A Simple Wish


1h 29m 1997

Brief Synopsis

Anabel Greening is the daughter of a Broadway actor who is threatening to move the family to Nebraska if he does not receive a part in a new musical. When a "fairy godmother" - actually an absent-minded man - attempts to grant Anabel her wish to stay in New York, he accidentally leaves his wand beh

Film Details

Also Known As
Simple Wish
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Family
Fantasy
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m

Synopsis

Anabel Greening is the daughter of a Broadway actor who is threatening to move the family to Nebraska if he does not receive a part in a new musical. When a "fairy godmother" - actually an absent-minded man - attempts to grant Anabel her wish to stay in New York, he accidentally leaves his wand behind, creating a battle between the "ex-communicated evil fairies lead by Claudia who wish to steal all the magic wands and the good fairies who want to make sure the world remains a place where a simple wish can come true.

Crew

Lloyd Adams

Stunts

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunt Coordinator

Chris Alexander

Camera Assistant

Marsha L Alexander

Assistant

Scott Alexander

Production Assistant

Bill Anagnos

Stunts

Rick Anderson

Visual Effects

Andrei Anson

Location Assistant

Orlando Aquino

Other

Margie Arnott

Art Department Coordinator

Myles Aronowitz

Photography

Joseph Badalucco

Property Master

Nina Bafaro

Animator

Larry Bafia

Animator

Barry Barber

Driver

Ken Barbet

Driver

Gail Barringer

Accountant

Ben Barron

Graphics

Craig Barron

Visual Effects Supervisor

James Bartolomeo

Assistant Camera Operator

Eyde Belasco

Casting Associate

Dan Belley

Stunts

Tom Benz

Unit Production Manager

Paul F Bernard

Assistant Director

Martin Bernstein

Construction Coordinator

Matt Birman

Stunts

Tom Bisogno

Chief Modelmaker

Roland Blancaflor

Other

Steve Blevins

Visual Effects

Ralf D Bode

Director Of Photography

Clifford Bohm

Animator

Mark Boley

Hair

Vito Botticella

Carpenter

Karen Boyd

Assistant

Mary-anne Boyles

Stunts

Bernie Branston

Gaffer

Julian Bratolyubov

Music

Wendy Brennan

Assistant

J. C. Brotherhood

Special Effects

Bruce Broughton

Music Arranger

Bruce Broughton

Music

Michael Buck

Dolly Grip

Lorenzo Spirit Buffalo

Assistant Camera Operator

Keith Bunting

Best Boy Grip

Cori Burchell

Wardrobe

Ricky Burkhardt

Driver

Rick Butler

Art Director

Linda J Caldwell

Visual Effects

Kymbra Callaghan

Makeup Artist

Danielle Cambridge

Effects Assistant

Brian Campbell

Unit Production Manager

Duncan Campbell

Carpenter

Tim Campbell

Assistant

Rick Canelli

Adr

Greg Cannom

Makeup

Tamara Carlson-woodard

Other

Doug Caron

Assistant Editor

Andrew Casey

Steadicam Operator

Rob Cavaleri

Animator

John Cenatiempo

Stunts

T C Chapman

Best Boy

Susan Chernus

Assistant Editor

Jonathan Chibnall

Assistant Editor

Andy Chmura

Camera Operator

Richard Chuang

Visual Effects Supervisor

Peter Clark

Key Grip

Ross Clydesdale

Casting

John Cocks

Driver

Rachel Cohen

Animator

Alex Cohn

Location Manager

Rhett Collier

Animator

Judi Cooper-sealy

Hair Stylist

Pete Corby

Stunts

Hillary Covey

2-D Artist

Carolyn Cox

Assistant Camera Operator

Chanda Cummings

Animator

Sean Curran

Animator

Michael Curry

Foreman

Susanna David

Script Supervisor

Bill Davidson

Stunts

Michael Defeo

Chief Modelmaker

Krystyna Demkowicz

Visual Effects

Stracy Diaz

Stunts

Jaro Dick

Set Decorator

Angelo Digiacomo

Assistant Camera Operator

Graham Docherty

Wardrobe

Lori T Doherty

Script Supervisor

James P. Dolan

Gaffer

John P. Dolan

Key Grip

Robert Dolan

Rigging Gaffer

Tom Dolan

Best Boy

Vince Donato

Carpenter

Jill Donnerstag

Assistant

Doug Dooley

Animator

John Dorst

Video

Konrad Dunton

Graphics

Donna Dupere-taylor

Extras Agent/Coordinator

A R Duppin

Stunts

James W Edwards

Song

Sam Edwards

Visual Effects

Carol Eilenberg

Assistant

Gordon Eldridge

Electrician

Tony Eldridge

Electrician

Roy Elliston

Key Rigging Grip

Peter Epstein

Stunts

David Esneault

Animator

Christopher Evans

Visual Effects

David Farmer

Sound Editor

Errol G. Farquharson

Stunts

Sylvia Fay

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Ted Fay

2-D Artist

Carl Feaster

Song

Claude Feaster

Song

Michael Ferdie

Assistant Sound Editor

Anne-marie Ferney

Props

Steve Ferrier

Gaffer

C J Fidler

Stunts

Gail Filman

Wardrobe Supervisor

Gary Flanagan

Driver

Cindy Flowers

Wardrobe

John J Flugel

On-Set Dresser

Carrie Beth Foresman

Assistant Editor

Jay Fortune

Gaffer

Richard Friedlander

Assistant Editor

Lisa Frucht

Wardrobe Supervisor

Elizabeth Fulcher

Stunts

Alex Fulton

Assistant Location Manager

John Fundus

Boom Operator

Paul Gaily

On-Set Dresser

David Gainey

Animator

Joseph E Gallagher

Steadicam Operator

Tim Gallin

Stunts

Douglas Ganton

Sound Mixer

Joseph Garzero

Scenic Artist

John Gaskin

Production Accountant

Ed Gavin

Animator

Tim Gedemer

Sound Editor

Adam Geiger

Office Assistant

Larry Geiger

Best Boy Grip

Lisa Giambarberee

Assistant

Nicholas J Giangiulio

Stunts

Daniel Gibson

Special Effects Assistant

Gerri Gillan

Tailor

Jill Girling

Assistant Director

Michael S Glick

Unit Production Manager

Michael S Glick

Coproducer

Laney Gradus

Production Manager

Marilyn Graf

Foley Editor

Rebecca Gray

Accounting Assistant

Caroleen Green

Miniatures

Patricia Green

Makeup Artist

David Grimaldi

Sound Editor

Peter Grundy

Art Director

Bob Haak

Driver

Dick Hadsell

Researcher

Bill Hagan

Transportation Captain

Gregory G. Hale

Assistant Director

Robert Hannah

Stunts

Kristi Hansen

Animator

Richard A Harrison

Music Editor

Douglas C Hart

Assistant Camera Operator

Dorene Haver

Graphics Coordinator

Tim Healey

Visual Effects

Jason Heapy

Line Producer

Jeff Heintzman

Grip

Jacob Hendrickson

Art Assistant

Stephen Hendrickson

Production Designer

Patricia Doherty Hess

Unit Production Manager

Phil Hetos

Color Timer

Jery Hewitt

Stunts

Sammy Heyward

Song

Kristi Higgins

Animator

Paul Hiscock

Production Assistant

Hilda Hodges

Foley Artist

David Hoehn

Other

William Hooper

Sound Editor

F Howard

Carpenter

Barry Isenor

Assistant Art Director

Celine Jackson

Other

Craig Jackson

Production Assistant

Lindsay Jamieson Gallagher

Camera Assistant

Delroy P. Jarrett

Electrician

Jeffrey K Joe

Animator

Lara Johnston

Assistant Editor

Amy Jupiter

Executive Producer

Irene Kassow

Assistant Editor

James Keyes

Song

Aram Khachaturian

Song

Luke Khanlian

Other

Inge Klaudi

Makeup Artist

Danny Klepper

Transportation Captain

Hilmar Koch

Digital Effects Supervisor

Joyce Korbin

Stunts

Isabelle Kostic-crosley

Location Assistant

George Kraychyk

Photography

Judy Kriger

Animator

Beth Kushnick

Set Decorator

Jennifer Lamb

Stunts

Gregg Landaker

Rerecording

Stewart F Lane

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
Simple Wish
MPAA Rating
PG
Genre
Comedy
Family
Fantasy
Release Date
1997
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures
Location
Toronto, Ontario, Canada; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 29m

Articles

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie


Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots.

ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001
Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Tcm Remembers - Michael Ritchie

TCM Remembers - Michael Ritchie

Director Michael Ritchie died April 16th at the age of 62. A Wisconsin native, Ritchie studied at Harvard before succumbing to the attractions of the theatre. He started working in television during the 1960s where he directed episodes of The Big Valley and The Man from UNCLE among others. He moved into feature films with Downhill Racer (1969) at star Robert Redford's invitation and later directed Redford again in The Candidate (1972). The latter is a classic look at American political life that hasn't lost any of its power or insights over the years. This was the start of Ritchie's most productive period when he made several films that were both popular and critically acclaimed. You can find his sly wit and sense of critical drama in Smile (1975), The Bad News Bears (1976) and Semi-Tough (1978). By the 1980s, though, Ritchie's films focused less on social criticism and more on stars. The Survivors (1983) with Robin Williams remains under-rated but Ritchie-directed vehicles for Eddie Murphy (1986's The Golden Child), Bette Midler (1980's Divine Madness) and Chevy Chase (two Fletch films) didn't quite achieve their potential. Some of the old Ritchie spark and intelligence appeared in the made-for-cable The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom (1993) which earned him a Directors Guild Award. One of his final films was the long-awaited screen adaptation of The Fantasticks (1995) which partly brought Ritchie back to his theatrical roots. ANN SOTHERN: 1909 - 2001 Actress Ann Sothern passed away on March 15th at the age of 89. Her film career spanned sixty years and included a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for The Whales of August (1987) and several Emmy nominations for her roles in the TV shows Private Secretary (1953) and The Ann Sothern Show (1958). Sothern was born as Harriette Lake in North Dakota. She made her first film appearance in 1927 in small roles (so small, in fact, that some sources omit any films before 1929) before deciding to work on Broadway instead. Shortly afterwards she signed with Columbia Pictures where studio head Harry Cohn insisted she change her name because there were already too many actors with the last name of Lake. So "Ann" came from her mother's name Annette and "Sothern" from Shakespearean actor E.H. Sothern. For most of the 1930s she appeared in light comedies working with Eddie Cantor, Maurice Chevalier, Mickey Rooney and Fredric March. However, it wasn't until she switched to MGM (after a brief period with RKO) and made the film Maisie (1939) that Sothern hit pay dirt. It proved enormously popular and led to a series of nine more films through 1947 when she moved into dramas and musicals. During the 50s, Sothern made a mark with her TV series but returned to mostly second tier movies in the 1960s and 1970s. Finally she earned an Oscar nomination for her work in 1987's The Whales of August (in which, incidentally, her daughter Tisha Sterling played her at an earlier age). Turner Classic Movies plans to host a retrospective film tribute to her in July. Check back for details in June.

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)


Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49.

Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums.

In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons.

After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter.

by Michael T. Toole

Robert Pastorelli (1954-2004)

Robert Pastorelli, the rough and ready actor best known to television viewers for his portrayal of the devilish but lovable house painter Eldin on the long-running CBS comedy Murphy Brown (1988-97), was found dead on March 8 in his Hollywood Hills home. Authorities believe the cause of death was a drug overdose. He was 49. Born on June 21, 1954 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, Pastorelli had dreams of becoming a boxer, but when he was just 19, he was involved in a near fatal car accident that forced him to choose another career. By the late '70s, he chose acting. After doing some theater in New York, Pastorelli found work on both television: Barney Miller, Cagney & Lacey, Hill Street Blues; and film: Outrageous Fortune, Beverly Hills Cop II (both 1987), where his beefy frame and Runyonesque demeanor almost always had him play thugs and hoodlums. In 1988, he found fame when he was cast opposite Candice Bergen as Eldin, the house painter who could never quite finish the job in Murphy Brown. Pastorelli's likable raffishness countered well with Bergen's icy charms, and he stayed on for six seasons. After Murphy Brown, Pastorelli continued to play variations of the streetwise character, but this time to considerable comic effect in films like: Sister Act 2 (1994), Eraser, and Michael (both 1996). He returned to television impressively when he starred in the short-lived, but critically lauded Americanized version of the British Television hit Cracker. Pastorelli had just completed work on the Get Shorty (1995) sequel Be Cool with John Travolta, which is scheduled for release later this year. He is survived by a daughter. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Summer July 11, 1997

Released in United States on Video December 16, 1997

Completed shooting October 26, 1996.

Began shooting July 22, 1996.

The Bubble Factory is the production company of Sid Sheinberg and his sons, Bill and Jon.

Released in United States Summer July 11, 1997

Released in United States on Video December 16, 1997