Mars Attacks!


1h 43m 1996

Brief Synopsis

Aliens invade earth pertending to be peaceful.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Kingman, Arizona, USA; Burns, Kansas, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Synopsis

A fleet of Martian spacecraft surrounds the world's major cities and all of humanity waits to see if the extraterrestrial visitors have, as they claim, "come in peace." U.S. President James Dale receives assurance from science professor Donald Kessler that the Martians' mission is a friendly one. But when a peaceful exchange ends in the total annihilation of the U.S. Congress, military men call for a full-scale nuclear retaliation.

Crew

Michael Adkisson

2-D Artist

Alia Agha

3-D Artist

Astrig Akseralian

Other

Kipp A Aldrich

Video

Scott Alexander

Other

Kokayi Ampah

Location Manager

Tim Amyx

Assistant Editor

Adrienne Anderson

Production

David Andrews

Visual Effects Supervisor

E Antwi

Song

Chad Arganbright

Assistant

Christopher Armstrong

Animator

Herach Arzounian

Other

Colleen Atwood

Costume Designer

Larry Aube

Key Grip

Jillan Backus

2-D Artist

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Rhonda Baer

Assistant Location Manager

Sandina Bailo Lape

Foley Editor

Noel Baker

Art Department

Kyle Balda

Animator

Perry Barndt

Stunts

C C Barnes

Assistant Director

Stanton Barrett

Stunts

Daniel W. Barringer

Stunts

Matt Barry

Casting

Steve Bartek

Original Music

Steve Bartek

Music

Colin Batty

Art Department

Darren Bedwell

2-D Artist

Linda Bel

Animator

Jeffrey Benedict

Visual Effects

Rhett Bennett

Graphic Artist

Jeffrey Benoit

Graphic Artist

David Benson

Other

Richard Berger

Set Designer

Paul F Bernard

Assistant Director

Ken Beyer

Other

Joe Biggins

Set Production Assistant

Andrea Biklian

Other

Steve Boeddeker

Sound

Sara Bolder

Dialogue Editor

Cathy Bond

Assistant Director

Patrick Bonneau

Animator

Joey Box

Stunts

Jill Brooks

Effects Coordinator

Clyde E Bryan

Assistant Camera Operator

Lindsay Burnett

Effects Assistant

Tim Burton

Producer

Heather Bushman

Graphic Artist

Bonjin Byun

2-D Artist

Diane Caliva

Other

Susan Campbell

Animator

Phil Carlig

2-D Artist

Tami Carter

Visual Effects

George Cates

Song

Amelia Chenoweth

Visual Effects

George Kee Cheung

Stunts

Lisa Chino

Sound

Phil Chong

Stunts

Andy Chua

Technical Advisor

Tim Clark

Matte Painter

Michael Coo

Key Grip

Theresa Corrao

Production

Geraldine Corrigan

Costume Supervisor

Mike Cuevas

Assistant

Bruce Dahl

Animator

Peter Daulton

Animator

Robert Dawson

Titles

Ray De La Motte

Camera Operator

Vincent De Quattro

Graphic Artist

Paul Deason

Associate Producer

Paul Deason

Unit Production Manager

Lou Dellarosa

Animator

Natasha Devaud

Visual Effects

Rhonda Devictor

Assistant

John E. Dexter

Art Director

Alan Disler

Assistant Camera Operator

Danilo Dixon

Consultant

Mark Donaldson

Stunts

Adam Dotson

Graphic Artist

Peter J Dowd

Set Production Assistant

David Dresher

Editor

Ed Dunkley

Editor

Joe Dunne

Stunt Coordinator

Richard Duran

Stunts

Russell Earl

Visual Effects

Martin Elfalan

Assistant Production Accountant

Danny Elfman

Music

Donald Elliott

Special Effects Foreman

Mike Ellis

Visual Effects

Jenn Emberly

Animator

Jann Engel

Assistant Art Director

Jamie Engle

Graphic Artist

Shannon Erbe

Music

Corey Eubanks

Stunts

Frank Eulner

Sound Effects Editor

Mark Farquhar

Graphic Artist

Andre Fenley

Assistant Sound Editor

Richard Fernandez

Assistant Art Director

Filo

Song

Michael L. Fink

Visual Effects Supervisor

Larry Fisch

Assistant Producer

Ken Fischer

Sound Effects Editor

George Fisher

Stunts

Cliff Fleming

Other

Fortunato Frattasio

Art Department

Heather French

Dga Trainee

Rudolf Friml

Song

David Garden

Assistant Camera Operator

Steve Gawley

Visual Effects

Lucy Gell

Other

Jonathan Gems

Screenplay

Jonathan Gems

Story By

Lynn M Gephart

2-D Artist

Barry Gibb

Song

Maurice Gibb

Song

Robin Gibb

Song

Tanner Gill

Stunts

Vincent M Giordano

Graphic Artist

Susan Goldsmith

Visual Effects

Tim Gonzales

Craft Service

Frank Gravatt

Visual Effects

Robert Greenfield

Other

Dave Gregory

Color Timer

Martin L Grimes

Assistant Property Master

Grant Guenin

Art Department

Gary Guercio

Stunts

Gerald Gutschimdt

Visual Effects

Mark Hadland

Lighting

Mary Beth Haggerty

Visual Effects

Nancy Haigh

Set Decorator

Gregory G. Hale

Set Production Assistant

Sherry Ham

Stunts

Oscar Hammerstein Ii

Song

Dick Hancock

Stunts

Otto Harbach

Song

Geoff Harding

Assistant Location Manager

Tim Harrington

Animator

Kelly Hartigan

Graphic Artist

Christian Hatfield

Graphic Artist

Jack Haye

Other

Georgina Hayns

Other

Matthew Head

Graphic Artist

Angela Heald

Production Associate

Rose Heeter

Assistant

James Hegedus

Art Director

Michael 'ffish' Hemschoot

2-D Artist

Julie Hewett

Makeup

Christina Hills

Visual Effects

David Hisanaga

Visual Effects

Rupert Holmes

Song Performer

Rupert Holmes

Song

Craig Hosking

Pilot

Jim Hourihan

Other

Rick Howe

Assistant Editor

Tony Hudson

Visual Effects

Roger Huynh

Graphic Artist

Greg Hyman

Editor

Richard Hymns

Sound Editor

Carolyn Ippisch

Graphic Artist

Steven Ito

Stunts

Hiroki Itokazu

Graphic Artist

Jason Ivimey

Animator

Michael Anthony Jackson

Visual Effects

Todd Jahnke

Graphic Artist

Arthur Jeppe

Graphic Artist

Christopher Michael Johnson

Assistant

Jesse V. Johnson

Stunts

Marci R Johnson

Costumes

Randy Johnson

3-D Artist

Barry Jones

Production Supervisor

Doug Jones

Negative Cutting

Tom Jones

Song Performer

Leif Jonker

Assistant Location Manager

Alice Kaiserian

Graphic Artist

Dan Kamin

Consultant

Artie Kane

Music Conductor

Larry Karaszewski

Other

David Kelley

Assistant Director

Ian C Kelly

Video Assist/Playback

Mitchell Kenney

Costumes

Christine Keogh

Other

Greg Killmaster

Visual Effects

Bill Kimberlin

Editor

Ian Kincaid

Lighting Technician

Bill King

Boom Operator

Jeanmarie King

Production

Erik Knight

Artistic Advisor

Heather Knight

Animator

John Kohn

Art Department

Craig Kohtala

Best Boy

Bill Konersman

Technical Supervisor

Hannah Kozak

Stunts

Gary A Krakoff

Construction Coordinator

Diane Krakower

Assistant

Chris Kubsch

Visual Effects

James Kuo

Graphic Artist

Jean-claude Langer

Visual Effects

Louie Lantieri

Special Effects

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Action
Adaptation
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1996
Distribution Company
WARNER BROS. PICTURES DISTRIBUTION (WBPD)
Location
Washington, DC, USA; Las Vegas, Nevada, USA; Los Angeles, California, USA; Kingman, Arizona, USA; Burns, Kansas, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 43m

Articles

Mars Attacks!


Tim Burton's outlandish sci-fi parody, Mars Attacks! (1996) is the first film to have been based on a set of trading cards, and it sure as hell seems like it. Burton, who's seldom concerned with generating story momentum or weaving together intricate plot threads, simply lets a stellar cast of actors run wild while they get vaporized by ray gun-wielding little green men. If you're looking for connective tissue between the various scenes of intergalactic destruction, you'll have to settle for troops of computer-animated rabble-rousers endlessly going "Yak-yak-yak!" (More on that later.)

For what it's worth, Jack Nicholson plays two roles - a Las Vegas real estate hustler and an excessively dimwitted U.S. President who completely misreads an earthly visit from what he imagines to be friendly space aliens. The aliens play nice for a little while, but it's not long before they're blowing the planet to smithereens, one building and scenery-chewing actor at a time. Rod Steiger, who plays a gung-ho military commander, tries to stop them with force, but he's...um...unsuccessful. No one in the movie has the slightest idea how to handle the attack, and they basically get fried for your amusement in scene after scene.

So how did Mars Attacks! make the leap from colorful little pieces of cardboard to a very expensive celluloid epic featuring such luminaries as Nicholson, Glenn Close, Annette Bening, Martin Short, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Steiger? Not long after completing what may well be his most fully-realized film, Ed Wood (1994), Burton began formulating ideas for his next project. While talking to executives at Warner Bros., he came across a series of 1970s Topps trading cards entitled, Dinosaur Attacks!, which detailed the damage that might occur if a bunch of dinosaurs went rampaging through a modern American city. Burton vaguely recalled a similar set of concept cards from his own childhood, but wasn't certain if he was just imagining that they existed.

It turned out they were real. In 1962, Topps had issued a series of cards called Mars Attacks!, but they contained some scenes that were deemed too "intense" for younger children, and they were quickly removed from the marketplace. This, of course, sent kids around America scrambling to collect them. Over the years, they had become very hot items at card shows. Warner Bros. soon secured the rights to the Mars Attacks! series, and Burton and screenwriter Jonathan Gems set about turning the various images into a bizarrely entertaining but chaotic narrative.

Burton loved alien invasion movies when he was growing up, and was primed to put a modern, satirical twist on them. "They meant everything to me," he once said. "They're like a collective, primal fairy tale. I've watched them voraciously ever since I was a kid, and I can never remember what they're about. They all sort of meld together. But the things you see as a child remain with you, especially if you like them." How he got from there to having Jim Brown run around in a Roman centurion's outfit while fighting off laser blasts is anybody's guess.

The special effects, of course, were the real stars of the film and the screenplay contained more than 120 shots of global destruction and flying saucer action scenes. Scale models of such famous tourist attractions as Big Ben, the Capitol Records Building in Los Angeles, the Eiffel Tower and others were constructed only to be zapped by the Martians in quick succession. One of the most detailed sequences was the title credits in which the Martians are seen departing the Red Planet for Earth, requiring two and a half minutes of saucer animation.

As for the Martians' "yak-yak"-style dialogue, when the screenplay was originally written, there was a lot of genuine conversation between the aliens. But Warner Bros. thought the script was too long given the one-joke premise -- so Burton removed all the interplanetary chit-chat and just let the aliens make what he considered to be a funny sound. "We did a storyboard reel using a cheap tape recorder," Burton later explained. "And we don't even remember who did it - someone just did yak-yak-yak when it came time for the Martians to speak."

Burton told his sound men that he wanted the aliens to make that particular noise when they spoke, but their attempts to re-create the low-tech "yak-yak" always came out too polished. So Burton ended up using the original, cheapo track, rather than wasting more time and money on something that, in the end, probably wouldn't have worked as well anyway. That's a nice little cost-cutter...not that it helps all that much when you have teams of computer whizzes animating an Army of nihilistic space invaders and figuring out how to put Sarah Jessica Parker's head on a dog's body. Sometimes you just can't scrimp.

Additional Trivia:
- Warren Beatty was originally approached to play the President but turned it down.
- The sound effect for the ray guns was taken from the 1953 version of The War of the Worlds.
- Lisa Marie, the Martian Girl, had to be sewn into her costume every day to make it appear as seamless as possible - Mars Attacks! had originally been scheduled for a Christmas release which explains Burton's color preference for scenes in which victims vaporized by the Martians became glowing green or red skeletons.
- Pahrump, Nevada, the home of talk show host Art Bell whose favorite topic is aliens and close encounters, is where the Martians first land in Mars Attacks!.

Director: Tim Burton
Producers: Larry J. Franco, Tim Burton
Screenplay: Jonathan Gems
Cinematography: Peter Suschitzky
Music: Danny Elfman
Editor: Chris Lebenzon
Production Design: Wynn Thomas
Art Direction: John Dexter
Set Design: Richard G. Berger, Nancy Haigh, Randy Thom
Costume Design: Colleen Atwood
Sound/Sound Design: Dennis Maitland, Sr.
Principal Cast: Jack Nicholson (Art Land/President Dale), Glenn Close (Marsha Dale), Annette Bening (Barbara Land), Pierce Brosnan (Donald Kessler), Danny DeVito (Rude Gambler), Jim Brown (Byron Williams), Martin Short (Jerry Ross), Michael J. Fox (Jason Stone), Pam Grier (Louise Williams), Tom Jones (Himself), Sarah Jessica Parker (Nathalie Lake), Natalie Portman (Taffy Dale), Sylvia Sidney (Grandma Norris), Rod Steiger (Gen. Decker), Paul Winfield (Gen. Casey).
C-103m. Letterboxed.

by Paul Tatara
Mars Attacks!

Mars Attacks!

Tim Burton's outlandish sci-fi parody, Mars Attacks! (1996) is the first film to have been based on a set of trading cards, and it sure as hell seems like it. Burton, who's seldom concerned with generating story momentum or weaving together intricate plot threads, simply lets a stellar cast of actors run wild while they get vaporized by ray gun-wielding little green men. If you're looking for connective tissue between the various scenes of intergalactic destruction, you'll have to settle for troops of computer-animated rabble-rousers endlessly going "Yak-yak-yak!" (More on that later.) For what it's worth, Jack Nicholson plays two roles - a Las Vegas real estate hustler and an excessively dimwitted U.S. President who completely misreads an earthly visit from what he imagines to be friendly space aliens. The aliens play nice for a little while, but it's not long before they're blowing the planet to smithereens, one building and scenery-chewing actor at a time. Rod Steiger, who plays a gung-ho military commander, tries to stop them with force, but he's...um...unsuccessful. No one in the movie has the slightest idea how to handle the attack, and they basically get fried for your amusement in scene after scene. So how did Mars Attacks! make the leap from colorful little pieces of cardboard to a very expensive celluloid epic featuring such luminaries as Nicholson, Glenn Close, Annette Bening, Martin Short, Sarah Jessica Parker, and Steiger? Not long after completing what may well be his most fully-realized film, Ed Wood (1994), Burton began formulating ideas for his next project. While talking to executives at Warner Bros., he came across a series of 1970s Topps trading cards entitled, Dinosaur Attacks!, which detailed the damage that might occur if a bunch of dinosaurs went rampaging through a modern American city. Burton vaguely recalled a similar set of concept cards from his own childhood, but wasn't certain if he was just imagining that they existed. It turned out they were real. In 1962, Topps had issued a series of cards called Mars Attacks!, but they contained some scenes that were deemed too "intense" for younger children, and they were quickly removed from the marketplace. This, of course, sent kids around America scrambling to collect them. Over the years, they had become very hot items at card shows. Warner Bros. soon secured the rights to the Mars Attacks! series, and Burton and screenwriter Jonathan Gems set about turning the various images into a bizarrely entertaining but chaotic narrative. Burton loved alien invasion movies when he was growing up, and was primed to put a modern, satirical twist on them. "They meant everything to me," he once said. "They're like a collective, primal fairy tale. I've watched them voraciously ever since I was a kid, and I can never remember what they're about. They all sort of meld together. But the things you see as a child remain with you, especially if you like them." How he got from there to having Jim Brown run around in a Roman centurion's outfit while fighting off laser blasts is anybody's guess. The special effects, of course, were the real stars of the film and the screenplay contained more than 120 shots of global destruction and flying saucer action scenes. Scale models of such famous tourist attractions as Big Ben, the Capitol Records Building in Los Angeles, the Eiffel Tower and others were constructed only to be zapped by the Martians in quick succession. One of the most detailed sequences was the title credits in which the Martians are seen departing the Red Planet for Earth, requiring two and a half minutes of saucer animation. As for the Martians' "yak-yak"-style dialogue, when the screenplay was originally written, there was a lot of genuine conversation between the aliens. But Warner Bros. thought the script was too long given the one-joke premise -- so Burton removed all the interplanetary chit-chat and just let the aliens make what he considered to be a funny sound. "We did a storyboard reel using a cheap tape recorder," Burton later explained. "And we don't even remember who did it - someone just did yak-yak-yak when it came time for the Martians to speak." Burton told his sound men that he wanted the aliens to make that particular noise when they spoke, but their attempts to re-create the low-tech "yak-yak" always came out too polished. So Burton ended up using the original, cheapo track, rather than wasting more time and money on something that, in the end, probably wouldn't have worked as well anyway. That's a nice little cost-cutter...not that it helps all that much when you have teams of computer whizzes animating an Army of nihilistic space invaders and figuring out how to put Sarah Jessica Parker's head on a dog's body. Sometimes you just can't scrimp. Additional Trivia: - Warren Beatty was originally approached to play the President but turned it down. - The sound effect for the ray guns was taken from the 1953 version of The War of the Worlds. - Lisa Marie, the Martian Girl, had to be sewn into her costume every day to make it appear as seamless as possible - Mars Attacks! had originally been scheduled for a Christmas release which explains Burton's color preference for scenes in which victims vaporized by the Martians became glowing green or red skeletons. - Pahrump, Nevada, the home of talk show host Art Bell whose favorite topic is aliens and close encounters, is where the Martians first land in Mars Attacks!. Director: Tim Burton Producers: Larry J. Franco, Tim Burton Screenplay: Jonathan Gems Cinematography: Peter Suschitzky Music: Danny Elfman Editor: Chris Lebenzon Production Design: Wynn Thomas Art Direction: John Dexter Set Design: Richard G. Berger, Nancy Haigh, Randy Thom Costume Design: Colleen Atwood Sound/Sound Design: Dennis Maitland, Sr. Principal Cast: Jack Nicholson (Art Land/President Dale), Glenn Close (Marsha Dale), Annette Bening (Barbara Land), Pierce Brosnan (Donald Kessler), Danny DeVito (Rude Gambler), Jim Brown (Byron Williams), Martin Short (Jerry Ross), Michael J. Fox (Jason Stone), Pam Grier (Louise Williams), Tom Jones (Himself), Sarah Jessica Parker (Nathalie Lake), Natalie Portman (Taffy Dale), Sylvia Sidney (Grandma Norris), Rod Steiger (Gen. Decker), Paul Winfield (Gen. Casey). C-103m. Letterboxed. by Paul Tatara

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger


ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002

From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965).

Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema.

It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines.

As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure.

Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie.

Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them.

by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

TCM Remembers - Rod Steiger

ROD STEIGER, 1925 - 2002 From the docks of New York to the rural back roads of Mississippi to the war torn Russian steppes, Rod Steiger reveled in creating some of the most overpowering and difficult men on the screen. He could be a total scoundrel, embodying Machiavelli's idiom that "it's better to be feared than loved" in the movies. But as an actor he refused to be typecast and his wide range included characters who were secretly tormented (The Pawnbroker, 1965) or loners (Run of the Arrow, 1965) or eccentrics (The Loved One, 1965). Along with Marlon Brando, Steiger helped bring the 'Method School' from the Group Theater and Actors Studio in New York to the screens of Hollywood. The Method technique, taught by Stella Adler and Lee Strasberg, insisted on complete immersion into the character's psyche and resulted in intense, dramatic performances and performers. Steiger made his first significant screen appearance as Brando's older brother in On the Waterfront (1954). Their climatic scene together in a taxicab is one of the great moments in American cinema. It was a short leap from playing a crooked lawyer in On the Waterfront to playing the shady boxing promoter in The Harder They Fall (1956). Based on the tragic tale of true-life fighter Primo Carnera, The Harder They Fall details the corruption behind the scenes of professional boxing bouts. Steiger is a fight manager named Nick Benko who enlists newspaperman Eddie Willis (Humphrey Bogart in his final screen appearance) to drum up publicity for a fixed prizefight. While the boxing scenes were often brutally realistic, the most powerful dramatic moments took place between Steiger and Bogart on the sidelines. As mob boss Al Capone (1959), Steiger got to play another man you loved to hate. He vividly depicted the criminal from his swaggering early days to his pathetic demise from syphilis. In Doctor Zhivago (1965), Steiger was the only American in the international cast, playing the hateful and perverse Komarovsky. During the production of Dr. Zhivago, Steiger often found himself at odds with director David Lean. Schooled in the British tradition, Lean valued the integrity of the script and demanded that actors remain faithful to the script. Steiger, on the other hand, relied on improvisation and spontaneity. When kissing the lovely Lara (played by Julie Christie), Steiger jammed his tongue into Christie's mouth to produce the desired reaction - disgust. It worked! While it might not have been Lean's approach, it brought a grittier edge to the prestige production and made Komarovsky is a detestable but truly memorable figure. Steiger dared audiences to dislike him. As the smalltown southern Sheriff Gillespie in In The Heat of the Night (1967), Steiger embodied all the prejudices and suspicions of a racist. When a black northern lawyer, played by Sidney Poitier, arrives on the crime scene, Gillespie is forced to recognize his fellow man as an equal despite skin color. Here, Steiger's character started as a bigot and developed into a better man. He finally claimed a Best Actor Academy Award for his performance as Sheriff Gillespie. Steiger was an actor's actor. A chameleon who didn't think twice about diving into challenging roles that others would shy away from. In the Private Screenings interview he did with host Robert Osborne he admitted that Paul Muni was one of his idols because of his total immersion into his roles. Steiger said, "I believe actors are supposed to create different human beings." And Steiger showed us a rich and diverse cross section of them. by Jeremy Geltzer & Jeff Stafford

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter December 13, 1996

Released in United States on Video June 17, 1997

Released in United States February 1997

Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (out of competition) February 13-24, 1997.

Based on the series of Topps trading cards which were first distributed in 1962.

Completed shooting June 1, 1996.

Began shooting February 26, 1996.

Released in United States Winter December 13, 1996

Released in United States on Video June 17, 1997

Released in United States February 1997 (Shown at Berlin International Film Festival (out of competition) February 13-24, 1997.)