The Golden Child


1h 34m 1986

Brief Synopsis

After a Tibetan boy, the mystical Golden Child, is kidnapped by the evil Sardo Numspa, humankind's fate hangs in the balance. On the other side of the world in Los Angeles, the priestess Kee Nang seeks the Chosen One, who will save the boy from death. When Nang sees social worker Chandler Jarrell on television discussing his ability to find missing children, she solicits his expertise despite his skepticism over being chosen.

Film Details

Also Known As
Golden Child
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA; India; Los Angeles, California, USA; Monmoth Lakes, California, USA; Tibet, China

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m

Synopsis

After a Tibetan boy, the mystical Golden Child, is kidnapped by the evil Sardo Numspa, humankind's fate hangs in the balance. On the other side of the world in Los Angeles, the priestess Kee Nang seeks the Chosen One, who will save the boy from death. When Nang sees social worker Chandler Jarrell on television discussing his ability to find missing children, she solicits his expertise despite his skepticism over being chosen.

Crew

Ellen Adolph

Production Auditor

Greg Agalsoff

Boom Operator

Jim Alexander

Sound Mixer

Emin Aljuwani

Craft Service

Jess Anscott

Other

John A Armstrong

Animator

Carl Assmus

Other

Gordon Baker

Animator

Stewart Barbee

Camera Operator

Elizabeth Barrington

Stunts

John Barry

Music

Greg Beaumonte

Other

William R Beck

Visual Effects

Barry Bedig

Property Master

Rohinton Behramshan

Photography

Hans Beimler

Assistant Director

Pamela Bentkowski

Foley Editor

Irving Berlin

Song

Ray Bickel

Stunts

Cameron Birnie

Assistant Art Director

Simone Boisseree

Stunts

Mike Bolles

Other

Conrad Bonderson

Other

Tim Boxell

Technical Advisor

James T Boyle

Lighting Technician

Barbara Brennan

Rotoscope Animator

Sue Brooks

Assistant

Alexandra Brouwer

Assistant

Joseph Brown

Production Assistant

Kris Brown

Other

Robbie Buchanan

Song Performer

Robbie Buchanan

Original Music

Rob Burton

Animator

Jeff Cadiente

Stunts

Paul Calabria

Animal Trainer

Judy Cammer

Set Designer

Jeff Carson

Music Editor

Lanny Cermak

Other

Vartan Chakirian

Craft Service

Michael Chaney

Dolly Grip

Karen Chase

Stunts

Ken Chase

Makeup

Wade Childress

Photography

Phil Chong

Stunts

Terry Chostner

Camera Operator

Namita Chukherburti

Wardrobe

Robin Chukherburti

Property Master

Blair Clark

Other

John Clayton

Construction

Fetteroff Colen

Production Assistant

Michel Colombier

Song

Michel Colombier

Original Music

Michel Colombier

Music

Steve Conrow

Props

Al Contreras

Grip

Lane Cooper

Stunts

Kim Costalupes

Assistant Editor

Mario Costillo

Props

Juan Croucier

Song

Bob K Cummings

Stunts

Dan Curry

Consultant

Frank Davis

Production Assistant

Vincent Deadrick

Stunts

Warren Demartini

Song

Karin Dew

Animal Trainer

Mike Dobie

Sound Editor

Jeff Doran

Other

Karen Dube

Other

Christopher Duddy

Other

Sheila Duignan

Other

Larry Duran

Stunts

Cheryl Durham

Production Accountant

Randal M Dutra

Visual Effects

Pamela Easley

Effects Coordinator

Juno J. Ellis

Adr Editor

W Alexander Ellis

Assistant Director

Sue Ennis

Theme Lyrics

Julia Evershade

Sound Editor

Emil Farkas

Stunts

Scott Farrar

Camera Operator

John Paul Fasal

Sound Effects

Dennis Feldman

Coproducer

Dennis Feldman

Screenplay

Edward Feldman

Producer

Shari Feldman

Costumes

Wayne Finkelman

Costume Designer

Bob Finley

Pyrotechnics

Robert Finley Iii

Other

Joe Finnegan

Stunts

George Fisher

Stunts

Kenneth Frith

Production Assistant

Michael Fulmer

Visual Effects

Arish Fyzee

Assistant Director

Carlos M Gallardo

Grip

Donna Garrett

Stunts

Michael Gershman

Camera Operator

Mickey Gilbert

Stunt Coordinator

Troy Gilbert

Stunts

Danny Gill

Special Effects

Len Glascow

Stunts

Daniel C Gold

Assistant Camera Operator

Joyce Gordon

Props

Caroleen Green

Matte Painter

Judee Gustafson

Sound Editor

Shama Habibullah

Production Manager

Joanne Hafner

Rotoscope Animator

Jim Hagedorn

Camera Operator

Robert S Hahn

Camera Operator

Cecelia Hall

Sound Editor

Chris Hammond

Storyboard Artist

David Hanks

Camera Assistant

Kimberly Harris

Sound Editor

Richard A Harris

Editor

Orwin Harvey

Stunts

Thomas E Hayes

Lighting Technician

Toby Heindel

Camera Assistant

David Heron

Other

Joe Hicks

Grip

Robert Hill

Camera Assistant

Larry Holt

Stunts

Craig Hosoda

Other

Jeff Imada

Stunts

Ronald A Jacobs

Sound Editor

Yeti Jindal

Location Manager

John C Johnson

Production

Ralph Johnson

Lighting Technician

Dan Jordan

Grip

Rajesh Joshi

Photography

Sean Joyce

Matte Painter

Susan V Kalinowski

Hair

Jay Kamen

Adr Editor

Pamela J Kaye

Production Accountant

Ira Keeler

Visual Effects

Gary Kieldrup

Property Master Assistant

Bill Kimberlin

Editor In Chief

John Knoll

Animator

Brad Kuehn

Other

Ajit Kumar

Assistant Director

Ron Lambert

Color Timer

Gregg Landaker

Sound

Jim Lapidus

Costumes

Steve Laporte

Makeup

David Lebell

Stunts

Gene Lebell

Stunts

Carol Lefko

Casting Associate

Al Leong

Stunts

Victoria Lewis

Visual Effects

Ellen Lichtwardt

Animation Supervisor

James Lim

Camera Operator

Roger Lipsey

Props

Robert J Litt

Sound

Greg Luntzel

Photography

Tom Mack

Assistant Director

Mike Mackenzie

Other

Marvin March

Set Decorator

Tamia Marg

Other

Eddie Marks

Costume Supervisor

Kim Marks

Camera Operator

Dan Marrow

Transportation Captain

Robert Marta

Camera Operator

Antonio Martinez Garcia

Costumes

Bob Mayne

Transportation Captain

Patrick Mcardle

Camera Assistant

Matt Mccolm

Stunts

George Mcdowell

Production Assistant

Roberto Mcgrath

Photography

Pat Mcgroarty

Stunts

Bill Mcintosh

Stunts

Ken Mcleod

Technical Advisor

Charles R Meeker

Executive Producer

John C. Meier

Stunts

Sam Mendoza

Props

Eric M Miller

Stunts

Tawny Mobley-davis

Other

Patricia Mock

Casting

Craig Mohagen

Other

David Moll

Property Master

Jack Mongovan

Rotoscope Animator

Deborah M Morgan

Camera Assistant

Gary Morgan

Stunts

Jody Muggenthaler

Production Accountant

Claudia Mullaly

Visual Effects

G S Murthy

Cashier

Dawn Nallick

Stunts

Edward R. Nedin

Lighting Technician

Mark T. Noel

Special Effects

Kerry Nordquist

Photography

Peter Norman

Unit Director

Rod Nunnally

Art Department

Emmitt-leon O'neill

Assistant Director

Alan Oliney

Stunts

James Orendorff

Construction

Ken Orme

Property Master Assistant

Noon Orsatti

Stunts

Chris Oswald

Stunts

Chris Thomas Palomino

Stunts

Udo Pampel

Other

Michael Pangrazio

Matte Painter

Mark Pappas

Sound Editor

Lynda Paradise

Art Director

Film Details

Also Known As
Golden Child
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1986
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures
Location
New York City, New York, USA; India; Los Angeles, California, USA; Monmoth Lakes, California, USA; Tibet, China

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 34m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Tcm Remembers - Michael Ritchie

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 12, 1986

Released in United States on Video July 1987

Began shooting February 18, 1986.

Released in United States Winter December 12, 1986

Released in United States on Video July 1987