Rush Hour 2


1h 30m 2001

Brief Synopsis

A Hong Kong trip turns into a working vacation when two detectives stumble on a counterfeiting ring.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rush Hour 2: The Return of the Dragon, Rush Hour II
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Crime
Sequel
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
NEW LINE CINEMA (NEW LINE)
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Hong Kong; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Synopsis

Chief Inspector Lee of the Hong Kong Police and LAPD detective James Carter go to Hong Kong on a much needed vacation. Carter is looking forward to discovering the city for the first time. But when they arrive, they discover a bomb has exploded in the American Embassy, killing two U.S. customs agents who had been investigating a counterfeiting ring. The Hong Kong police suspect that Triad crime lord Ricky Tan is behind the blast. Inspector Lee is assigned to crack the case, much to the chagrin of Carter who is annoyed as he feels his vacation slipping away. But for Lee the case is personal -- Tan was once his father's police partner and played a direct role in his death. The two cops set off in pursuit of Tan, but this time around it is Detective Carter who is a fish out of water and Lee now has the chance to teach him some lessons. But of course, as the pair chase Tan from Hong Kong to Los Angeles and beyond, Carter has a few things to teach the locals as well.

Crew

Tsuyoshi Abe

Stunts

Matthew Adams

Visual Effects

Mary Albee

Stunts

Phalon Alexander

Song

Bradley James Allan

Stunts

Paul Andreovski

Stunts

Marty Angelo

On-Set Dresser

Richard Artman

Grip

Linda C Azevedo

Auditor

Bill Baker

Key Grip

Carmen Baker

Supervising Sound Editor

Mark Balda

Other

Melanie Banders

Camera Assistant

Bruce Barbour

Stunts

Rodney P Barnes

Assistant

Tricia Barrett

Accounting Assistant

Daniel W. Barringer

Stunts

Matt Barry

Casting

Bob Bayless

Music

Gary A Beaird

Grip

Kevin Beck

Production Assistant

Mark D Berrend

Props

Justin Bird

Video Assist/Playback

Roger Birnbaum

Producer

R Michael Bisetti

Special Effects

Erik Black

Special Thanks To

Anthony Blanding

Assistant

Lee Blasingame

Camera Assistant

Robert Bleckman

Assistant Property Master

Patrick R Blymer

Lighting Technician

Charles Fred Bobbit

Song

Paul Boots

Driver

Gustavo Borner

Sound Mixer

Bob Bowen

Music Coordinator

Bill Bowling

Unit Location Manager

Eddie Braun

Stunt Coordinator

Chris Brenczewski

Special Effects Assistant

Jim Brookshire

Dialogue Editor

Paul Broucek

Music

Craig Brown

Grip

Foxy Brown

Song Performer

James Brown

Song

Jeanette Browning

Adr

Eddie Buggie

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Ray Bulinski

Craft Service

Richard Burch

Driver

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Charles Butler

Grip

Andrew Max Cahn

Art Director

Bruce Callahan

Driver

James D Camomile

Special Effects

Gregory Campbell

Driver

Frank Capp

Music Contractor

Richard L Carden

Dolly Grip

Felton Carter

Driver

Laurie Cartwright

Other

David S Cass

Production Supervisor

David S Cass

Assistant Director

Tom Ceglia

Special Effects Assistant

Madalena Chan

Location Casting

Willie Chan

Special Thanks To

Anita S. Chang

Assistant

Tim Chau

Sound Design

Tim Chau

Rerecording

Jessica Chavez

Assistant

Don Cheadle

Other

E.c. Chen

Set Designer

Andy Cheng

Stunts

Arnold Chon

Stunts

Rob Cohen

Song

Sean Combs

Song Performer

Jennifer Conroy

Production Coordinator

Judy Cook

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Brian Covey

Special Thanks To

James M. Cox

Rigging Gaffer

Ronald Wayne Cox

Props

King Curtis

Song Performer

Andy D'addario

Rerecording

Tom Dahl

Rerecording

Alex Daniels

Stunts

Regina Shek Ying Dardis

Other

Rene Dashiell

Makeup Artist

Andrew Z. Davis

Executive Producer

Ron Davis

Other

William P Davis

Driver

Mark Davison

Camera Operator

Michael De Luca

Executive Producer

Stel Deleon

Accounting Assistant

Brandee Dell'aringa

Assistant Art Director

Amy Disarro

Makeup Artist

Brian Dixon

Other

Mark Dobrogowski

Driver

Nate Dogg

Song Performer

Joe Dubs

Visual Effects

Leon Dudevoir

Co-Executive Producer

Rickley W Dumm

Assistant Sound Editor

Mathew Dunne

Assistant Director

Steve Earle

Driver

Roger Eastham

Other

Randy Edelman

Song

Jeff Egan

Medic

Peggy Eghbalian

Assistant Editor

Andre Ellingson

Special Effects Supervisor

Erik Ellner

Production

Toby Emmerich

Executive Producer

Kenny Endoso

Stunts

Jeannie Epper

Stunts

Kendall Errair

Set Costumer

Eduardo H. Esparza

Props

Faith Evans

Song Performer

Kim Ferry

Hair Stylist

John W Fisher

Special Effects Assistant

Ruy Folguera

Music

Linda Folk

Adr Editor

Frank Foster

Song

Adam Ben Frank

Assistant Director

Jamie Freitag

Associate Producer

Jamie Freitag

Assistant Director

Joshua Gallegos

Production Assistant

Michael R Gannon

Assistant Property Master

Richie Gaona

Other

David R Garcia

Craft Service

Tony Garrison

Sound Mixer

Peter Geraghty

Camera Assistant

St Germaine

Song Performer

Glenn Gillette

Special Thanks To

Emily Glatter

Production Coordinator

Jonathan Glickman

Producer

Meridith Gold

Assistant Editor

Oscar Gomez

Best Boy

Mike Goodall

Driver

Oscar Goodman

Special Thanks To

Joseph A Graham

Grip

Todd Greenberg

Special Thanks To

Joe Greene

Song

John Grendon

Other

Linda Griffis

Art Department Coordinator

Mari Grimaud

Costume Supervisor

Mark S Haberman

Electrician

Nathaniel Hale

Song

Darrell Hall

Music Editor

David Hall

Driver

Jennifer Hall Lee

Miniatures

Edward T. Hanley

Set Costumer

Mitzi Haralson

Set Costumer

Kimberly Harris

Sound Mixer

Kimberly Harris

Sound Editor

Janice Hayen

Other

Dean Head

Photography

Ira Hearshen

Music Arranger

Neal Hefti

Song

Mark Helfrich

Editor

Mark A Hicks

Stunts

Voni Hinkle

Hair

Cindy Jo Hinkleman

Assistant Sound Editor

Justin Holdsworth

Other

Bill Holmquist

Construction Coordinator

Lee Hong

Other

Vicki S Horwits

Special Thanks To

Sarah Huber-donohoe

Art Department

Melanie Hughes-weaver

Makeup

Chad Hugo

Song

Carole Humphreys

Other

Matthew Humphreys

Accounting Assistant

Arkay Hur

Visual Effects

Patrick Ingram

Production Assistant

Charles Martin Inouye

Music Editor

Chris Jackson

Editor

Doug Jackson

Sound Effects

Michael Jackson

Song

Michael Jackson

Song Performer

Stephen Janisz

Adr Editor

Nils C Jensen

Supervising Sound Editor

Tim Jensen

Driver

Christopher Michael Johnson

Casting Associate

Eliot Johnson

Assistant

Mark Benton Johnson

Location Manager

Wayne Johnson

Stand-In

Darryl Jones

Associate Producer

John Joyce

Visual Effects

Virginia Joyce

Accountant

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Diana Kaufman

Post-Production Supervisor

Mark S. Kaufman

Music

Tom Keefer

Grip

Doug Keegan

Electrician

Kenny Keene

On-Set Dresser

David Kern

Sound Effects

Beatriz Kerti

Assistant Art Director

John C Key

Driver

Nancy Green Keyes

Casting

Andrew Kim

Production Assistant

Jason King

Sound Effects

Marc A Klutznick

Assistant Production Coordinator

Hilary Klym

Grip

Steve Kohler

Other

Troy R Kramer

Craft Service

Susan B Kreutz

Craft Service

Bruce Kuroyama

Special Effects

Peter Lam Kin Ngok

Special Thanks To

Film Details

Also Known As
Rush Hour 2: The Return of the Dragon, Rush Hour II
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Crime
Sequel
Release Date
2001
Distribution Company
NEW LINE CINEMA (NEW LINE)
Location
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Hong Kong; Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 30m

Articles

Rush Hour 2


The hilariously mismatched cross-cultural odd couple of Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker team up for the second time in Brett Ratner's action comedy Rush Hour 2 (2001). In this sequel to 1998's box office smash Rush Hour, Detective James Carter (Tucker) and Chief Inspector Lee (Chan) find themselves foregoing a much needed vacation after there is a bombing at the American Embassy in Hong Kong. When the duo investigates, it looks like powerful gangster Ricky Tan (John Lone) may hold the key to some criminal activity in the Hong Kong underworld. As the plot thickens, a dangerous femme fatale (Zhang Ziyi), a shady businessman (Alan King) and a gorgeous secret service agent (Roselyn Sanchez) all add to the mix of colorful characters. The non-stop action moves from China, to Los Angeles, and on to Las Vegas for an exciting climax, with plenty of laughs along the way.

The original Rush Hour had surprised everyone with its phenomenal success when it was released in 1998. No one had been more shocked than Jackie Chan. He had already been a megastar in Hong Kong for years, but the same level of fame with American audiences had always eluded him. When Rush Hour exploded, Chan had all but given up on trying to be a star in America and was ready to head back to Hong Kong permanently. With Rush Hour earning over $141 million at the box office, practically overnight, everything changed.

According to director Brett Ratner, plans for a sequel were being laid almost immediately following the release of the first film. "We wrote the last scene of the original," Ratner said in a 2001 interview, "hoping that we would be making a sequel one day."

The seed for the plot of Rush Hour 2 was planted early on while Brett Ratner and the cast were promoting the original in 1998. "Chris (Tucker) and I went to the premiere (of Rush Hour) in Hong Kong," Ratner told Entertainment Weekly in 2001, "and watching him interact hilariously with the people, and do his Michael Jackson imitations at karaoke bars-bingo...we would be walking down the street, and he'd be talking to people and no one would understand a word he was saying. They looked at him like he was crazy."

Many of the real-life comic situations that Tucker found himself in while visiting Hong Kong helped inspire parts of the sequel, which would revolve this time around Tucker's character being the fish out of water. The story was fleshed out over the next couple of years with Jeff Nathanson writing the screenplay. Nathanson had reportedly done some uncredited work on the script for the first Rush Hour (originally penned by Ross LaManna), and Ratner was impressed. According to Entertainment Weekly, the President of Production at New Line Cinema at the time, Toby Emmerich, also contributed to a polish of the screenplay, while the writing team of Raven Metzner and Stu Zicherman helped shape the sequel's flashy Las Vegas climax. Using Las Vegas as a location was a treat for Brett Ratner, who admittedly loved to roll the dice. "I always wanted to make a movie in Vegas," he said in 2001. "If I wasn't a filmmaker, I would be in the casino business."

The star power of both Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker increased significantly after the first Rush Hour, and their salaries for Rush Hour 2 proved it. To repeat their roles as Carter and Lee, Chris Tucker received $20 million (up from $3 million for the first one) and Jackie Chan received $15 million plus back end points (up from $5 million). Negotiating the giant jump in salaries alone took over a year to finalize. Once the film was set to roll, however, everyone was looking forward to it. "In the first movie," Chris Tucker said in 2001, "the two characters came from two different worlds and had to get to know each other. In this movie, we already know each other and it's already established, so we can have even more fun. Jackie and I were born to work together."

Roselyn Sanchez and Zhang Ziyi were added to the cast to fill the central female roles in Rush Hour 2. Ziyi's role as the beautiful but deadly Hu Li was originally written for a man. However, Ratner was so taken with the Chinese beauty after watching her remarkable performance in the Oscar®-winning Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) that he had the part re-written and expanded especially for her. The movie was Ziyi's first English speaking movie, though she could barely speak the language at the time. In fact, her character speaks only three words in the entire film. Despite this challenge, Ziyi was determined to make her mark, including doing most of her own stunts. "She only used a stunt double twice during filming," said Jackie Chan. "She really wants to learn new things and is always saying, 'I want to do it.' I tell her to trust me and then she does the stunt. She's so exciting and a wonderful actress."

Roselyn Sanchez, who plays sexy secret service agent Isabella Molina, was thrilled with her part in Rush Hour 2. It was a chance to play "a tough woman, someone who is intelligent, smart and can kick some ass. It's been great fun," she said in a 2001 interview.

Cameras rolled on Rush Hour 2 in December 2000. Though there was a script firmly in place, that wasn't going to stop Chan and Tucker from seizing every opportunity to add their own flourishes. "It wasn't the best script in the world," Tucker told Entertainment Weekly in 2001. "All we needed was a guideline, and me and Jackie were going to take it to the next level." Brett Ratner agreed. "Look," added Ratner, "we were writing as we went. That's just the kind of movie it is - all of us improvising."

Despite their onscreen chemistry, there were rumors of off-screen tension between the two stars, but it proved to be old news. While it was true that Chan and Tucker were as diametrically opposed as their movie characters, over time they managed to bond. "With this movie," said Chan in 2001, "we were becoming buddies. For part one I didn't really know him and I was hiding from him. When he came to talk to me I would just hide from him because I didn't know what he was saying and I had to respond...Slowly we would get to know each other on the promoting tours. In Japan, Hong Kong and Korea we stay (sic) together, we ate together, and became good friends. Now we are buddies."

For Jackie Chan, the second time around was better in more ways than one. In addition to a bigger payday and making friends with Chris Tucker, he was also much more involved in the filmmaking process with Rush Hour 2. "This time," Chan said, "I was creatively involved a lot. Everybody trusted me. Before the first one, they weren't so sure. But now, it's whatever I want." Like he did for the first Rush Hour, Chan helped coordinate many of the spectacular stunts and martial arts action sequences.

Rush Hour 2 opened big in the summer of 2001, doubling the opening weekend take of the first film. It went on to become one of the top five box office grossing films for the entire year.

Critical response to Rush Hour 2 was generally mixed, though most reviewers understood the film's mass appeal as sheer popcorn entertainment. "The money is flying in Rush Hour 2," said Variety, "and it goes above and beyond the much-publicized combined $35 million payday for co-stars Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker. The earnings from the blockbuster predecessor have been smartly plowed back into this superior sequel, which is the very model of the limber, transnational Hollywood action comedy." Rolling Stone said, "the film winds up being faster and funnier than the first time. Chan's acrobatic high jinks play strikingly off of Tucker's wiseass humor...John Lone glowers suavely as Ricky Tan, and Zhang Ziyi...sizzles as Hu Li, the cutest baddie in any summer film. For a sexy twist, add Roselyn Sanchez as Isabella Molina, a double agent who leaves both Lee and Tucker panting - for good reason."

The teaming of Chris Tucker, Jackie Chan and Brett Ratner was gold all over again for Rush Hour 2. "My personality is in the movie," said Brett Ratner in 2001. "My humor, my personality. The directors I admire, like the Cohen brothers or Scorsese, when you see their films, you see them. If you knew me better, you would say, 'That's Brett. That's a Brett film.'"

Watch for surprise cameos from Don Cheadle as a police informant in a Chinese restaurant and Jeremy Piven as a flamboyant salesman in a Las Vegas Versace boutique.

Rush Hour 2 was followed by Rush Hour 3 in 2007.

Producers: Roger Birnbaum, Jonathan Glickman, Arthur Sarkissian, Jay Stern
Director: Brett Ratner
Screenplay: Jeff Nathanson, Ross LaManna (characters)
Cinematography: Matthew F. Leonetti
Art Direction: Andrew Max Cahn, Second Chan, William Cruse, James E. Tocci
Music: Ira Hearshen, Nile Rodgers, Lalo Schifrin
Film Editing: Mark Helfrich, Robert K. Lambert
Cast: Jackie Chan (Chief Inspector Lee), Chris Tucker (Detective James Carter), John Lone (Ricky Tan), Zhang Ziyi (Hu Li), Roselyn Sanchez (Isabella Molina), Harris Yulin (Agent Sterling), Alan King (Steven Reign), Kenneth Tsang (Captain Chin)
C-90m. Letterboxed.

by Andrea Passafiume
Rush Hour 2

Rush Hour 2

The hilariously mismatched cross-cultural odd couple of Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker team up for the second time in Brett Ratner's action comedy Rush Hour 2 (2001). In this sequel to 1998's box office smash Rush Hour, Detective James Carter (Tucker) and Chief Inspector Lee (Chan) find themselves foregoing a much needed vacation after there is a bombing at the American Embassy in Hong Kong. When the duo investigates, it looks like powerful gangster Ricky Tan (John Lone) may hold the key to some criminal activity in the Hong Kong underworld. As the plot thickens, a dangerous femme fatale (Zhang Ziyi), a shady businessman (Alan King) and a gorgeous secret service agent (Roselyn Sanchez) all add to the mix of colorful characters. The non-stop action moves from China, to Los Angeles, and on to Las Vegas for an exciting climax, with plenty of laughs along the way. The original Rush Hour had surprised everyone with its phenomenal success when it was released in 1998. No one had been more shocked than Jackie Chan. He had already been a megastar in Hong Kong for years, but the same level of fame with American audiences had always eluded him. When Rush Hour exploded, Chan had all but given up on trying to be a star in America and was ready to head back to Hong Kong permanently. With Rush Hour earning over $141 million at the box office, practically overnight, everything changed. According to director Brett Ratner, plans for a sequel were being laid almost immediately following the release of the first film. "We wrote the last scene of the original," Ratner said in a 2001 interview, "hoping that we would be making a sequel one day." The seed for the plot of Rush Hour 2 was planted early on while Brett Ratner and the cast were promoting the original in 1998. "Chris (Tucker) and I went to the premiere (of Rush Hour) in Hong Kong," Ratner told Entertainment Weekly in 2001, "and watching him interact hilariously with the people, and do his Michael Jackson imitations at karaoke bars-bingo...we would be walking down the street, and he'd be talking to people and no one would understand a word he was saying. They looked at him like he was crazy." Many of the real-life comic situations that Tucker found himself in while visiting Hong Kong helped inspire parts of the sequel, which would revolve this time around Tucker's character being the fish out of water. The story was fleshed out over the next couple of years with Jeff Nathanson writing the screenplay. Nathanson had reportedly done some uncredited work on the script for the first Rush Hour (originally penned by Ross LaManna), and Ratner was impressed. According to Entertainment Weekly, the President of Production at New Line Cinema at the time, Toby Emmerich, also contributed to a polish of the screenplay, while the writing team of Raven Metzner and Stu Zicherman helped shape the sequel's flashy Las Vegas climax. Using Las Vegas as a location was a treat for Brett Ratner, who admittedly loved to roll the dice. "I always wanted to make a movie in Vegas," he said in 2001. "If I wasn't a filmmaker, I would be in the casino business." The star power of both Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker increased significantly after the first Rush Hour, and their salaries for Rush Hour 2 proved it. To repeat their roles as Carter and Lee, Chris Tucker received $20 million (up from $3 million for the first one) and Jackie Chan received $15 million plus back end points (up from $5 million). Negotiating the giant jump in salaries alone took over a year to finalize. Once the film was set to roll, however, everyone was looking forward to it. "In the first movie," Chris Tucker said in 2001, "the two characters came from two different worlds and had to get to know each other. In this movie, we already know each other and it's already established, so we can have even more fun. Jackie and I were born to work together." Roselyn Sanchez and Zhang Ziyi were added to the cast to fill the central female roles in Rush Hour 2. Ziyi's role as the beautiful but deadly Hu Li was originally written for a man. However, Ratner was so taken with the Chinese beauty after watching her remarkable performance in the Oscar®-winning Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) that he had the part re-written and expanded especially for her. The movie was Ziyi's first English speaking movie, though she could barely speak the language at the time. In fact, her character speaks only three words in the entire film. Despite this challenge, Ziyi was determined to make her mark, including doing most of her own stunts. "She only used a stunt double twice during filming," said Jackie Chan. "She really wants to learn new things and is always saying, 'I want to do it.' I tell her to trust me and then she does the stunt. She's so exciting and a wonderful actress." Roselyn Sanchez, who plays sexy secret service agent Isabella Molina, was thrilled with her part in Rush Hour 2. It was a chance to play "a tough woman, someone who is intelligent, smart and can kick some ass. It's been great fun," she said in a 2001 interview. Cameras rolled on Rush Hour 2 in December 2000. Though there was a script firmly in place, that wasn't going to stop Chan and Tucker from seizing every opportunity to add their own flourishes. "It wasn't the best script in the world," Tucker told Entertainment Weekly in 2001. "All we needed was a guideline, and me and Jackie were going to take it to the next level." Brett Ratner agreed. "Look," added Ratner, "we were writing as we went. That's just the kind of movie it is - all of us improvising." Despite their onscreen chemistry, there were rumors of off-screen tension between the two stars, but it proved to be old news. While it was true that Chan and Tucker were as diametrically opposed as their movie characters, over time they managed to bond. "With this movie," said Chan in 2001, "we were becoming buddies. For part one I didn't really know him and I was hiding from him. When he came to talk to me I would just hide from him because I didn't know what he was saying and I had to respond...Slowly we would get to know each other on the promoting tours. In Japan, Hong Kong and Korea we stay (sic) together, we ate together, and became good friends. Now we are buddies." For Jackie Chan, the second time around was better in more ways than one. In addition to a bigger payday and making friends with Chris Tucker, he was also much more involved in the filmmaking process with Rush Hour 2. "This time," Chan said, "I was creatively involved a lot. Everybody trusted me. Before the first one, they weren't so sure. But now, it's whatever I want." Like he did for the first Rush Hour, Chan helped coordinate many of the spectacular stunts and martial arts action sequences. Rush Hour 2 opened big in the summer of 2001, doubling the opening weekend take of the first film. It went on to become one of the top five box office grossing films for the entire year. Critical response to Rush Hour 2 was generally mixed, though most reviewers understood the film's mass appeal as sheer popcorn entertainment. "The money is flying in Rush Hour 2," said Variety, "and it goes above and beyond the much-publicized combined $35 million payday for co-stars Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker. The earnings from the blockbuster predecessor have been smartly plowed back into this superior sequel, which is the very model of the limber, transnational Hollywood action comedy." Rolling Stone said, "the film winds up being faster and funnier than the first time. Chan's acrobatic high jinks play strikingly off of Tucker's wiseass humor...John Lone glowers suavely as Ricky Tan, and Zhang Ziyi...sizzles as Hu Li, the cutest baddie in any summer film. For a sexy twist, add Roselyn Sanchez as Isabella Molina, a double agent who leaves both Lee and Tucker panting - for good reason." The teaming of Chris Tucker, Jackie Chan and Brett Ratner was gold all over again for Rush Hour 2. "My personality is in the movie," said Brett Ratner in 2001. "My humor, my personality. The directors I admire, like the Cohen brothers or Scorsese, when you see their films, you see them. If you knew me better, you would say, 'That's Brett. That's a Brett film.'" Watch for surprise cameos from Don Cheadle as a police informant in a Chinese restaurant and Jeremy Piven as a flamboyant salesman in a Las Vegas Versace boutique. Rush Hour 2 was followed by Rush Hour 3 in 2007. Producers: Roger Birnbaum, Jonathan Glickman, Arthur Sarkissian, Jay Stern Director: Brett Ratner Screenplay: Jeff Nathanson, Ross LaManna (characters) Cinematography: Matthew F. Leonetti Art Direction: Andrew Max Cahn, Second Chan, William Cruse, James E. Tocci Music: Ira Hearshen, Nile Rodgers, Lalo Schifrin Film Editing: Mark Helfrich, Robert K. Lambert Cast: Jackie Chan (Chief Inspector Lee), Chris Tucker (Detective James Carter), John Lone (Ricky Tan), Zhang Ziyi (Hu Li), Roselyn Sanchez (Isabella Molina), Harris Yulin (Agent Sterling), Alan King (Steven Reign), Kenneth Tsang (Captain Chin) C-90m. Letterboxed. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer August 3, 2001

Released in United States on Video December 11, 2001

Released in United States February 2001

Released in United States August 2001

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 21-28, 2001.

Shown at Urbanworld Film Festival in New York City August 1-5, 2001.

Sequel to the blockbuster comedy "Rush Hour" (United States/1998), directed by Brett Ratner and starring Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker.

Jackie Chan reportedly received $15,000,000 to reprise his role as Detective Inspector Lee.

Chris Tucker (CST) reportedly received $20,000,000 to reprise his role as Detective James Carter.

Brett Ratner reportedly received $5,000,000 to direct.

Jackie Chan reportedly received $15,000,000 to reprise his role as Detective Inspector Lee.

Chris Tucker (CST) reportedly received $20,000,000 to reprise his role as Detective James Carter.

Brett Ratner reportedly received $5,000,000 to direct.

Completed shooting April 30, 2001.

Began shooting December 11, 2000.

Spyglass Entertainment was formerly Caravan Pictures.

aspect ratio 2.35:1

Released in United States Summer August 3, 2001

Released in United States on Video December 11, 2001

Released in United States February 2001 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica, California February 21-28, 2001.)

Released in United States August 2001 (Shown at Urbanworld Film Festival in New York City August 1-5, 2001.)