MULAN


1m 1998

Brief Synopsis

Based on a Chinese folk-tale, Mulan is a young high-spirited girl who tries hard to please her parents but always feels like she is disappointing them. Her father is drafted into the army which amounts to certain death because of his old age. Mulan disguises herself as a man and takes her father's p

Film Details

MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Adventure
Comedy
Family
Musical
Period
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1m

Synopsis

Based on a Chinese folk-tale, Mulan is a young high-spirited girl who tries hard to please her parents but always feels like she is disappointing them. Her father is drafted into the army which amounts to certain death because of his old age. Mulan disguises herself as a man and takes her father's p

Crew

Dominic A'vant

Inbetweener

John Aardal

Camera Operator

Benjamin William Adams

Other

Adeboye Saburi Adegbenro

Other

Susan Adnopoz

Assistant

Christina Aguilera

Song Performer

Julius Aguimatang

From Story

Faris Al-saffar

Other

Joyce Alexander

Other

Graham S Allan

Other

Philip J Allora

Other

Paulo R Alvarado

Inbetweener

Carmen R Alvarez

Production

Leyla Amaro-pelaez

Makeup

Raul E Anaya

Other

Bruce R Anderson

Production

Scott W Anderson

Visual Effects

Bill Andres

Other

Merritt R Andrews

Assistant

Jonathan Annand

Inbetweener

Tony Anselmo

Assistant

Sunny Apinchapong

Other

Ruben Azama Aquino

Animator

Carlos R Arancibia

Inbetweener

Stella P Arbelaez Tascon

Other

Janice Armiger

Inbetweener

Debra Armstrong

Assistant

Stephen Nelson Austin

Other

Kirk Axtell

Other

Gregg Azzopardi

Inbetweener

Hans Bacher

Production Designer

Robert Bagley

Post-Production Coordinator

Kathleen M Bailey

Visual Effects

D Jay Baker

Other

James Baker

Animator

Tom Baker

Other

Dorothea Baker Paul

Assistant

Tom Bancroft

Animator

Kevin A Barber

Other

Judith A Barnes

Assistant

Richard M Barnes

Other

B H Barry

Advisor

Augusto Borges Bastos

Assistant

Robert Bayless

Music

Brian Orlando Beauchamp

Assistant

Guner Behich

3-D Artist

Rob Bekuhrs

Animator

Carl Angus Bell

Assistant

Glenn Bell

Other

Janelle Bell-martin

Inbetweener

Savino Bellini

Video

George Benavides

Inbetweener

John Bender

Camera

Lon Bender

Sound Design

Michael Benet

Animator

Bob Bennett

Visual Effects

Rune Brandt Bennicke

Animator

Theresa Bentz

Editor

Bill Berg

Assistant

Fred Berning

Other

Douglas Berterman

Song

Douglas Bertermann

Music Arranger

Ron Betta

Production Assistant

Munir A Bhatti

Other

Matt Bialosuknia

Other

Rachel Renee Bibb

Assistant

Peter Bielicki

Other

Phyllis Bird

Other

Katherine Blackmore

Assistant

Gary Blair

Assistant Editor

Aaron Blaise

Animator

Travis Blaise

Animator

Robert Blalock

Other

Russell Blandino

Assistant

Diana Blazer

Color

S J Bleick

Other

Saul Andrew Blinkoff

Other

Mike Blum

Other

Allen Blyth

Visual Effects

Kirk Bodyfelt

Production Manager

Paul Bogaev

Song

Cyndy Bohonovsky

Other

Michael Bolds

Other

Jamie Kezlarian Bolio

Assistant

Daniel Bond

Assistant

Charlie Bonifacio

Animator

Jason Boose

Inbetweener

Eugenia Bostwick-singer

Screenplay

Bruce Botnick

Sound Mixer

Patsy L Bouge

Assistant Editor

Elliot M Bour

Animator

Bryan Bowen

Sound Editor

Verrell Bowers

Inbetweener

Philip S Boyd

Visual Effects

David Braden

2-D Animator

Chris Bradley

Animator

Susan Bradley

Titles

Patti Braskie

Other

Russell Braun

Inbetweener

Jo Ann Breuer

2-D Animator

Paul Briggs

Animator

Todd Bright

Assistant

Brad Brooks

Other

Kristine Brown

Animator

Jeanette Browning

Sound Dubbing

Jim Brummett

Other

Paul Buckmaster

Other

Kristen Ann Bulmer

Other

Letha L Burchard

Other

Scott A Burroughs

Assistant

Jason Leonard Robert Buske

Visual Effects

Joey Calderon

Other

Ofra Afuta Calderon

Other

William J Caparella

Associate Editor

Scott Caple

Layout Artist

Rodolfo Cardenas

Production Assistant

Mark R Carlson

Other

Vince Caro

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Dominic M Carola

Animator

Chris Carpenter

Costumes

Irma Cartaya

Color

Hortensia M Casagran

Other

Nhi Casey

Other

John Cashman

Inbetweener

Janice M Caston

Other

Darko Cesar

Animator

Arden Chan

Other

Mimi Chan

Advisor

Chen-yi Chang

Other

Lillian A Chapman

Assistant

Alex Chatfield

Other

Richard P Chavez

Visual Effects Designer

Ray Chen

Assistant

Karen N China

2-D Animator

Jerry Yu Ching

Animator

Chang Yei Cho

Other

Inna Chon

Assistant

Carol J Choy

Other

Loren Chun

Other

Peter L Chun

Other

Wesley Chun

Assistant

Joey So Chun Yin

Other

Anthony M Cipriano

Art Department

Terry Claborn

Color Timer

Michael Clay

Other

Caroline Clifford

Assistant

Stephanie Clifford

Production Assistant

Pam Coats

Producer

Diana Coco

Assistant

Casey Coffey

Inbetweener

Earl Scott Coffman

Visual Effects

Ron Cohee

Assistant

Dan Cohen

Other

Sarah J Cole

2-D Animator

Ray C Coleman

Other

Shirley Collier

Assistant Production Accountant

Charles Collins

Other

Beth Collins-stegmaier

Animator

Brad Condie

Inbetweener

Lorna Cook

From Story

Tod Cooper

Music

Frank R Cordero

Other

Robert O Corley

Animator

Tony Cosanella

Production Assistant

Alexander Courage

Music Arranger

Stephen R Craig

Animator

Sheri Croft

Character Animation

James Michael Crossley

Animator

Caroline Cruikshank

Animator

Don Crum

Other

Jefferson Crutchfield

Other

Lynnette Cullen

2-D Animator

Antoine Cunnigham

Inbetweener

John R Cunningham

Camera

Sherrie Cuzzort

Color

Sybil Cuzzort

Other

Florida D'ambrosio

Other

Val D'arcy

2-D Animator

Michael D'isa

Inbetweener

Lea Dahleen

Other

Deborah G Dalton

Production Assistant

Dan Daly

Assistant

Tammy Daniel-biske

Other

Eric Dapkewicz

Production Assistant

Andrew Davenport

Production Assistant

Cheryl Davis

Camera Trainee

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Dean Deblois

From Story

Antony Defato

Assistant

Ron Defelice

Background Artist

Peter J Deluca

Assistant

Jean Cullen Demoura

Inbetweener

Marcelo Fernades Demoura

Animator

John Derderian

Camera Operator

Tom Derosier

Other

Peter Deseve

Visual Effects Designer

Kevin Deters

Assistant

Robert Edward Dettloff

Other

Jeff Dickson

Other

Frank Dietz

Inbetweener

Film Details

MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Adventure
Comedy
Family
Musical
Period
Release Date
1998
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Florida, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1m

Award Nominations

Best Score (Musical or Comedy)

1998

Articles

Pat Morita (1932-2005)


Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73.

He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy.

He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles.

Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype.

However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality.

He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities.

He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita (1932-2005)

Pat Morita, the diminutive Asian-American actor who found lasting fame, and an Oscar® nomination, as Kesuke Miyagi, the janitor that teaches Ralph Macchio the fine art of karate in the hit film, The Karate Kid (1984), died on November 24 of natural causes in his Las Vegas home. He was 73. He was born Noriyuki Morita on June 28, 1932 in Isleton, California. The son of migrant fruit pickers, he contracted spinal tuberculosis when he was two and spent the next nine years in a sanitarium run by Catholic priests near Sacramento. He was renamed Pat, and after several spinal surgical procedures and learning how to walk, the 11-year-old Morita was sent to an internment camp at Gila River, Arizona, joining his family and thousands of other Japanese-Americans who were shamefully imprisoned by the U.S. government after Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. His family was released after the war, and Morita graduated from high school in Fairfield, California in 1950. He worked in his family's Chinese restaurant in Sacramento until his father was killed in a hit-and-run accident. He eventually found work as a data processor for the Department of Motor Vehicles and then Aerojet General Corporation before he decided to try his hand at stand-up comedy. He relocated to San Francisco in 1962, where at first, there was some hesitation from clubs to book a Japanese-American comic, but Morita's enthusiasm soon warmed them over, and he was becoming something of a regional hit in all the Bay Area. His breakthrough came in 1964 when he was booked on ABC's The Hollywood Palace. The image of a small, unassuming Asian with the broad mannerisms and delivery of a modern American was something new in its day. He was a hit, and soon found more bookings on the show. And after he earned the nickname "the hip nip," he quickly began headlining clubs in Las Vegas and Los Angeles. Morita's stage and television success eventually led him to films. He made his movie debut as "Oriental #2," the henchman to Beatrice Lilly in the Julie Andrew's musical Thoroughly Modern Millie (1967). Although his role, complete with thick coke-bottle glasses and gaping overbite, was a little hard to watch, it was the best he could do at the time. Subsequent parts, as in Don Knott's dreadful The Shakiest Gun in the West (1968); and Bob Hope's lamentable final film Cancel My Reservations (1972); were simply variations of the same stereotype. However, television was far kinder to Morita. After some popular guest appearances in the early '70s on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, and The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson, Morita landed some semi-regular work. First, as the wisecracking, cigar chomping Captain Sam Pack on M.A.S.H. and as Ah Chew, the deadpan neighbor of Fred and Lamont Sanford in Sanford & Son. His success in these roles led to his first regular gig, as Arnold Takahashi in Happy Days. His stint as the owner of the soda shop where Ritchie Cunningham and the Fonz hung out for endless hours may have been short lived (just two seasons 1974-76), but it was Morita's first successful stab at pop immortality. He left Happy Days to star in his own show, the critically savaged culture clash sitcom Mr. T and Tina that was canceled after just five episodes. Despite that setback, Morita rebounded that same year with his first dramatic performance, and a fine one at that, when he portrayed a Japanese-American internment camp survivor in the moving made for television drama Farewell to Manzanar (1976). After a few more guest appearances on hit shows (Magnum P.I., The Love Boat etc.), Morita found the goldmine and added new life to his career when he took the role of Miyagi in The Karate Kid (1984). Playing opposite Ralph Macchio, the young man who becomes his martial arts pupil, Morita was both touching and wise, and the warm bond he created with Macchio during the course of the film really proved that he had some serious acting chops. The flick was the surprise box-office hit of 1984, and Morita's career, if briefly, opened up to new possibilities. He scored two parts in television specials that were notable in that his race was never referenced: first as the horse in Alice in Wonderland (1985); and as the toymaster in Babes in Toyland (1986). He also landed a detective show (with of course, comic undertones) that ran for two seasons Ohara (1987-89); nailed some funny lines in Honeymoon in Vegas (1992); was the sole saving grace of Gus Van Zandt's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues (1993); and starred in all of the sequels to The Karate Kid: The Karate Kid, Part II (1986), The Karate Kid, Part III (1989), and The Next Karate Kid (1994). Granted, it is arguable that Morita's career never truly blossomed out of the "wise old Asian man" caricature. But give the man his due, when it came to infusing such parts with sly wit and sheer charm, nobody did it better. Morita is survived by his wife, Evelyn; daughters, Erin, Aly and Tia; his brother, Harry, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer June 19, 1998

Released in United States on Video February 2, 1998

Released in United States on Video February 2, 1999

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States August 1998

Released in United States September 1998

Released in United States 2014

Shown at Locarno International Film Festival (opening night) August 5-15, 1998.

Shown at Bangkok Film Festival September 18-26, 1998.

Began shooting January 1, 1995.

Released in United States Summer June 19, 1998

Released in United States on Video February 2, 1998

Released in United States on Video February 2, 1999

Released in United States 1998 (Film had its overseas premiere at the 1998 Locarno International Film Festival.)

Released in United States August 1998 (Shown at Locarno International Film Festival (opening night) August 5-15, 1998.)

Released in United States September 1998 (Shown at Bangkok Film Festival September 18-26, 1998.)

Released in United States 2014 (U.S. Features)

Completed shooting spring 1998.