Kate & Leopold


2h 1m 2001

Brief Synopsis

When two strangers meet in New York City, a century's worth of differences come crashing together. Kate McKay is a modern-day executive, a 21st century woman driven to succeed in the corporate world. Leopold, the Third Duke of Albany, is a charming 19th century bachelor. Each has grown weary of wait...

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Fantasy
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Synopsis

When two strangers meet in New York City, a century's worth of differences come crashing together. Kate McKay is a modern-day executive, a 21st century woman driven to succeed in the corporate world. Leopold, the Third Duke of Albany, is a charming 19th century bachelor. Each has grown weary of waiting for love. But when a dramatic twist of fate lands Leopold in present-day New York, they must confront the prospect of a love affair 100 years in the making.

Crew

Thomas Ahlers

Office Assistant

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunts

Amy Andrews

Costume Supervisor

Mary Andrews

Adr Editor

Jessica Archer

Location Coordinator

Max De Armon

Construction

Joann Atwood

On-Set Dresser

Curtis Augspurger

Rotoscope Animator

Curtis Augspurger

Visual Effects Producer

John Baer

Photography

Stephen A Baker

Grip

Kerry Barden

Casting

Ted Barela

Recording Engineer

Robert Barnett

Camera

Eric Bart

Scenic Artist

Steven Barth

Scenic Artist

Lisa Beach

Casting Director

Christine Beebe

Set Decorator

Andrew Benepe

Sculptor

Mark Bennett

Casting Associate

Bill W Benton

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Christopher Biggins

Assistant

Tony Blondal

Original Music

Tracy Bolt

Rerecording

Charlie Bouis

Recording Engineer

David Boulton

Adr Mixer

Daniel Brandes

Carpenter

Terri Brennan

On-Set Dresser

David Brenner

Editor

Connie Brink Jr.

Special Effects Foreman

Connie Brink

Special Effects Coordinator

Andrew Buckland

Apprentice Editor

Thomas Buckman

Transportation Co-Captain

Paul Bucossi

Stunts

Pete Bucossi

Stunt Coordinator

Victor Bucossi

Stunts

Kristine Bulakowski

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Sandra Bullock

Producer

Diana E Burton

Property Master

Gene Buser

Apprentice

Jay Carrado

Stunts

Stephanie Carroll

Set Decorator

Jerry Cetrulo

Stunts

Victor Chan

Stunts

Guy Charbonneau

Recording Engineer

Nicolas Charuet

Grip

Michael Chock

Dialogue Editor

Ellen Christiansen

Set Decorator

Molly Clayton

Casting Assistant

Dominick Cocuzzo

Grip

Steve Coleman

Sound Engineer

Buckley Collum

Visual Effects Supervisor

Buckley Collum

Cg Supervisor

Steve Comesky

Best Boy Electric

Stephen Consentino

Steadicam Operator

Stephen Consentino

Camera Operator

Joseph Conti

3-D Artist

Brian Cooper

Assistant Production Coordinator

John Copeman

Stunts

Pete Corby

Stunts

Tom Costabile

Construction Coordinator

Sara Cueva

Apprentice Editor

Gavin Curran

Swing

Robert Currie

On-Set Dresser

Alan Dangerio

Hair Stylist

Marie Davis

Visual Effects

Eva Davy

Scenic Artist

Aaron Dawley

Grip

Bob Descaine

Adr Mixer

Stracy Diaz

Stunts

Katy Dilkes

Scenic Artist

Deborah Maxwell Dion

Casting Associate

Stuart Dryburgh

Director Of Photography

Guy Efrat

Location Scout

Gene Engels

Gaffer

Alyson Evans

Production Supervisor

Roy Farfel

Stunts

Michael Farrow

Music Scoring Mixer

Debora Fearon

Craft Service

Armando Fente

Assistant Editor

Carrie Fisher

Other

Jamie K Fitzpatrick

Assistant Camera

Brian Fitzsimons

Grip

Andrew Fleming

Other

Donald Flick

Visual Effects Editor

Mark Friedberg

Production Designer

Charley Furey

Carpenter

John Gallas

Security

Anthony Gamiello

Grip

Christopher Gamiello

Grip

Dennis Gamiello

Key Grip

Dennis Gamiello

Grip

Ellen Gannon

Production Coordinator

Shannon Blake Gans

Miniatures

Heather Gauntt

Location Scout

Daniel Geary

Carpenter

Howell Gibbens

Supervising Sound Editor

Peter Gleaves

Adr Mixer

James Glisson Iii

Scenic Artist

Harvey Goldberg

On-Set Dresser

Jess Gonchor

Art Director

Christopher Goode

Coproducer

Christopher Goode

Unit Production Manager

Anthony Gore

Post-Production Supervisor

Matthew Gratzner

Miniatures

Michael Odell Green

Scenic Artist

Thomas Gregory

Carpenter

Roman Greller

On-Set Dresser

Lee Grubin

Assistant Editor

Dan Guachione

Boom Operator

Carlos Guerra

Assistant Camera

Vincent Guisetti

Foley Artist

Jeffrey J. Haboush

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

James Harker

Swing

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

Kenneth Harris

Stunts

Joanna Hartell

On-Set Dresser

Arlene Hellerman

Researcher

Michael Herlihy

Foreman

Don J Hewitt

Stunts

Don Hewitt

Stunts

Jery Hewitt

Stunts

Nicholas Hill

Greensman

Elizabeth Hirsch

Production Manager

Mark S Hoerr

Post-Production Supervisor

Billy Hopkins

Casting

Ian Hunter

Miniatures

Alex Jablonski

Dga Trainee

Andrew Jack

Dialect Coach

Josh Jacobs

Assistant

Zachary Jasie

Assistant Property Master

Lukasz Jogalla

Camera Operator

Justin Johnson

Digital Effects Artist

Dr. Ken Jones

Visual Effects Supervisor

Pamela Nedd Kahn

Foley Artist

Janet Kalas

Scenic Artist

Henry Kaplan

On-Set Dresser

Karen Kawahara

Makeup Artist

Bruce Kaye

Assistant

Kathleen Kearny

Assistant

Kristen Keck

Office Assistant

Stephen M Kelley

Makeup Artist

Larry Kemp

Dialogue Editor

Rolfe Kent

Music

Elizabeth Kenton

Dialogue Editor

Paul Kinghan

Swing

Claire L Kirk

Art Department Coordinator

Cathy Konrad

Producer

Adam Kreps

Office Assistant

Steve Kupp

Office Assistant

Rob Landoll

Scenic Artist

Victoria Lang

Assistant

Amy Lauritsen

Assistant Director

Hoang Le

Carpenter

Hoang Le

Welder

Christine Leaman

Location Scout

Keri Lynn Lederman

Assistant Property Master

Iris H. Lemos

Costumer

Elizabeth Linn

Scenic Artist

Lily Lodge

Consultant

Howard London

Adr Mixer

Miguel Lopez-castillo

Art Director

Edward W Lowry

Dolly Grip

James Mah

Swing

James Mangold

Screenplay

Nicholas C Mastandrea

Assistant Director

Francis J Mcbride

Rigging Grip

Marilyn Mccoppen

Adr Editor

Michael Mccusker

Assistant Editor

An Mclaughlin

Sound

Jack Mclaughlin

Stunts

Timothy Metivier

Assistant Camera

John Milcetic

Swing

F Ron Miller

Main Title Design

Monique Mitchell

Grip

Suzanne Mitus-uribe

Digital Effects Artist

James Morioka

Assistant Sound Editor

Kellie Morrison

Assistant Location Manager

Kevin Mullins

Grip

Bob Murphy

Grip

Kip Myers

Location Scout

Don Nace

Scenic Artist

Ana Nasser

Post-Production Assistant

Hilary Niederer

Wardrobe Assistant

Gretchen O'neal

Music Coordinator

Gregory Oehler

Digital Effects Artist

Donald Oldaker

Stunts

Kerry Orent

Executive Producer

Neil Orlowski

Loader

Janine Pesce

On-Set Dresser

Kristie Phillips

Auditor

Mike Phillips

Production Accountant

Patricia Porter

Accountant

Meryl Poster

Executive Producer

Mathew Price

Sound Mixer

Romano Pugliese

On-Set Dresser

Jodi Michelle Pynn

Stunts

Robert Pyzocha

Models

John D Quaglia

Hair Stylist

James Quinn

Best Boy Grip

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Fantasy
Romantic Comedy
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
MIRAMAX
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 1m

Award Nominations

Best Song

2001

Articles

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole
Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States May 2001

Released in United States on Video November 5, 2002

Released in United States Winter December 25, 2001

Shown at Cannes International Film Festival (market) May 9-20, 2001.

Andy Fleming was previously attached to direct.

Sandra Bullock was previously attached to star.

Began shooting February 20, 2001.

Completed shooting May 22, 2001.

Released in United States May 2001 (Shown at Cannes International Film Festival (market) May 9-20, 2001.)

Released in United States on Video November 5, 2002

Released in United States Winter December 25, 2001