Saving Private Ryan


2h 50m 1998
Saving Private Ryan

Brief Synopsis

A special detachment fights through war-torn Europe to find a man whose brothers have all died in combat.

Film Details

Also Known As
Der Soldat James Ryan, Il faut sauver le soldat Ryan, Rädda menige Ryan, Salvar al soldado Ryan, Soldat James Ryan, faut sauver le soldat Ryan
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
War
Period
Release Date
1998
Production Company
David Motta
Distribution Company
AMBLIN PARTNERS
Location
County Wexford, Ireland; Hatfield, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 50m

Synopsis

James Ryan, who has parachuted into France during the Allied invasion of Europe, has just lost three brothers in combat. Government policy dictates that he should return home lest his family be deprived of all its male offspring. A team of soldiers, led by Captain John Miller and fresh from the beaches of Normandy, is assembled to find and save Private Ryan.

Crew

Sharon Aiken

Assistant

Colin Anderson

Other

Terry Apsey

Construction Coordinator

Alan Armsby

Other

Lori Arnold

Production Coordinator

Carl Assmus

Other

Derek Atherton

Assistant

Simon Atherton

Other

Trang Bach

Other

Norman Baker

Other

Garret Baldwin

Electrician

Michael Barlett

Special Effects

Rupert Barnes

Other

John Barnett

Advisor

Christopher Barrick

Other

Ciaran Barry

Assistant Camera Operator

Bradley Barton

Special Effects

Colin Bates

Other

Bryan Baverstock

Transportation Captain

Clive Beard

Digital Effects Supervisor

Kathleen Beeler

Cgi Artist

Fiona Belton

Costumes

Andy Bennett

Stunts

Dan Bennett

Special Effects

Gary Birmingham

Driver

Anthony Black

Wardrobe

Peter Black

Other

Cath Blackett

Other

Marek Bojsza

Electrician

Sara Bolder

Dialogue Editor

Alan Booth

Carpenter

Steve Borthwick

Special Effects

Caimin Bourne

Special Effects

Clodagh Bowers

Assistant Production Coordinator

Nigel Boyd

Costumes

Joanna Branch

Art Assistant

Stuart Bray

Art Department

Stephen Bream

Other

Christopher Brennan

Special Effects

Robert Brian

Other

David Brighton

Visual Effects

Dan Britton

Other

Kim Bromley

Visual Effects

Stephen Brown

Props

Tom Brown

Art Director

Ian Bryce

Producer

Alex Burdett

Special Effects

Jane Burgess

Production Assistant

Simon Burgess

Assistant Location Manager

Gary Burritt

Negative Cutting

Elaine Burt

Production Coordinator

Lois Burwell

Makeup Artist

Maeve Butler

Production Assistant

Richard Byard

Assistant Editor

Chris Byrne

Other

Pavel Cajzl

Stunts

Marc Cass

Stunts

Steve Caswell

Stunts

Paul Catling

Art Department

Viktor Cervenka

Stunts

Denise Chamian

Casting

Lisa Chino

Sound

Freddie Chiverton

Driver

Terry Chostner

Cgi Artist

Philip Clark

Special Effects

Stuart Clarke

Stunts

Tania Clarke

Assistant Production Coordinator

Jeff Clifford

Special Effects

James Cloney

Assistant Location Manager

Simon Cockren

Special Effects

Matt Codd

Visual Effects

John Coleman

Driver

Matt Colleran

Other

Aron Collins

Other

Aris Comninos

Stunts

Stuart Conran

Art Department

Caitlin Content

Art Department

Henri Contet

Song

Hillery Cope

Construction

Cliff Corbould

Special Effects

Ian Corbould

Special Effects

Neil Corbould

Special Effects Supervisor

Paul Corbould

Visual Effects

Seamus Corcoran

Camera Operator

Robert Cowper

Other

Terry Cox

Special Effects

Simon Cozens

Assistant Editor

Lee Craik

Other

Laurie Crane

Stunts

Patrick Crane

Assistant Editor

Simon Crane

Stunt Coordinator

David Crossman

Costumes

Allan B Croucher

Other

Mike Cuevas

Post-Production Assistant

Chris Cullum

Other

Daisy Cummins

Assistant Director

Mike Curran

Special Effects

Aileen Curtin

Production Assistant

Bonnie Curtis

Coproducer

Frank Darabont

Screenplay

Sophie Dasic

Assistant Production Accountant

Kathleen Davidson

Production

Robin Davies

Other

Stephen Dawson

Other

Sandy De Crescent

Consultant

Kevin De La Noy

Associate Producer

Eddie De Lange

Song

Ray De-haan

Stunts

Lisa Dean

Set Decorator

David Deane

Other

Cian Debutlear

Camera Operator

Michael Deegan

Construction Manager

Gerry Delaney

Production

Berny Demolski

Other

Maria Devane

Post-Production Accountant

Patrick Devereux

Other

David Devlin

Lighting Technician

Lindy Diamond

Effects Coordinator

Stuart Digby

Special Effects

Paul Dimmer

Special Effects

Rob Doherty

Other

Noel Donellon

Video Assist/Playback

Daniel T. Dorrance

Art Director

Jim Dowhall

Stunts

Dean Drabin

Adr Mixer

William Draper

Props

Lisa Drayne

Production Assistant

Mitch Dubin

Camera Operator

Catherine Dunne

Assistant Director

Tommy Dunne

Assistant

Mike Durkan

Special Effects

Dale Dye

Advisor

Polly Earnshaw

Makeup

Tony Eckert

Foley Mixer

Teresa Eckton

Editor

Peter Edmonds

Costumes

Cos Egan

Props

Duke Ellington

Song

Rosalyn Ellis

Other

Dan Engstrom

Effects Assistant

Gonzalo Escudero

Cgi Artist

Frank Eulner

Editor

David Evans

Other

John Evans

Visual Effects

Ricky Eyres

Art Director

Sheila Fahey

Costume Supervisor

Sven E M Fahlgren

Post-Production Coordinator

Stefen Fangmeier

Visual Effects Supervisor

Mike Faulkner

Driver

Martha Fein

Other

Andre Fenley

Sound

Raymond Ferguson

Special Effects

Carlos Fidel

Production Assistant

Neil Finnighan

Stunts

Ann-marie Fitzgerald

Assistant Production Accountant

Tim Flattery

Visual Effects

John Flemming

Key Grip

Veronique Fletcher

Assistant Set Dresser

Robert Foley

Other

Johnny Fontana

Special Effects

Dave Forster

Other

John Fox

Props

Andrew France

Other

Sarah J Francis

Video Assist/Playback

Scott Frank

Screenplay (Uncredited)

Scott Frank

Other

Erica Frauman

Post-Production Supervisor

Gary Freeman

Art Director

Jeanette Freeman

Hair Stylist

Joanne Frye

Other

Marc Fusco

Assistant

Katie Gabriel

Special Effects Assistant

George Gambetta

Other

Alex Garcia

Assistant Editor

Andy Garder

Art Department

Barry Gates

Props

John Gear

Other

Joseph Geday

Special Effects

Tim Geideman

Other

Colin Gibbs

Welder

Donal Gilligan

Assistant Camera Operator

Alex Gladstone

Location Manager

Lavinia Glynn-jones

Art Department Coordinator

Philip Goldsworthy

Stunts

Jennifer Gonzalez

Production

Adam Goodman

Assistant Director

Bridget Goodman

Cgi Artist

Mark R. Gordon

Producer

Melanie Gore Grimes

Location Manager

Neill Gorton

Visual Effects Designer

Barrie Gower

Other

Nina Graham

Other

Dale Grahn

Color Timer

Siobhan Grant

Other

Jonathan Greber

Visual Effects

Steve Griffin

Stunts

Sian Grigg

Makeup Artist

Kenny Groom

Assistant Camera Operator

Alan Grosch

Electrician

Darren Grosch

Electrician

Film Details

Also Known As
Der Soldat James Ryan, Il faut sauver le soldat Ryan, Rädda menige Ryan, Salvar al soldado Ryan, Soldat James Ryan, faut sauver le soldat Ryan
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
War
Period
Release Date
1998
Production Company
David Motta
Distribution Company
AMBLIN PARTNERS
Location
County Wexford, Ireland; Hatfield, England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 50m

Award Wins

Best Cinematography

1998
Janusz Kaminski

Best Cinematography

1998

Best Director

1998
Steven Spielberg

Best Director

1998
Steven Spielberg

Best Editing

1998

Best Film Editing

1998
Michael Kahn

Best Sound

1998
Ronald Judkins

Best Sound

1998
Gary Rydstrom

Best Sound

1998
Andy Nelson

Best Sound

1998
Gary Summers

Best Sound

1998

Best Sound Effects Sound Editing

1998
Gary Rydstrom

Best Sound Effects Sound Editing

1998
Richard Hymns

Best Sound Effects Sound Editing

1998

Award Nominations

Best Actor

1998
Tom Hanks

Set Decoration

1998

Best Makeup

1998

Best Original Screenplay

1998

Best Picture

1998

Best Score (Dramatic Picture)

1998

Articles

Saving Private Ryan


After years of revisiting the national shame of Vietnam in the war films of the seventies and eighties, Steven Spielberg steered Hollywood back to the pride and accomplishment of "the greatest generation" with Saving Private Ryan (1998). It was the first major World War II film in decades and the timing was right. The 50th Anniversary of D-Day in 1994 brought the cultural conversation back to the sacrifice of American soldiers. The World War II histories by Stephen Ambrose (notably Band of Brothers and D-Day) were major non-fiction best-sellers. In addition, Tom Brokaw's book The Greatest Generation was released in 1998, the same year as Saving Private Ryan, signaling that America was once again ready to eulogize the good war.

"I've had an obsession with World War II," confessed Spielberg in an interview conducted during the production of the film. His father fought in the Burma campaign in World War II as a radio man in a fighter plane. As a young teen, Spielberg and his friends created World War II adventures on super 8 film. He'd previously touched on the war in such films as 1941 (a homefront comedy, 1979), Empire of the Sun (a child's-eye view of survival in an internment camp, 1987) and his acclaimed Holocaust drama Schindler's List [1993], but Saving Private Ryan was his first classical war film, a platoon drama about the experience of American soldiers in combat.

The script was inspired by a true story: the Niland family had lost three of their four sons to the war. The War Department, still remembering the five Sullivan brothers who all died while serving on the same battleship (which led to the policy of preventing siblings from serving together), was not going to let it happen again. They sent a platoon to pull the fourth Niland son out of harm's way; he was a young soldier who had parachuted in with the 101st on D-Day. Robert Rodat's script fictionalizes the particulars but draws upon real history to tell the story of the soldiers who land on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944. The real-life landing was a slaughter. The pre-invasion barrage had failed to knock out the dug-in German guns and heavily-entrenched soldiers on the hills above the beach and the Germans slaughtered the first wave of American soldiers.

Spielberg transformed the scene into the film's most visceral and memorable accomplishment: the shell-shock of the brutal, bloody, in-your-face chaos of American soldiers hitting the beach on D-Day. The unrelenting barrage of exploding shells and pelting gunfire on a beach littered with the bodies and limbs of American soldiers hits the audience like an assault on the senses. "I tried to be as brutally honest as I could with what I had," explained Spielberg. Bullets tear through air, water, flesh; men stagger about, lost and limbless; explosions shatter the dull scream of war; soldiers bleed, fall, and die, just so many bodies in the detritus of battle. Spielberg's razor-sharp images are charged with panic and his camera is almost too alert as it takes in the shocking information overload. War has never been portrayed as so intimidating, so terrifying, so arbitrarily destructive. It may be the closest Hollywood has ever come to recreating the combat experience, thanks in large part to Spielberg's brilliant orchestration of the chaos. The experience sent some veterans reeling into vivid flashbacks and stunning audiences into an awed, aghast, and humble silence.

Tom Hanks is quietly authoritative as Captain John Miller, whose platoon Ð Sgt. Horvath (Tom Sizemore), Privates Reiben (Edward Burns), Jackson (Barry Pepper), Mellish (Adam Goldberg), Caparzo (Vin Diesel) and Medic Wade (Giovanni Ribisi) Ð survives the harrowing landing and is given a new, unconventional mission: to head behind enemy lines to find and retrieve Private James Ryan (Matt Damon).

Hanks was a longtime friend of Spielberg but they had never worked together on a film before. Coming upon the same script independently, they discussed the possibilities and decided to collaborate. The collaboration was so successful, and the subject matter so compelling, that Spielberg and Hanks reteamed to produce the mini-series Band of Brothers (based on the book by Stephen Ambrose) for HBO. For the young soldiers in the platoon, Spielberg (who has always had a knack for discovering young talent) went looking for unfamiliar faces to inhabit characters that were at once familiar war movie types and individual personalities. Good Will Hunting [1997] had yet to elevate Matt Damon's star when he was cast as Ryan, a small but essential role in the film. Adam Goldberg was best known for his role in Dazed and Confused [1993], Giovanni Ribisi was a TV veteran who had played a small role in Tom Hanks' directorial debut That Thing You Do! [1996], Jeremy Davies was a talented actor in a few American Indie productions (Spanking the Monkey, 1994), and Barry Pepper and Vin Diesel were virtual unknowns when Spielberg cast them. You'll also see Paul Giamatti in a small role as an officer; the exposure gave his struggling career a major boost. To prepare his actors for their roles, Spielberg turned to war veteran turned war movie consultant Dale Dye, who acted as drill sergeant for a six-day boot camp and crash course in physical training, weapons training and military culture.

The Omaha Beach invasion was staged on the coast of Ireland. Vintage landing crafts were brought in from all over the world. Hundreds of members of the Irish Army were hired as extras and hundreds of guns were loaded with blanks for the actors and extras on the front lines of the film (the rest were issued rubber guns). The actors wore earplugs to protect them from the noise of the explosives and ordnance used to create the spectacle of the German assault on the landing. Computer effects were used to add background explosions and fill out long shots with more soldiers and chaos. For the film's other major location, a French village set, the company built their own village in a rural field in Hatfield, just North of London. They actually constructed real, functional buildings and then destroyed them to create an authentically war-scarred look.

Spielberg reteamed with Janusz Kaminski, his regular cinematographer since Schindler's List. "Very early on in the process, we both knew that we did not want this to look like a Technicolor extravaganza about World War II. We wanted it to look very much like color newsreel footage from the 1940s, which is highly desaturated and very grainy and extremely low tech." The camerawork was all handheld in the combat scenes, to evoke a quality of combat newsreel footage as well as the jittery immediacy of the action. Kaminski had special lenses made to defuse the image slightly and sent the negative to a lab to further leech the color out. "There's virtually not a single shot that shows a blue sky." The skip-frame effects, created in post-production, added a stuttery visual quality and added to the sense of adrenaline-charged immediacy.

Saving Private Ryan was one of Spielberg's most acclaimed films. "This film simply looks at war as if war had not been looked at before," wrote New York Times critic Janet Maslin, who described the film as "the ultimate devastating letter home." Roger Ebert declared: "Saving Private Ryan says things about war that are as complex and difficult as any essayist could possibly express, and does it with broad, strong images, with violence, with profanity, with action, with camaraderie." It earned five Academy Awards, including Spielberg's second Oscar® for Best Director and Janusz Kaminski's second award for Best Cinematography. It was nominated for eleven awards in all, including Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Actor (Tom Hanks) and remains one of the most celebrated films about the American soldier experience in World War II.

Producers: Ian Bryce, Mark Gordon, Gary Levinsohn, Steven Spielberg
Director: Steven Spielberg
Screenplay: Robert Rodat
Cinematography: Janusz Kaminski
Art Direction: Daniel T. Dorrance (supervising art director); Tom Brown, Ricky Eyres, Chris Seagers, Alan Tomkins; Mark Tanner (uncredited)
Music: John Williams
Film Editing: Michael Kahn
Cast: Tom Hanks (Capt. John H. Miller), Tom Sizemore (Sgt. Mike Horvath), Edward Burns (Pvt. Richard Reiben), Barry Pepper (Pvt. Daniel Jackson), Adam Goldberg (Pvt. Stanley Mellish), Vin Diesel (Pvt. Adrian Caparzo), Giovanni Ribisi (T-4 Medic Irwin Wade), Jeremy Davies (Cpl. Timothy P. Upham), Matt Damon (Pvt. James Francis Ryan), Ted Danson (Capt. Fred Hamill), Paul Giamatti (Sgt. Hill), Dennis Farina (Lt. Col. Anderson).
C-170m. Letterboxed.

by Sean Axmaker
Saving Private Ryan

Saving Private Ryan

After years of revisiting the national shame of Vietnam in the war films of the seventies and eighties, Steven Spielberg steered Hollywood back to the pride and accomplishment of "the greatest generation" with Saving Private Ryan (1998). It was the first major World War II film in decades and the timing was right. The 50th Anniversary of D-Day in 1994 brought the cultural conversation back to the sacrifice of American soldiers. The World War II histories by Stephen Ambrose (notably Band of Brothers and D-Day) were major non-fiction best-sellers. In addition, Tom Brokaw's book The Greatest Generation was released in 1998, the same year as Saving Private Ryan, signaling that America was once again ready to eulogize the good war. "I've had an obsession with World War II," confessed Spielberg in an interview conducted during the production of the film. His father fought in the Burma campaign in World War II as a radio man in a fighter plane. As a young teen, Spielberg and his friends created World War II adventures on super 8 film. He'd previously touched on the war in such films as 1941 (a homefront comedy, 1979), Empire of the Sun (a child's-eye view of survival in an internment camp, 1987) and his acclaimed Holocaust drama Schindler's List [1993], but Saving Private Ryan was his first classical war film, a platoon drama about the experience of American soldiers in combat. The script was inspired by a true story: the Niland family had lost three of their four sons to the war. The War Department, still remembering the five Sullivan brothers who all died while serving on the same battleship (which led to the policy of preventing siblings from serving together), was not going to let it happen again. They sent a platoon to pull the fourth Niland son out of harm's way; he was a young soldier who had parachuted in with the 101st on D-Day. Robert Rodat's script fictionalizes the particulars but draws upon real history to tell the story of the soldiers who land on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944. The real-life landing was a slaughter. The pre-invasion barrage had failed to knock out the dug-in German guns and heavily-entrenched soldiers on the hills above the beach and the Germans slaughtered the first wave of American soldiers. Spielberg transformed the scene into the film's most visceral and memorable accomplishment: the shell-shock of the brutal, bloody, in-your-face chaos of American soldiers hitting the beach on D-Day. The unrelenting barrage of exploding shells and pelting gunfire on a beach littered with the bodies and limbs of American soldiers hits the audience like an assault on the senses. "I tried to be as brutally honest as I could with what I had," explained Spielberg. Bullets tear through air, water, flesh; men stagger about, lost and limbless; explosions shatter the dull scream of war; soldiers bleed, fall, and die, just so many bodies in the detritus of battle. Spielberg's razor-sharp images are charged with panic and his camera is almost too alert as it takes in the shocking information overload. War has never been portrayed as so intimidating, so terrifying, so arbitrarily destructive. It may be the closest Hollywood has ever come to recreating the combat experience, thanks in large part to Spielberg's brilliant orchestration of the chaos. The experience sent some veterans reeling into vivid flashbacks and stunning audiences into an awed, aghast, and humble silence. Tom Hanks is quietly authoritative as Captain John Miller, whose platoon Ð Sgt. Horvath (Tom Sizemore), Privates Reiben (Edward Burns), Jackson (Barry Pepper), Mellish (Adam Goldberg), Caparzo (Vin Diesel) and Medic Wade (Giovanni Ribisi) Ð survives the harrowing landing and is given a new, unconventional mission: to head behind enemy lines to find and retrieve Private James Ryan (Matt Damon). Hanks was a longtime friend of Spielberg but they had never worked together on a film before. Coming upon the same script independently, they discussed the possibilities and decided to collaborate. The collaboration was so successful, and the subject matter so compelling, that Spielberg and Hanks reteamed to produce the mini-series Band of Brothers (based on the book by Stephen Ambrose) for HBO. For the young soldiers in the platoon, Spielberg (who has always had a knack for discovering young talent) went looking for unfamiliar faces to inhabit characters that were at once familiar war movie types and individual personalities. Good Will Hunting [1997] had yet to elevate Matt Damon's star when he was cast as Ryan, a small but essential role in the film. Adam Goldberg was best known for his role in Dazed and Confused [1993], Giovanni Ribisi was a TV veteran who had played a small role in Tom Hanks' directorial debut That Thing You Do! [1996], Jeremy Davies was a talented actor in a few American Indie productions (Spanking the Monkey, 1994), and Barry Pepper and Vin Diesel were virtual unknowns when Spielberg cast them. You'll also see Paul Giamatti in a small role as an officer; the exposure gave his struggling career a major boost. To prepare his actors for their roles, Spielberg turned to war veteran turned war movie consultant Dale Dye, who acted as drill sergeant for a six-day boot camp and crash course in physical training, weapons training and military culture. The Omaha Beach invasion was staged on the coast of Ireland. Vintage landing crafts were brought in from all over the world. Hundreds of members of the Irish Army were hired as extras and hundreds of guns were loaded with blanks for the actors and extras on the front lines of the film (the rest were issued rubber guns). The actors wore earplugs to protect them from the noise of the explosives and ordnance used to create the spectacle of the German assault on the landing. Computer effects were used to add background explosions and fill out long shots with more soldiers and chaos. For the film's other major location, a French village set, the company built their own village in a rural field in Hatfield, just North of London. They actually constructed real, functional buildings and then destroyed them to create an authentically war-scarred look. Spielberg reteamed with Janusz Kaminski, his regular cinematographer since Schindler's List. "Very early on in the process, we both knew that we did not want this to look like a Technicolor extravaganza about World War II. We wanted it to look very much like color newsreel footage from the 1940s, which is highly desaturated and very grainy and extremely low tech." The camerawork was all handheld in the combat scenes, to evoke a quality of combat newsreel footage as well as the jittery immediacy of the action. Kaminski had special lenses made to defuse the image slightly and sent the negative to a lab to further leech the color out. "There's virtually not a single shot that shows a blue sky." The skip-frame effects, created in post-production, added a stuttery visual quality and added to the sense of adrenaline-charged immediacy. Saving Private Ryan was one of Spielberg's most acclaimed films. "This film simply looks at war as if war had not been looked at before," wrote New York Times critic Janet Maslin, who described the film as "the ultimate devastating letter home." Roger Ebert declared: "Saving Private Ryan says things about war that are as complex and difficult as any essayist could possibly express, and does it with broad, strong images, with violence, with profanity, with action, with camaraderie." It earned five Academy Awards, including Spielberg's second Oscar® for Best Director and Janusz Kaminski's second award for Best Cinematography. It was nominated for eleven awards in all, including Best Picture, Best Screenplay and Best Actor (Tom Hanks) and remains one of the most celebrated films about the American soldier experience in World War II. Producers: Ian Bryce, Mark Gordon, Gary Levinsohn, Steven Spielberg Director: Steven Spielberg Screenplay: Robert Rodat Cinematography: Janusz Kaminski Art Direction: Daniel T. Dorrance (supervising art director); Tom Brown, Ricky Eyres, Chris Seagers, Alan Tomkins; Mark Tanner (uncredited) Music: John Williams Film Editing: Michael Kahn Cast: Tom Hanks (Capt. John H. Miller), Tom Sizemore (Sgt. Mike Horvath), Edward Burns (Pvt. Richard Reiben), Barry Pepper (Pvt. Daniel Jackson), Adam Goldberg (Pvt. Stanley Mellish), Vin Diesel (Pvt. Adrian Caparzo), Giovanni Ribisi (T-4 Medic Irwin Wade), Jeremy Davies (Cpl. Timothy P. Upham), Matt Damon (Pvt. James Francis Ryan), Ted Danson (Capt. Fred Hamill), Paul Giamatti (Sgt. Hill), Dennis Farina (Lt. Col. Anderson). C-170m. Letterboxed. by Sean Axmaker

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 1999 Golden Laurel Award for Best Motion Picture from the Producers Guild of America.

Nominated for the 1998 award for Best Screenplay Written Directly for the Screen (Robert Rodat) from the Writers Guild of America.

Steven Spielberg was nominated for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in 1998 by the Directors Guild of America.

Winner of five 1998 awards, including for Best Film, Best Ensemble, Best Director, Best Cinematography and Best Editing from the Online Film Critics Society.

Winner of the 1998 award for Best Cinematography from the Boston Society of Film Critcs.

Winner of the 1998 award for Best Film from the New York Film Critics Circle.

Winner of the 1998 award for Best Picture from the Chicago Critics Film Association. Nominated for a further three awards, including Best Director, Best Cinematography and Best Actor (Tom Hanks).

Winner of the 1998 Eddie Award for Best Edited Feature Film (Michael Kahn) from the American Cinema Editors.

Winner of the 1998 Golden Satellite Award for Outstanding Film Editing (Michael Kohn) from the International Press Academy.

Winner of three 1998 awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Cinematography from the Los Angeles Film Critics Association.

Winner of two 1998 Broadcast Film Critics Association awards, including Best Director (Steven Spielberg) and Best Score (John Williams). Nominated for the award for Best Picture.

Released in United States Summer July 24, 1998

Re-released in United States February 5, 1999

Released in United States on Video May 25, 1999

Released in United States 1998

Released in United States September 1998

Shown at Venice Film Festival (out of competition) August 26 - September 8, 1998.

Shown at Deauville Festival of American Film September 4-13, 1998.

Mutual Film co was previously known as Cloud Nine Entertainment.

Began shooting June 27, 1997.

Completed shooting September 13, 1997.

Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks reportedly took no money upfront but agreed to split 35% of gross receipts, which brought them as much as $50 million each.

Re-released in France March 17, 1999.

Released in United States Summer July 24, 1998

Re-released in United States February 5, 1999

Released in United States on Video May 25, 1999

Released in United States 1998 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (out of competition) August 26 - September 8, 1998.)

Released in United States 1998 (Film had its French premiere at the 1998 Deauville Festival of American Film.)

Released in United States September 1998 (Shown at Deauville Festival of American Film September 4-13, 1998.)

Winner of the 1999 Artios Award for Feature Film - Drama by the Casting Society of America (CSA).