Crimson Tide


1h 52m 1995

Brief Synopsis

A submarine officer mutinies against his trigger-happy captain to prevent a world war.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rött hav, USS Alabama
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Thriller
War
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Synopsis

When a volatile Russian nationalist and a rebel faction of the former Soviet Union Army seize control of a nuclear missile base, it triggers the greatest global emergency since the Cuban Missile Crisis. With the world on the brink of disaster, the USS Alabama sets sail, patrolling Russian waters with enough nuclear firepower to start World War III. As the crisis escalates, the unthinkable occurs: the Alabama is given an order to launch its nuclear missles. In the resulting chaos, two dedicated naval officers--the Alabama's seasoned commander, Captain Frank Ramsey, and his brilliant executive officer, Lieutenant Commander Ron Hunter--clash over the validity of their orders and vie for control of the sub.

Crew

Michael Adler

Electrician

John Agalsoff

Video Playback

Jennifer Amerine

Assistant

David Anthony

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Pete Antico

Stunts

Michael D Antunez

Transportation Coordinator

Robert Arnold

Stunts

Linda C Azevedo

Accounting Assistant

Bob Badami

Music Editor

James Balker

Costumes

Bob Baron

Adr Mixer

Matt Barry

Casting Associate

David Bartholomew

Gaffer

Kevin Bartnof

Foley Artist

Scott Beattie

Photography

Johnny Beyers

Electrician

Andrea Bottigliero

Assistant Editor

John W Brilhante

Other

Jerry Bruckheimer

Producer

Tom Bruggeman

Stunts

Thomas R Bryant

Editor

Fred Burke

Foley Editor

Emma Burnham

Assistant

Rob Burton

Production Supervisor

Paul Calabria

Animal Trainer

Scott Campbell

Photography

Robert Camron

Swing Gang

Eddie A Canett

Transportation Captain

Darren A Caperna

Stunts

Anjelica Casillas

Visual Effects

Ray Cavalluzzi

Visual Effects

Patti Cerrari

Video

Matthew B. Chamberlin

Production Assistant

George M Chappell

Electrician

Michael Chavez

Costumes

Rick Chavez

Assistant Property Master

Linda R Chen

Photography

Kevin Clark

Editor

Ellis Cohen

Costume Supervisor

Alan Colbert

Electrician

Midge Costin

Sound Editor

John Cucura

Electrician

Tonia Davall

Music Contractor

Robert Dawson

Titles

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Dan Deleeuw

Digital Effects Supervisor

Al Demayo

Lighting

Dennis Dewaay

Construction Coordinator

Jim Dickson

Director Of Photography

Jim Dickson

Dp/Cinematographer

Robert Bruce Dickson

Other

Tony Diep

Video

Aafred A Disarro

Special Effects Coordinator

Amy L Disarro

Production Assistant

Mitch Dobrowner

Technical Operations Manager

David Dresher

Assistant Editor

Rob Dressel

Cgi Artist

Janet Earl

Video

Tzarina V Edillon

Apprentice

John Ellingwood

Assistant Camera Operator

Juno J. Ellis

Adr Editor

Warren Farinia

Visual Effects

John Paul Fasal

Sound Effects

Steven E Fegley

Foreman

Dominic Fidelibus

Other

Brenda Finster

Production Assistant

Kevin Fitzgerald

Photography

Andrew Form

Assistant

Crys Forsyth-smith

Production Coordinator

Lucas Foster

Executive Producer

Michael Fottrell

Production Manager

Bruce L. Fowler

Original Music

Wendi Friedman

Assistant

Marva Fucci

Assistant Sound Editor

Jan Garner

Production Accountant

Duffy Gaver

Other

Tom Gibson

Best Boy Grip

Nick Glennie-smith

Music Conductor

Nick Glennie-smith

Original Music

Jennifer Good

Assistant Production Coordinator

Eric Gotthelf

Foley Mixer

John E Gray

Special Effects

Shai Greenberg

Other

Harry Gregson-williams

Music Conductor

Rhonda Gunner

Video

Randy Gunter

Assistant Property Master

Sean Hargreaves

Visual Effects

Barbara Harris

Adr Voice Casting

Matthew Harrison

Foley Editor

Hendrik Hartono

Video

Jerry Heiss

Assistant

Richard P Henrick

Story By

Richard P Henrick

From Story

John Hess

Visual Effects

John Hinkle

Other

Dennis Hoffman

Visual Effects

Richard Hollander

Video

Christopher Holt

Rerecording

Christopher Holt

Other

Clayton Holt

Stunts

Conn Horgan

Stunts

Denise Horta

Adr Editor

Frank Howard

Sound Editor

Rick Howe

Assistant Editor

Paul Hulme

Other

Fred Iguchi

Engineering Supervisor

Dream Quest Images

Visual Effects

Deborah Johnson

Production Assistant

Linden Johnson

Accounting Assistant

Mark Benton Johnson

Assistant Location Manager

Rick Johnson

Photography

Suhail F Kafity

Sound Editor

Will Kaplan

Music Editor

William B. Kaplan

Sound Mixer

Dan Kaufman

Video

Tracy L Kettler

Production Coordinator

Vanessa Kirby

Production Assistant

Rick Kline

Rerecording

Hilary Klym

Grip

Cecil Kramer

Visual Effects

Dennis J Laine

Assistant Camera Operator

Harry Lam

Video

Jeffrey Laplante

Accounting Assistant

Pat Latona

Swing Gang

Ernest H Lauterio

Craft Service

Richard J Lawrence

Set Designer

Chris Lebenzon

Editor

Sean Lee

Video

Thomas R Lee

Grip

Melonie Lewis

Assistant

Brian Liberman

Grip

James Likowski

Foley Editor

Anthony J Lipin

Costumes

George L. Little

Costume Designer

Adam Lovell

Visual Effects

Daniel E Maltese

Assistant Art Director

Christopher L. Marino

Production Assistant

Todd Marrero

Assistant

Eric L Marshall

Production Assistant

Johnny M Martin

Stunts

Victoria Martin

Foley Editor

Pere Martinez

Video

Charles A May

Video

Jeanne Mccarthy

Casting Associate

Karen Mcelhatton

Animal Trainer

James Mcgeachy

Visual Effects

Don Mcgovern

Stunts

Ladd Mcintosh

Original Music

Dennis Mckeehan

Transportation Captain

Gregory L Mcmurry

Video

Carl Mergenthaler

Stunts

Mark J. Meyers

Grip

Alan Meyerson

Consultant

Duane Mialiwocki

Assistant Camera Operator

Mickey S. Michaels

Set Decorator

F Hudson Miller

Sound Editor

Michael Mills

Prosthetics

Claudio Miranda

Lighting Technician

Danny Moder

Production Assistant

Mike Moder

Executive Producer

Tony Moffett

Visual Effects

Gene Molnar

Swing Gang

Craig Moore

Photography

Suzette Moriarty

Original Music

James J Murakami

Art Director

Peggy Names

Other

Nick Navarro

Set Designer

Jim Nickerson

Stunts

Mike Norville

Video

Paul O'bryan

Assistant Sound Editor

Kevin O'connell

Rerecording

Alan Oliney

Stunts

Maggie Ostroff

Assistant Sound Editor

Marlo Pabon

Art Director

R J Palmer

Sound Editor

Michael Papac

Property Master

Chuck Picerni Jr.

Stunts

Steve Picerni

Stunt Coordinator

Craig Pointes

Location Manager

J Michael Popovich

Key Grip

Larry Potoker

Video

Gary Price

Stunts

George Prior

Photography

Bob Putynkowski

Color Timer

Joe Ramsey

Special Effects Foreman

Chris Reynolds

Grip

Charlene Richards

Adr Mixer

Jay Rifkin

Music

Edwin Rivera

Video

Demian Rosenblatt

Video

Shea Rowan

Production Assistant

Catherine Rowe

Foley Artist

Thomas J Ruffner

Grip

Greg P. Russell

Rerecording

Nicole Sampogna

Video

Earl Sampson

Boom Operator

Guy Sappington

Apprentice

Martin Schaer

Camera Operator

Christopher Schiavo

Assistant Sound Editor

Michael Schiffer

Story By

Film Details

Also Known As
Rött hav, USS Alabama
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Adventure
Thriller
War
Release Date
1995
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA; France

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 52m

Award Nominations

Best Editing

1995
Chris Lebenzon

Best Sound

1995

Best Sound Editing

1995

Articles

Crimson Tide


Tony Scott, brother of director Ridley Scott, was no stranger to military action movies when he signed on to direct Crimson Tide (1995), the story of a submarine poised on the brink of a devastating nuclear war. He had directed the Tom Cruise Air Force adventure Top Gun (1986), but unlike the earlier film, many critics found this picture, for all its epic scope and action sequences, to also be a worthy character study played by two strong actors, Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington.

Washington was not the first choice for the role of the young, by-the-books Naval officer who clashes with a hardened veteran commander inclined to act from his well-honed instincts when their submarine, ordered into Russian waters to stop a potential nuclear attack against the U.S., loses radio contact with the topside world. Val Kilmer had been sought but declined, a decision he later regretted, and Brad Pitt was also considered. Al Pacino had been considered for Hackman's part as the ship's commander. The two roles fit well within the tradition of the Navy film format, pitting two very different men of different generations against each other in times of crisis, a plot element evident in such movies as Mutiny on the Bounty (in all its many versions) and Run Silent, Run Deep (1958).

There is a direct reference to the latter film in a scene in which the crew quizzes each other about submarine movies. That bit was purportedly written by Quentin Tarantino, who also contributed a character name as a tribute to a former video store co-worker. Although Michael Schiffer received the only screenplay credit, several other writers were brought in at various times to punch up the script, including Robert Towne, who wrote Chinatown (1974) and Scott's other Tom Cruise movie, Days of Thunder (1990), and Steven Zaillian, an Oscar® winner for Schindler's List (1993).

Because of the mutinous actions in the plot, the U.S. Navy refused to cooperate with Scott's request to get authentic footage of a submarine in action. As luck would have it, he found out that the USS Alabama - the same ship featured in the movie (thus, the title, which is the nickname of the University of Alabama football team) - was scheduled to ship out of Pearl Harbor within days. Scott and his crew flew to Hawaii and chased the sub via yacht and helicopter for six miles with cameras running. The Alabama's commander tried to get them to clear off and finally submerged, which was exactly what Scott wanted.

The technical adviser on the picture was Captain Skip Beard, who had once served as the commanding officer of the real Alabama. He also plays a small part in the film as a member of the Board of Inquiry.

Director: Tony Scott
Producers: Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer
Screenplay: Michael Schiffer
Cinematography: Dariusz Wolski
Editing: Chris Lebenzon
Production Design: Michael White
Original Music: Hans Zimmer
Cast: Gene Hackman (Capt. Frank Ramsey), Denzel Washington (Lt. Commander Ron Hunter), Matt Craven (Lt. Roy Zimmer), George Dzundza (Chief of the Boat), Viggo Mortensen (Lt. Peter Ince).
C-116m. Letterboxed.

by Rob Nixon
Crimson Tide

Crimson Tide

Tony Scott, brother of director Ridley Scott, was no stranger to military action movies when he signed on to direct Crimson Tide (1995), the story of a submarine poised on the brink of a devastating nuclear war. He had directed the Tom Cruise Air Force adventure Top Gun (1986), but unlike the earlier film, many critics found this picture, for all its epic scope and action sequences, to also be a worthy character study played by two strong actors, Gene Hackman and Denzel Washington. Washington was not the first choice for the role of the young, by-the-books Naval officer who clashes with a hardened veteran commander inclined to act from his well-honed instincts when their submarine, ordered into Russian waters to stop a potential nuclear attack against the U.S., loses radio contact with the topside world. Val Kilmer had been sought but declined, a decision he later regretted, and Brad Pitt was also considered. Al Pacino had been considered for Hackman's part as the ship's commander. The two roles fit well within the tradition of the Navy film format, pitting two very different men of different generations against each other in times of crisis, a plot element evident in such movies as Mutiny on the Bounty (in all its many versions) and Run Silent, Run Deep (1958). There is a direct reference to the latter film in a scene in which the crew quizzes each other about submarine movies. That bit was purportedly written by Quentin Tarantino, who also contributed a character name as a tribute to a former video store co-worker. Although Michael Schiffer received the only screenplay credit, several other writers were brought in at various times to punch up the script, including Robert Towne, who wrote Chinatown (1974) and Scott's other Tom Cruise movie, Days of Thunder (1990), and Steven Zaillian, an Oscar® winner for Schindler's List (1993). Because of the mutinous actions in the plot, the U.S. Navy refused to cooperate with Scott's request to get authentic footage of a submarine in action. As luck would have it, he found out that the USS Alabama - the same ship featured in the movie (thus, the title, which is the nickname of the University of Alabama football team) - was scheduled to ship out of Pearl Harbor within days. Scott and his crew flew to Hawaii and chased the sub via yacht and helicopter for six miles with cameras running. The Alabama's commander tried to get them to clear off and finally submerged, which was exactly what Scott wanted. The technical adviser on the picture was Captain Skip Beard, who had once served as the commanding officer of the real Alabama. He also plays a small part in the film as a member of the Board of Inquiry. Director: Tony Scott Producers: Don Simpson and Jerry Bruckheimer Screenplay: Michael Schiffer Cinematography: Dariusz Wolski Editing: Chris Lebenzon Production Design: Michael White Original Music: Hans Zimmer Cast: Gene Hackman (Capt. Frank Ramsey), Denzel Washington (Lt. Commander Ron Hunter), Matt Craven (Lt. Roy Zimmer), George Dzundza (Chief of the Boat), Viggo Mortensen (Lt. Peter Ince). C-116m. Letterboxed. by Rob Nixon

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Winner of the 1996 NAACP Image Award for Best Actor - Motion Picture (Denzel Washington).

Co-winner, along with Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" (USA/1995), of the 1996 Golden Reel Award for feature film sound editing from the Motion Picture Sound Editors. Also cited for feature film ADR editing.

Dariusz Wolski was nominated in the feature film category of the Outstanding Achievement Awards (1995) sponsored by the American Society of Cinematographers.

Released in United States Spring May 12, 1995

Released in United States on Video June 5, 1996

Released in United States 1995

Released in United States September 1995

Shown at Venice Film Festival (Opening Night) August 30 - September 9, 1995.

Shown at Deauville Film Festival (opening night) September 1-10, 1995.

Some additional photography took place in France late February 1995.

Began shooting August 15, 1994.

Completed shooting December 1, 1994.

Released in United States Spring May 12, 1995

Released in United States on Video June 5, 1996

Released in United States 1995 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (Opening Night) August 30 - September 9, 1995.)

Released in United States September 1995 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival (opening night) September 1-10, 1995.)