Diabolique


1h 47m 1996

Brief Synopsis

Nicole and Mia are two very different women, but they have something in common. Both of them are sleeping with Guy Baran--and both of them are sick of his domination in their lives. Nicole is Guy's mistress. Sexy and self-assured, she was first drawn to Guy's magnetism--and then disgusted by his lies and selfishness. Mia is Guy's wife. A timid former nun with a weak heart, she is nearly suicidal over Guy's blatant infidelities, his constant cruel humiliation of her and his arrogant sexual demands. Then one day Nicole and Mia decide to free themselves from Guy's sadistic embrace once and for all. Nicole devises a murder scheme that seems foolproof, but in its aftermath Nicole and Mia each discover things about Guy--and about each other--that they'd never imagined. Then a brash, unconventional detective starts looking into Guy's disappearance. Finally, a terrifying series of clues begin to suggest that Guy may not be dead after all... and he may be coming back to deal with both of them.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m

Synopsis

Nicole and Mia are two very different women, but they have something in common. Both of them are sleeping with Guy Baran--and both of them are sick of his domination in their lives. Nicole is Guy's mistress. Sexy and self-assured, she was first drawn to Guy's magnetism--and then disgusted by his lies and selfishness. Mia is Guy's wife. A timid former nun with a weak heart, she is nearly suicidal over Guy's blatant infidelities, his constant cruel humiliation of her and his arrogant sexual demands. Then one day Nicole and Mia decide to free themselves from Guy's sadistic embrace once and for all. Nicole devises a murder scheme that seems foolproof, but in its aftermath Nicole and Mia each discover things about Guy--and about each other--that they'd never imagined. Then a brash, unconventional detective starts looking into Guy's disappearance. Finally, a terrifying series of clues begin to suggest that Guy may not be dead after all... and he may be coming back to deal with both of them.

Crew

Louis J Abeln

Other

Phil Abraham

Assistant Camera Operator

Robert W Adams

Key Grip

Elton Ahi

Sound

Danny Aiello Iii

Stunt Coordinator

Cynthia Albert

Wardrobe

Neils D Alpert

Assistant

Maria Arago

Assistant

Beth Armogida

Post-Production Assistant

Terry Arthur

Best Boy Grip

Bryan Ashford

Dolly Grip

Bob Baker

Other

Carmen Baker

Assistant Sound Editor

Natalie Baker

Dialogue Coach

Gary Barber

Executive Producer

Mark A Barill

Other

Trisha Barnhart

Accountant

Craig Barron

Visual Effects Supervisor

David W Beattie

Driver

Norman Beck

Carpenter

Jeff Becker

Best Boy

Donna Belajac

Casting

David A Belasco

Driver

Bill W Benton

Rerecording

Gerard D Berger

Other

Chuck Binder

Executive Producer

Carol Bjornestad

Assistant

Leah Blackwood

Other

Kathryn A Borland

Other

Vincent Borrelli

Other

Pierre Bouileau

Source Material (From Novel)

Linda Boykin-williams

Makeup Artist

David Boysen

Other

Dennis Bradford

Art Director

Lisa Bradley

Production Coordinator

Dennis J. Braun

Transportation Co-Captain

Jim Bridges

Photography

Jim Brookshire

Sound Editor

Keith Brzozowski

Carpenter

Patricia Buckley

Other

Joseph A Buda

Accountant

Sandra Budd

Other

Robert Buncher

Carpenter

Brenda Bush

Stand-In

John N Butler

On-Set Dresser

Brian Buzzelli

Grip

Christine Cantella

Wardrobe

Chris Carptenter

Rerecording

Ben Carter

Other

Roderick R Carter

Makeup Artist

Dan Casey

Assistant

Patrick Caulfield

Set Costumer

Harry Chalmers

Driver

Tim Chau

Sound Editor

Dennis S Cinkan

Production

Nora Cline

Other

Henri-georges Clouzot

Story By

Steve Cohagan

Rigging Gaffer

K.c. Colwell

Assistant Director

Craig Comstock

Set Production Assistant

Thomas A Corbett

Driver

Tangi Crawford

Costumes

Stephen Crowley

Electrician

Julie B Crum

Other

Rick Crumrine

Camera Trainee

Rick Crumrine

Camera

Meredith Cruse

Assistant

Billy Cude

Driver

Gary Daigler

Unit Production Manager

Gary Daigler

Coproducer

Pat Dames

Other

Stephen Lee Davis

Assistant Director

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Lisa Campbell Demaine

Assistant Production Coordinator

Krystyna Demkowicz

Production Manager

James M Desmone

Other

Leslie Dilley

Production Designer

Leslie Dilley

Technical Coordinator

Fred Donatelli

Other

Bill Donehue

Special Effects

Regis G Donehue

Grip

Elizabeth Dory

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Doyle

Special Effects Foreman

Susan Dudeck

Adr Editor

Sharon A Dulaney

Other

John Duncan

Visual Effects

Chip Eccles

Carpenter

Randy Edelman

Music Composer

Randy Edelman

Soloist

Randy Edelman

Music Conductor

Robert C Edgar

Assistant Production Coordinator

Gregory L Edwards

Grip

Ray Edwards

Grip

Edwin A Effrein

Assistant

Dennis Eger

Makeup Artist

Temujin Ekunfeo

Other

Jim Emswiller

Video

Donna Evans Merlo

Stunts

Robert Fernandez

Sound

Ralph Ferraro

Music Arranger

Carl D Filip

Carpenter

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Bart Flaherty

Grip

Melissa Resch Fleet

Assistant

Carmen Flores De Tanis

Adr

Jodi H Fonfa

Consultant

C Romania Ford

Makeup Artist

Bill Franko

On-Set Dresser

Eileen Garrigan

Other

Thomas Garrigan

Other

Albert Gasser

Sound Editor

Peter Gause

Stand-In

Craig B Glaser

Craft Service

Kurt Glaser

Craft Service

Susan Glod

Other

Avram D Gold

Adr Editor

Gail Goldberg

Casting Associate

Zoila Gomez

Production Coordinator

Walter Gorr

Carpenter

Timothy B Graham

Special Effects

Rich Green

Foley

Oda Groeschel

Costumes

Peter F Guase

Stunts

Brian Gunter

Gaffer

Craig Haagensen

Camera Operator

Sarah Hackett

Wardrobe

Kevin L Hanz

Other

Barbara Harris

Voice Casting

Kevin Harris

Special Effects Coordinator

Kimberly Harris

Adr Editor

Ben Harrison

Other

William J Hart

Driver

Jim Heastings

Carpenter

Rose Heeter

Stand-In

D. M. Hemphill

Rerecording

Mario Herrera

Other

Don J Hewitt

Stunts

Christian P Hoerger

Driver

Laurie A Hoover

Accountant

William Huemrich

Carpenter

Smith Harper Hutchings

Other

George J Jaber

Carpenter

Alan R Jacques

Projectionist

Alan R Jacques

Apprentice

Peter James

Director Of Photography

Joe Janusek

Key Rigging Grip

Lila Javan

Assistant

Nils C Jensen

Sound Editor

Marla Jonas

Other

Gregory Jones

On-Set Dresser

Deborah Kazsimer

Other

Dawn Keeser

Special Thanks To

C A Kelly

Sound

David Kern

Sound Editor

Nancy Keslar

Hair Stylist

Jordan Klein

Camera

Marion Kolsby

Assistant Art Director

Gary Kosko

Assistant Art Director

Don Kraus

Transportation Captain

Girard Kuehn

Driver

Lara Lampenfield

Other

John Lasalandra

Music Editor

Martin Lasowitz

Property Master

Linda Latore

Other

Michael Laudata

Hair Stylist

Michael Laudati

Makeup Artist

Scott T Leight

Grip

Jody Levin

Post-Production Supervisor

Mark L Levin

Assistant Editor

Dominique Levy

Assistant

Pamela Lewis

Other

Carol Littleton

Editor

Richard Lorenzana

Accountant

Susan M Lorenzana

Accounting Assistant

Dennis Maitland

Sound Mixer

Gene Makrancy

Other

Don Malouf

Sound Editor

John P Mangan

Driver

Joseph A Manni

Carpenter

Richard P Marchand

Other

Kristin Marshall

Driver

Kristin Marshall

Assistant

David M R Martin

Art Department

David M R Martin

Production Assistant

Mike Matesic

Carpenter

Judy Matthews

Location Manager

Michael D Maxson

Other

Catherine Mcconnell

Other

Russ Mccormack

Electrician

John L Mccormick

Wardrobe Assistant

Thomas Titus Mccue

Driver

Michael J Mckee

Carpenter

Dennis Michaels

Driver

Barbara Miller

Other

Michele M Misiti

Other

Ronald A Modro

Assistant

John G Morgan

On-Set Dresser

John D Morrison

Electrician

Nancy Mosser

Extras Agent/Coordinator

John S Moyer

Camera Operator

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Crime
Thriller
Adaptation
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 47m

Articles

Pop Culture 101 - Diabolique


The twist ending of Diabolique entered pop-culture like a tidal wave. Shortly after, television shows like The Twilight Zone and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour would routinely use twist endings.

The central plot twist of Ira Levin's play Deathtrap (1982) is a direct lift from Diabolique.

The movie's shock killing paved the way for such movies as Psycho (1960).

The movie was remade several times, including Reflections of Murder, a 1974 made-for-TV-movie, directed by John Badham, starring Tuesday Weld, Joan Hackett and Sam Waterston and in 1996 for theatrical release, starring Sharon Stone and Isabelle Adjani.

The bathtub scene is mirrored in the book and movie versions of Stephen King's The Shining (1980). The discovered typewritten page, with Michel's name typed repeatedly in different formations, also shows up in the film version of The Shining with the now famous discovery by Wendy of Jack's "All Work and No Play Make Jack a Dull Boy" manuscripts.

by Greg Ferrara

Pop Culture 101 - Diabolique

Pop Culture 101 - Diabolique

The twist ending of Diabolique entered pop-culture like a tidal wave. Shortly after, television shows like The Twilight Zone and The Alfred Hitchcock Hour would routinely use twist endings. The central plot twist of Ira Levin's play Deathtrap (1982) is a direct lift from Diabolique. The movie's shock killing paved the way for such movies as Psycho (1960). The movie was remade several times, including Reflections of Murder, a 1974 made-for-TV-movie, directed by John Badham, starring Tuesday Weld, Joan Hackett and Sam Waterston and in 1996 for theatrical release, starring Sharon Stone and Isabelle Adjani. The bathtub scene is mirrored in the book and movie versions of Stephen King's The Shining (1980). The discovered typewritten page, with Michel's name typed repeatedly in different formations, also shows up in the film version of The Shining with the now famous discovery by Wendy of Jack's "All Work and No Play Make Jack a Dull Boy" manuscripts. by Greg Ferrara

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)


Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62.

Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe.

It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art.

Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent.

After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray.

His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month.

Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing.

by Michael T. Toole

Spalding Gray (1941-2004)

Spalding Gray, the self-effacing monologist and actor, whose best work offered a sublime mix of personal confessions and politically charged insights, was confirmed dead on March 8 one day after his body was found in New York City's East River. He had been missing for two months and family members had feared he had committed suicide. He was 62. Gray was born in Barrington, Rhode Island on June 5, 1941, one of three sons born to Rockwell and Elizabeth Gray. He began pursuing an acting career at Emerson College in Boston. After graduation, he relocated to New York, where he acted in several plays in the late '60s and early '70s. He scored a breakthrough when he landed the lead role of Hoss in Sam Shepard's Off-Broadway hit Tooth of Crime in its 1973 New York premiere. Three years later he co-founded the avant-garde theatrical troupe, The Wooster Group with Willem Dafoe. It was this period in the late '70s, when he was performing in Manhattan's underground theater circles, did Gray carve out his niche as a skilled monologist. His first formal monologue was about his childhood Sex and Death to the Age 14, performed at the Performing Garage in Manhattan in 1979; next came his adventures as a young university student Booze, Cars and College Girls in 1980; and the following year, he dealt with his chronicles as a struggling actor, A Personal History of the American Theater. These productions were all critical successes, and Gray soon became the darling of a small cult as his harrowing but funny takes on revealing the emotional and psychological cracks in his life brought some fresh air to the genre of performance art. Although acting in small parts in film since the '70s, it wasn't until he garnered a role in The Killing Fields (1984), that he began to gain more prominent exposure. His experiences making The Killing Fields formed the basis of his one-man stage show Swimming to Cambodia which premiered on Off-Broadway in 1985. Both haunting and humorous, the plainsong sincerity of his performance exuded a raw immediacy and fragile power. Gray managed to relate his personal turmoil to larger issues of morality throughout the play, including absurdities in filmmaking, prostitution in Bangkok (where the movie was shot), and the genocidal reign of the Pol Pot. Gray won an Obie Award - the Off-Broadway's equivalent to the Tony Award - for his performance and two years later, his play was adapted by Jonathan Demme onto film, further broadening his acceptance as a unique and vital artistic talent. After the success of Swimming to Cambodia, Gray found some work in the mainstream: Bette Midler's fiance in Beaches (1988), a regular part for one season as Fran Drescher's therapist in the CBS sitcom The Nanny (1989-90), a sardonic editor in Ron Howard's underrated comedy The Paper (1994), and a recent appearance as a doctor in Meg Ryan's romantic farce Kate & Leopold (2001). He also had two more of his monologues adapted to film: Monster in a Box (1992) and Gray's Anatomy (1996). Both films were further meditations on life and death done with the kind of biting personal wit that was the charming trademark of Gray. His life took a sudden downturn when he suffered a frightening head-on car crash during a 2001 vacation in Ireland to celebrate his 60th birthday. He suffered a cracked skull, a broken hip and nerve damage to one foot and although he recovered physically, the incident left him traumatized. He tried jumping from a bridge near his Long Island home in October 2002. Family members, fearing for his safety, and well aware of his family history of mental illness (his mother committed suicide in 1967) convinced him to seek treatment in a Connecticut psychiatric hospital the following month. Sadly, despite his release, Gary's mental outlook did not improve. He was last seen leaving his Manhattan apartment on January 10, and witnesses had reported a man fitting Gray's description look despondent and upset on the Staten Island Ferry that evening. He is survived by his spouse Kathleen Russo; two sons, Forrest and Theo; Russo's daughter from a previous relationship, Marissa; and two brothers, Rockwell and Channing. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted Best Foreign Language Film of the Year (shared with "Umberto D") by the 1955 New York Film Critics Association.

Voted One of the Year's Five Best Foreign Films by the 1955 National Board of Review.

Released in United States on Video July 30, 1996

Released in United States Spring March 22, 1996

Shown in New York City (Cinema Village as part of Janus Films 40th Anniversary Film Festival December 13, 1996 - January 2, 1997.

A 1974 television movie, "Reflections of Murder," was based on the novel, directed by John Badham and starring Tuesday Weld, Joan Hackett and Sam Waterston.

A 1993 television film, "House of Secrets," was inspired by the novel and starred Melissa Gilbert and Bruce Boxleitner.

Based upon Henri-Georges Clouzot's Hitchcockian thriller "Les Diaboliques" (France/1954), from the novel "Celle qui n'etait pas" by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac and screenplay by Clouzot, Jerome Geronimi, Frederic Grendel and Rene Masson. The film starred Simone Signoret, Paul Meurisse and Vera Clouzot.

Began shooting July 25, 1995.

Completed shooting October 28, 1995.

Remade in 1996, starring Sharon Stone and Isabelle Adjani.

Released in United States Spring March 22, 1996

Released in United States on Video July 30, 1996