travel-poster panorama of fresh young faces, firm young bodies and good old Florida sunshine..."

Producer: Joe Pasternak
Director: Henry Levin
Screenplay: Glendon Swarthout, George Wells
Art Direction: E. Preston Ames, George W. Davis
Cinematography: Robert J. Bronner
Costume Design: Kitty Mager
Film Editing: Fredric Steinkamp
Original Music: Pete Rugolo, George E. Stoll
Principal Cast: Dolores Hart (Merritt Andrews), George Hamilton (Ryder Smith), Yvette Mimieux (Melanie Coleman), Jim Hutton (TV Thompson), Paula Prentiss (Tuggle Carpenter), Barbara Nichols (Lola), Connie Francis (Angie), Frank Gorshin (Basil), Chill Wills (Police Captain).
C-100m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video.

by Mel Neuhaus

Where The Boys Are (1960)

Where the Boys Are (1960)

Where the Boys Are, the 1960 teen culture classic about Fort Lauderdale-bound college Spring vacationers, has spawned many imitators and even a 1984 remake, but has never been equaled in its exuberant display of college students having fun in the Florida sun. Nothing just happens by accident, and the reasons for the 40-year plus longevity of this favorite can be at least partially attributed to the talent in front of and behind the cameras. First off, producer Joe Pasternak (1901-1991) was no slouch when it came to concocting teenage fare - having made his mark early on at Universal with the Deanna Durbin smash hits Three Smart Girls (1936) and One Hundred Men and a Girl, released the following year. From Universal and Deanna Durbin, Pasternak moved on to MGM and June Allyson and Jane Powell, where he became a sort of junior Arthur Freed, helming the more modestly-budgeted musicals, which may not have carried the critical weight of a Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) or Ziegfeld Follies (1946), but made up for it with style, gusto and an uncanny ability to zero in on the youth market. Pictures such as Two Girls and a Sailor (1944), A Date With Judy (1948), Nancy Goes to Rio (1950) and Small Town Girl (1953) struck box office gold and MGM showed its gratitude by giving the Hungarian-born dynamo (who began his Hollywood tenure as a waiter in the Paramount commissary) an occasional prestige project like Anchors Aweigh (1945), Summer Stock (1950) and The Great Caruso (1951), all of which he handled with panache. The unenviable task of scripting Where the Boys Are fell to MGM veteran George Wells whose lighthearted touch graced many successful Metro items in the 1940s and 50s, including Take Me Out to the Ball Game (1949), Three Little Words (1950), and Designing Woman (1957). However, fans of the original Glendon Swarthout novel regretted that his uncompromising satire on American pubescence rites-of-passage reached the screen in a considerably watered-down version. Still, Wells did manage to include a rather graphic interlude of date rape involving one of the major characters, certainly unusual for a sixties teen romance. Perhaps it wasn't so surprising considering Wells' ability to throw that left of center curve in such previous films as the cynical Madison Avenue drama about advertising - The Hucksters (1947) and the black comedy, The Gazebo (1959). The versatile cast of Where the Boys Are now reads like a 'who's who' of sixties icons. To start with there's male lead George Hamilton who seems to have modeled his off and on-screen personae of the always suntanned millionaire playboy on this movie while his beautiful co-star Dolores Hart can lay claim to starring opposite Elvis Presley in two Paramount back-to-back successes, Loving You (1957) and King Creole (1958). Was that the reason she left acting for the Benedictine order, where she is now known as Mother Dolores? Then there's Yvette Mimieux, the picture's loose cannon, who comes close to stealing the picture with her disturbing, self-destructive behavior with a group of drunken men. And let's not forget Connie Francis, whose rendition of the theme song stayed on the top ten charts for weeks and remains a standard in her repertoire today. Unquestionably, the two major finds of the film are the unofficial romantic team of Jim Hutton and Paula Prentiss. Hutton, discovered by director Douglas Sirk while still in the service, made his debut in the director's 1958 war drama, A Time to Love and a Time to Die. A great light comedian, Hutton's height (well over six feet) matched him perfectly with Prentiss, a marvelous underrated comedienne who was also tall and thin and always brought a deft combination of brainy yet kooky sexiness to her many roles. It was her performance in movies like this one which caught director Howard Hawks' eye - and assured her the female lead in his overlooked 1964 gem, Man's Favorite Sport?. Hutton and Prentiss' chemistry worked so well that MGM, in quick succession, cast them in four other comedies, Bachelor in Paradise (1961), The Honeymoon Machine (1961), The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962) and Looking For Love (1964). Other faces to look for: a pre-Riddler Frank Gorshin as a near-sighted jazz musician, Chill Wills as the local sheriff and Sean Flynn, Errol's son, as one of the throngs of swinging collegians. Premiering at New York's prestigious Radio City Music Hall, Where the Boys Are performed remarkably well - doing even better once it opened wide across the country. Why it endures is probably something that can be debated on both sides of the cultural coin, but perhaps Time Magazine said it best in their review when they pegged it as "...one of those pictures every intelligent moviegoer will loathe himself for liking - a corny, phony, raucous outburst of fraternity humor, sorority sex talk and house-mother homilies that nevertheless warms two hours of winter with a travel-poster panorama of fresh young faces, firm young bodies and good old Florida sunshine..." Producer: Joe Pasternak Director: Henry Levin Screenplay: Glendon Swarthout, George Wells Art Direction: E. Preston Ames, George W. Davis Cinematography: Robert J. Bronner Costume Design: Kitty Mager Film Editing: Fredric Steinkamp Original Music: Pete Rugolo, George E. Stoll Principal Cast: Dolores Hart (Merritt Andrews), George Hamilton (Ryder Smith), Yvette Mimieux (Melanie Coleman), Jim Hutton (TV Thompson), Paula Prentiss (Tuggle Carpenter), Barbara Nichols (Lola), Connie Francis (Angie), Frank Gorshin (Basil), Chill Wills (Police Captain). C-100m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. Descriptive Video. by Mel Neuhaus

Frank Gorshin (1933-2005)


Frank Gorshin, a skilled comedian, impressionist and character actor who will forever be indentified with his role as "The Riddler" on the cult series from the '60s Batman lost his battle with lung cancer on May 17 at the Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California. He was 72.

He was born on April 5, 1933, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania into a family of modest means, his father was a railroad worker and mother a homemaker. His childhood impressions of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney paid off when he won a local talent contest at 17, and that led to his first gig at 17 at a the prize was a one week engagement at Jackie Heller's Carousel night club, Pittsburgh's hottest downtown spot in the day. The taste was there, and after high school Frank enrolled in the Carnegie-Mellon Tech School of Drama did hone his craft.

His career was interrupted briefly when he entered the US Army in 1953. He spent two years in Special Services as an entertainer. Once he got out, Frank tried his luck in Hollywood. He made his film debut in a forgettable William Holden vehicle The Proud and Profane, but his fortunes picked up soon when he and when he hooked up with American Internation Pictures (AIP). With his charasmatic sneer and cocky bravado that belied his slender, 5' 7" frame, Frank made a great punk villian in a series of entertaining "drive-in" fare: Hot Rod Girl (1956), Dragstrip Girl, Invasion of the Saucer Men, and of course the classic Portland Expose (all 1957).

By the '60s, he graduated to supporting roles in bigger Hollywood fare: Where the Boys Are, Bells Are Ringing (both 1960), Ring of Fire, and his biggest tole to date, that of Iggy the bank robber in Disney's hugely popular That Darn Cat (1965). Better still, Frank found some parts on television: Naked City, Combat!, The Untouchables, and this would be the medium where he found his greatest success. Little did he realize that when his skeletal physique donned those green nylon tights and cackled his high pitch laugh that Frank Gorshin would be forever identified as "the Riddler," one of Batman's main nemisis. For two years (1966-68), he was a semi-regular on the show and it brought him deserved national attention.

By the '70s, Frank made his Broadway debut, as the star of Jimmy, a musical based on the life of former New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker. He spent the next two decades alternating between the stage, where he appeared regularly in national touring productions of such popular shows as: Promises, Promises, Prisoner of Second Street, and Guys and Dolls; and nightclub work in Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

He recently found himself in demand for character roles on televison: Murder, She Wrote, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and film: Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys (1995), and the quirky comedy Man of the Century (1999). Yet his biggest triumph was his two year stint (2002-2004) as George Burns in the Broadway smash, Say Goodnight Gracie. It ran for 364 performances and he received critical raves from even the toughest New York theater critics, proving undoubtly that he was a performer for all mediums. He is survived by his wife Christina; a son, Mitchell; grandson Brandon and sister Dottie.

by Michael T. Toole

Frank Gorshin (1933-2005)

Frank Gorshin, a skilled comedian, impressionist and character actor who will forever be indentified with his role as "The Riddler" on the cult series from the '60s Batman lost his battle with lung cancer on May 17 at the Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California. He was 72. He was born on April 5, 1933, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania into a family of modest means, his father was a railroad worker and mother a homemaker. His childhood impressions of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney paid off when he won a local talent contest at 17, and that led to his first gig at 17 at a the prize was a one week engagement at Jackie Heller's Carousel night club, Pittsburgh's hottest downtown spot in the day. The taste was there, and after high school Frank enrolled in the Carnegie-Mellon Tech School of Drama did hone his craft. His career was interrupted briefly when he entered the US Army in 1953. He spent two years in Special Services as an entertainer. Once he got out, Frank tried his luck in Hollywood. He made his film debut in a forgettable William Holden vehicle The Proud and Profane, but his fortunes picked up soon when he and when he hooked up with American Internation Pictures (AIP). With his charasmatic sneer and cocky bravado that belied his slender, 5' 7" frame, Frank made a great punk villian in a series of entertaining "drive-in" fare: Hot Rod Girl (1956), Dragstrip Girl, Invasion of the Saucer Men, and of course the classic Portland Expose (all 1957). By the '60s, he graduated to supporting roles in bigger Hollywood fare: Where the Boys Are, Bells Are Ringing (both 1960), Ring of Fire, and his biggest tole to date, that of Iggy the bank robber in Disney's hugely popular That Darn Cat (1965). Better still, Frank found some parts on television: Naked City, Combat!, The Untouchables, and this would be the medium where he found his greatest success. Little did he realize that when his skeletal physique donned those green nylon tights and cackled his high pitch laugh that Frank Gorshin would be forever identified as "the Riddler," one of Batman's main nemisis. For two years (1966-68), he was a semi-regular on the show and it brought him deserved national attention. By the '70s, Frank made his Broadway debut, as the star of Jimmy, a musical based on the life of former New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker. He spent the next two decades alternating between the stage, where he appeared regularly in national touring productions of such popular shows as: Promises, Promises, Prisoner of Second Street, and Guys and Dolls; and nightclub work in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. He recently found himself in demand for character roles on televison: Murder, She Wrote, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and film: Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys (1995), and the quirky comedy Man of the Century (1999). Yet his biggest triumph was his two year stint (2002-2004) as George Burns in the Broadway smash, Say Goodnight Gracie. It ran for 364 performances and he received critical raves from even the toughest New York theater critics, proving undoubtly that he was a performer for all mediums. He is survived by his wife Christina; a son, Mitchell; grandson Brandon and sister Dottie. by Michael T. Toole

Where the Boys Are


Where the Boys Are, the 1960 teen culture classic about Fort Lauderdale-bound college Spring vacationers, has spawned many imitators and even a 1984 remake, but has never been equaled in its exuberant display of college students having fun in the Florida sun. Nothing just happens by accident, and the reasons for the 40-year plus longevity of this favorite - now on DVD from Warners Video - can be at least partially attributed to the talent in front of and behind the cameras.

First off, producer Joe Pasternak (1901-1991) was no slouch when it came to concocting teenage fare - having made his mark early on at Universal with the Deanna Durbin smash hits Three Smart Girls (1936) and One Hundred Men and a Girl, released the following year.

The versatile cast of Where the Boys Are now reads like a 'who's who' of sixties icons. To start with there's male lead George Hamilton who seems to have modeled his off and on-screen personae of the always suntanned millionaire playboy on this movie while his beautiful co-star Dolores Hart can lay claim to starring opposite Elvis Presley in two Paramount back-to-back successes, Loving You (1957) and King Creole (1958). Was that the reason she left acting for the Benedictine order, where she is now known as Mother Dolores?

Then there's Yvette Mimieux, the picture's loose cannon, who comes close to stealing the picture with her disturbing, self-destructive behavior with a group of drunken men. And let's not forget Connie Francis, whose rendition of the theme song stayed on the top ten charts for weeks and remains a standard in her repertoire today.

Unquestionably, the two major finds of the film are the unofficial romantic team of Jim Hutton and Paula Prentiss. Hutton, discovered by director Douglas Sirk while still in the service, made his debut in the director's 1958 war drama, A Time to Love and a Time to Die. A great light comedian, Hutton's height (well over six feet) matched him perfectly with Prentiss, a marvelous underrated comedienne who was also tall and thin and always brought a deft combination of brainy yet kooky sexiness to her many roles. It was her performance in movies like this one which caught director Howard Hawks' eye - and assured her the female lead in his overlooked 1964 gem, Man's Favorite Sport?. Hutton and Prentiss' chemistry worked so well that MGM, in quick succession, cast them in four other comedies, Bachelor in Paradise (1961), The Honeymoon Machine (1961), The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962) and Looking For Love (1964). Other faces to look for: a pre-Riddler Frank Gorshin as a near-sighted jazz musician, Chill Wills as the local sheriff and Sean Flynn, Errol's son, as one of the throngs of swinging collegians.

Premiering at New York's prestigious Radio City Music Hall, Where the Boys Are performed remarkably well - doing even better once it opened wide across the country. Why it endures is probably something that can be debated on both sides of the cultural coin, but perhaps Time Magazine said it best in their review when they pegged it as "...one of those pictures every intelligent moviegoer will loathe himself for liking - a corny, phony, raucous outburst of fraternity humor, sorority sex talk and house-mother homilies that nevertheless warms two hours of winter with a travel-poster panorama of fresh young faces, firm young bodies and good old Florida sunshine..."

The Warner Video DVD release of Where the Boys Are has been given a sparkling transfer; the colors are vibrant and the audio is crystal clear. You can throw away your old pan-and-scan VHS copy now. Best of all is the commentary track by Paula Prentiss which is a warm and intimate recollection of the film's shoot. Not only does she share fond memories of her co-stars but Prentiss also discusses her own Hollywood career and how she was "discovered." Her delightful sense of humor - always one of her best on-screen attributes - is still intact and among the anecdotes she relates is a visit to see co-star Dolores Hart at her convent in Connecticut (Ms. Hart retired from films in 1963 to become a nun). The other extras include a short featurette, "Where the Boys Are: A Retrospective," newsreel footage of the Fort Lauderdale premiere and the original theatrical trailer.

For more information about Where the Boys Are, visit Warner Video. To order Where the Boys Are, go to TCM Shopping.

by Mel Neuhaus

Where the Boys Are

Where the Boys Are, the 1960 teen culture classic about Fort Lauderdale-bound college Spring vacationers, has spawned many imitators and even a 1984 remake, but has never been equaled in its exuberant display of college students having fun in the Florida sun. Nothing just happens by accident, and the reasons for the 40-year plus longevity of this favorite - now on DVD from Warners Video - can be at least partially attributed to the talent in front of and behind the cameras. First off, producer Joe Pasternak (1901-1991) was no slouch when it came to concocting teenage fare - having made his mark early on at Universal with the Deanna Durbin smash hits Three Smart Girls (1936) and One Hundred Men and a Girl, released the following year. The versatile cast of Where the Boys Are now reads like a 'who's who' of sixties icons. To start with there's male lead George Hamilton who seems to have modeled his off and on-screen personae of the always suntanned millionaire playboy on this movie while his beautiful co-star Dolores Hart can lay claim to starring opposite Elvis Presley in two Paramount back-to-back successes, Loving You (1957) and King Creole (1958). Was that the reason she left acting for the Benedictine order, where she is now known as Mother Dolores? Then there's Yvette Mimieux, the picture's loose cannon, who comes close to stealing the picture with her disturbing, self-destructive behavior with a group of drunken men. And let's not forget Connie Francis, whose rendition of the theme song stayed on the top ten charts for weeks and remains a standard in her repertoire today. Unquestionably, the two major finds of the film are the unofficial romantic team of Jim Hutton and Paula Prentiss. Hutton, discovered by director Douglas Sirk while still in the service, made his debut in the director's 1958 war drama, A Time to Love and a Time to Die. A great light comedian, Hutton's height (well over six feet) matched him perfectly with Prentiss, a marvelous underrated comedienne who was also tall and thin and always brought a deft combination of brainy yet kooky sexiness to her many roles. It was her performance in movies like this one which caught director Howard Hawks' eye - and assured her the female lead in his overlooked 1964 gem, Man's Favorite Sport?. Hutton and Prentiss' chemistry worked so well that MGM, in quick succession, cast them in four other comedies, Bachelor in Paradise (1961), The Honeymoon Machine (1961), The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962) and Looking For Love (1964). Other faces to look for: a pre-Riddler Frank Gorshin as a near-sighted jazz musician, Chill Wills as the local sheriff and Sean Flynn, Errol's son, as one of the throngs of swinging collegians. Premiering at New York's prestigious Radio City Music Hall, Where the Boys Are performed remarkably well - doing even better once it opened wide across the country. Why it endures is probably something that can be debated on both sides of the cultural coin, but perhaps Time Magazine said it best in their review when they pegged it as "...one of those pictures every intelligent moviegoer will loathe himself for liking - a corny, phony, raucous outburst of fraternity humor, sorority sex talk and house-mother homilies that nevertheless warms two hours of winter with a travel-poster panorama of fresh young faces, firm young bodies and good old Florida sunshine..." The Warner Video DVD release of Where the Boys Are has been given a sparkling transfer; the colors are vibrant and the audio is crystal clear. You can throw away your old pan-and-scan VHS copy now. Best of all is the commentary track by Paula Prentiss which is a warm and intimate recollection of the film's shoot. Not only does she share fond memories of her co-stars but Prentiss also discusses her own Hollywood career and how she was "discovered." Her delightful sense of humor - always one of her best on-screen attributes - is still intact and among the anecdotes she relates is a visit to see co-star Dolores Hart at her convent in Connecticut (Ms. Hart retired from films in 1963 to become a nun). The other extras include a short featurette, "Where the Boys Are: A Retrospective," newsreel footage of the Fort Lauderdale premiere and the original theatrical trailer. For more information about Where the Boys Are, visit Warner Video. To order Where the Boys Are, go to TCM Shopping. by Mel Neuhaus

TCM Remembers - Jack Kruschen


Jack Kruschen (1922-2002)

He may have not been a household name, yet his career consisted of over seventy-five films, spanned over six decades, and displayed a strong versatility in playing either dramatic or comic roles with equal effectiveness. He was the definitive, "I can't quite remember the name, but I remember the face" character player who enlivened many films with his robust frame, cherubic face and infectious smile. His name was Jack Kruschen, a superb performer who died on April 2, 2002 at the age of 80, leaving behind a strong body of work that was impressive as any character actor of his generation.

Kruschen was born on March 20, 1922 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The son of a watchmaker who later set up shop in Hollywood, he was performing in an operetta at Hollywood high school when a talent scout for CBS radio discovered him. Kruschen was soon doing voice characterizations on popular network programs such as Dragnet, The Danny Thomas Show and Sam Spade. With his gift for dialects (he was most adept at playing ethnic types like Greeks, Yiddish or Italians - a skill finely honed in his radio days), Kruschen was a natural for the movies and soon made his film debut with a small role in the Betty Hutton comedy Red, Hot and Blue (1949).

Kruschen's early career is peppered with a variety of roles like a comical gangster in both Abbott & Costello Go to Mars (1953) and Money from Home (1953) starring Jerry Lewis & Dean Martin; a hard-nosed police detective in Confidence Girl (1952) and Julie (1956), an underrated Doris Day thriller; or doomed victims to alien prey in Sci-fi cult classics: the 1953 version of War of the Worlds (fans remember him as Salvatore, one of the first earthlings to be killed by the invading Martians) and The Angry Red Planet (1959). The roles offered steady work, but not much critical recognition. All that changed when Billy Wilder cast him in the key role as Jack Lemmon's bemused but caring neighbor, Dr. Dreyfuss in The Apartment (1960). As the man who observes the steady stream of women in and out of Lemmon's apartment and the one who saves Shirley MacLaine from a drug overdose, Kruschen offered a wonderful performance - viewing his neighbor's proceedings with a jaundiced eye, yet never letting his disdain overtake his humor and humanity. He was justly rewarded with an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor.

From this point on, Kruschen was seldom out of work, appearing in over 40 films (including a terrific dramatic turn in the original Cape Fear (1962) as Dave Grafton, a corrupt southern bigot) and nearly 60 guest roles on television for the next two decades. Kruschen would later find fame toward the end of his career when he was cast as Papa Papadapolis in the hit sitcom Webster (1985-1987) and would show pleasant variations of the "kindly old codger" throughout the remainder of his career - like his final role in the romantic comedy 'Til There Was You (1997). His death in April this year may have gone largely unnoticed by the movie-going public, but for those of us who treasure the art of the character player, Kruschen's passing was a loss that is fortunately compensated by his strong body of work that will be enjoyed for fans of the late show for many years to come.

By Michael T. Toole

SIGNE HASSO, 1910-2002

Actress Signe Hasso died June 7th at the age of 91. She was best-known for starring in A Double Life (1947) but played numerous Europeans in films during the 1940s. Hasso was born on August 15, 1910 in Stockholm, Sweden and began acting on stage at the age of 13. Ten years later made her first film appearance as Signe Larsson. She was married in 1936 and adopted the last name of her husband, cinematographer and later director Harry Hasso. After a dozen Swedish films, Hasso moved to Hollywood in 1940 where her first screen appearance was an uncredited role in Journey for Margaret (1942). A brief stint at RKO didn't lead to any more promising film parts so Hasso concentrated on her stage career in New York City. Eventually, her film career became more active, thanks to a quick succession of roles, most notably in Fred Zinnemann's The Seventh Cross (1944), Douglas Sirk's A Scandal in Paris (1946) and Henry Hathaway's The House on 92nd Street (1945). However it was her portrayal of Ronald Colman's wife in the Oscar-favorite A Double Life that solidified her fame. But as Hasso continued to act on the stage and TV, her film work began to taper off. She appeared in high-profile thrillers like Crisis (1950), several made-for-TV movies, a few European productions and even the cult murder mystery, Bert Gordon's Picture Mommy Dead (1966). In 1972, the king of Sweden decorated Hasso for her work. Her final appearance was in a 2001 documentary about Greta Garbo.

HERMAN COHEN, 1927-2002

One of the key producers of B-movies, Herman Cohen, died June 2nd at the age of 76. Like most producers, his name wasn't generally known outside the industry or the realms of film buffs but most people never forget the titles of his films: I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957), Horrors of the Black Museum (1959) and the not-quite-immortal Bela Lugosi Meets a Brooklyn Gorilla (1952). Cohen was a Detroit native, born August 27, 1927. He entered the film business in the smallest possible way, as a 12-year-old janitor, often accepting passes for his family and friends instead of wages. Cohen served in the Marine Corps (several articles incorrectly say the Army) before becoming a publicist at Columbia Pictures. By 1951 he was working as a producer's assistant on low-budget independent films, mostly for Realart Pictures run by another Detroit native Jack Broder. Soon Cohen was producing his own movies, including Westerns and mysteries, until hitting big with the famous I Was a Teenage Werewolf. Starring a then-unknown Michael Landon (under personal contract to Cohen who later tore it up so Landon could appear in Bonanza), the film was made for $100,000 but in just a few months grossed over $2 million. Cohen didn't hestitate to turn out I Was a Teenage Frankenstein and Blood of Dracula by Thanksgiving of that same year and before long had made several films that continued to earn money for years to come. (One TCM writer remembers Horrors of the Black Museum turning up in a small Alabama town in the early 70s, over a decade after its initial release. The film is scheduled for a DVD release with a Cohen commentary from VCI Entertainment.) Cohen also made several films in England including The Headless Ghost (1959) and the cult favorite Konga (1961) where Cohen even paid RKO $25,000 for the rights to use the title King Kong in publicity for his own film. Cohen's later movies included a spaghetti Western and Joan Crawford's final acting role Trog (1970). In the 1980s Cohen ran a company, Cobra Media, that distributed some films and licensed material such as Teenage Werewolf to Landon for use in one of his Highway to Heaven episodes.

By Lang Thompson

TCM Remembers - Jack Kruschen

Jack Kruschen (1922-2002) He may have not been a household name, yet his career consisted of over seventy-five films, spanned over six decades, and displayed a strong versatility in playing either dramatic or comic roles with equal effectiveness. He was the definitive, "I can't quite remember the name, but I remember the face" character player who enlivened many films with his robust frame, cherubic face and infectious smile. His name was Jack Kruschen, a superb performer who died on April 2, 2002 at the age of 80, leaving behind a strong body of work that was impressive as any character actor of his generation. Kruschen was born on March 20, 1922 in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. The son of a watchmaker who later set up shop in Hollywood, he was performing in an operetta at Hollywood high school when a talent scout for CBS radio discovered him. Kruschen was soon doing voice characterizations on popular network programs such as Dragnet, The Danny Thomas Show and Sam Spade. With his gift for dialects (he was most adept at playing ethnic types like Greeks, Yiddish or Italians - a skill finely honed in his radio days), Kruschen was a natural for the movies and soon made his film debut with a small role in the Betty Hutton comedy Red, Hot and Blue (1949). Kruschen's early career is peppered with a variety of roles like a comical gangster in both Abbott & Costello Go to Mars (1953) and Money from Home (1953) starring Jerry Lewis & Dean Martin; a hard-nosed police detective in Confidence Girl (1952) and Julie (1956), an underrated Doris Day thriller; or doomed victims to alien prey in Sci-fi cult classics: the 1953 version of War of the Worlds (fans remember him as Salvatore, one of the first earthlings to be killed by the invading Martians) and The Angry Red Planet (1959). The roles offered steady work, but not much critical recognition. All that changed when Billy Wilder cast him in the key role as Jack Lemmon's bemused but caring neighbor, Dr. Dreyfuss in The Apartment (1960). As the man who observes the steady stream of women in and out of Lemmon's apartment and the one who saves Shirley MacLaine from a drug overdose, Kruschen offered a wonderful performance - viewing his neighbor's proceedings with a jaundiced eye, yet never letting his disdain overtake his humor and humanity. He was justly rewarded with an Oscar nomination as Best Supporting Actor. From this point on, Kruschen was seldom out of work, appearing in over 40 films (including a terrific dramatic turn in the original Cape Fear (1962) as Dave Grafton, a corrupt southern bigot) and nearly 60 guest roles on television for the next two decades. Kruschen would later find fame toward the end of his career when he was cast as Papa Papadapolis in the hit sitcom Webster (1985-1987) and would show pleasant variations of the "kindly old codger" throughout the remainder of his career - like his final role in the romantic comedy 'Til There Was You (1997). His death in April this year may have gone largely unnoticed by the movie-going public, but for those of us who treasure the art of the character player, Kruschen's passing was a loss that is fortunately compensated by his strong body of work that will be enjoyed for fans of the late show for many years to come. By Michael T. Toole SIGNE HASSO, 1910-2002 Actress Signe Hasso died June 7th at the age of 91. She was best-known for starring in A Double Life (1947) but played numerous Europeans in films during the 1940s. Hasso was born on August 15, 1910 in Stockholm, Sweden and began acting on stage at the age of 13. Ten years later made her first film appearance as Signe Larsson. She was married in 1936 and adopted the last name of her husband, cinematographer and later director Harry Hasso. After a dozen Swedish films, Hasso moved to Hollywood in 1940 where her first screen appearance was an uncredited role in Journey for Margaret (1942). A brief stint at RKO didn't lead to any more promising film parts so Hasso concentrated on her stage career in New York City. Eventually, her film career became more active, thanks to a quick succession of roles, most notably in Fred Zinnemann's The Seventh Cross (1944), Douglas Sirk's A Scandal in Paris (1946) and Henry Hathaway's The House on 92nd Street (1945). However it was her portrayal of Ronald Colman's wife in the Oscar-favorite A Double Life that solidified her fame. But as Hasso continued to act on the stage and TV, her film work began to taper off. She appeared in high-profile thrillers like Crisis (1950), several made-for-TV movies, a few European productions and even the cult murder mystery, Bert Gordon's Picture Mommy Dead (1966). In 1972, the king of Sweden decorated Hasso for her work. Her final appearance was in a 2001 documentary about Greta Garbo. HERMAN COHEN, 1927-2002 One of the key producers of B-movies, Herman Cohen, died June 2nd at the age of 76. Like most producers, his name wasn't generally known outside the industry or the realms of film buffs but most people never forget the titles of his films: I Was a Teenage Werewolf (1957), Horrors of the Black Museum (1959) and the not-quite-immortal Bela Lugosi Meets a Brooklyn Gorilla (1952). Cohen was a Detroit native, born August 27, 1927. He entered the film business in the smallest possible way, as a 12-year-old janitor, often accepting passes for his family and friends instead of wages. Cohen served in the Marine Corps (several articles incorrectly say the Army) before becoming a publicist at Columbia Pictures. By 1951 he was working as a producer's assistant on low-budget independent films, mostly for Realart Pictures run by another Detroit native Jack Broder. Soon Cohen was producing his own movies, including Westerns and mysteries, until hitting big with the famous I Was a Teenage Werewolf. Starring a then-unknown Michael Landon (under personal contract to Cohen who later tore it up so Landon could appear in Bonanza), the film was made for $100,000 but in just a few months grossed over $2 million. Cohen didn't hestitate to turn out I Was a Teenage Frankenstein and Blood of Dracula by Thanksgiving of that same year and before long had made several films that continued to earn money for years to come. (One TCM writer remembers Horrors of the Black Museum turning up in a small Alabama town in the early 70s, over a decade after its initial release. The film is scheduled for a DVD release with a Cohen commentary from VCI Entertainment.) Cohen also made several films in England including The Headless Ghost (1959) and the cult favorite Konga (1961) where Cohen even paid RKO $25,000 for the rights to use the title King Kong in publicity for his own film. Cohen's later movies included a spaghetti Western and Joan Crawford's final acting role Trog (1970). In the 1980s Cohen ran a company, Cobra Media, that distributed some films and licensed material such as Teenage Werewolf to Landon for use in one of his Highway to Heaven episodes. By Lang Thompson

Quotes

Girls like me weren't built to be educated. We were made to have children. That's my ambition: to be a walking, talking baby factory. Legal, of course. And with union labor.
- Tuggle Carpenter
Experience! That's what separates the girls from the Girl Scouts.
- Ryder Smith
Tuggle, are you a good girl?
- TV Thompson
Please, I don't want to disillusion you or disappoint you.
- Tuggle Carpenter
No, no, no, no. I won't be disillusioned or disappointed. Are you a good girl, Tuggle?
- TV Thompson
Ummhmm.
- Tuggle Carpenter
Oh...
- TV Thompson
I knew it.
- Tuggle Carpenter
Gentlemen, the city of Fort Lauderdale is once again under fire from the north. We've survived it before and I reckon we're gonna survive it again. To you newly installed officers on the force, I'd to give you a little rundown on what to expect. Expect anything. Anything and everything cause that's what you're gonna get. Now, Fort Lauderdale is not the only city to be invaded at this time. In Palm Springs and in Newport, from the beaches of the Mid Atlantic to the snows of Colorado, the students of America are gathering to celebrate the rites of spring. And, if you pardon a pun, you've got that right. They're our future voters, their citizens of our country, and they're our responsibility. But how the hell to handle them, that's a different manner. (laughter from officers) Now these kids didn't come down here to break the law. They'll break it for sure, but that's not their main objective. And remember that they are our guests. So, I want every man on the force to try his best, his level best, to try to avoid arresting anyone. I know that this going to take great will power but try. And, above all preserve your scene of humor. Cause you're gonna need it if you want to survive. And...God bless you all.
- Police Captain
Wait a minute! Haven't I seen you in here before?
- Police Captain
Just once, and it was purely by accident. The night my strap broke?
- Lola

Trivia

Notes

The working title for this film was The Unholy Spring. Voice-over narration preceding the opening credits introduces Fort Lauderdale, FL and explains that over 20,000 college students flock to the tropical vacation destination during the two weeks of spring break, turning the area into a "sizeable chunk of bedlam." The closing cast credits differ in order from the opening credits which read: "Dolores Hart, George Hamilton, Yvette Mimieux, Jim Hutton, Barbara Nichols, Paula Prentiss and Chill Wills."
       According to a December 30, 1959 Hollywood Reporter news item, Chuck Walters was signed to direct the film, but was later replaced by Henry Levin. A May 26, 1960 Hollywood Reporter news item stated that actor Burt Reynolds was originally considered for a role in the film. A October 21, 1960 Daily Variety article noted that producer Joe Pasternak cast mostly unknown younger actors in the film, in an attempt to change the control large stars had over the movie industry. According to a August 28, 1960 Los Angeles Examiner news item, Sean Flynn, son of Errol Flynn, was to make his debut in Where the Boys Are; however, his appearance in the film has not been confirmed. Paula Prentiss and popular singer Connie Francis made their feature film debuts in Where the Boys Are. A September 2, 1959 Hollywood Reporter news item adds Patricia Blair to the cast, but her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Portions of the film were shot on location in Fort Lauderdale, FL, where the film had a premiere on February 21, 1961, after it had opened in other cities.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 1960

Film debuts for Paula Prentiss and Connie Francis.

CinemaScope

Released in United States Winter January 1960