What About Bob?


1h 37m 1991

Brief Synopsis

An insecure mental patient horns in on his psychiatrist's family vacation.

Film Details

Also Known As
Hur mår Bob?, Quoi de neuf, Bob?
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Black Comedy
Medical
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Andrew Adams
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Synopsis

A patient becomes obsessed with both his psychologist and the doctor's family. While the doctor teaches the patient to overcome his disorder, the patient helps the doctor fix a broken relationship with his family.

Crew

Chris Abbott

Song

Stuart M. Abramson

Key Grip

Andrew Adams

Cable Operator

Cyd Adams

Assistant Director

David Anderson

Unit Production Manager

Mark A Baker

Location Manager

Florian Ballhaus

Assistant Camera Operator

Michael Ballhaus

Dp/Cinematographer

Michael Ballhaus

Director Of Photography

Audrey Bamber

Assistant

Charles Bartlett

Adr

Charles Thomas Baxter

Location Manager

Bruce R Bell

Foley Mixer

Denis Blackberry

Sound Dubbing

Farley Blackman

Other

Jack Blackman

Art Director

Darrell Blevins

Grip

Arthur Blum

Dolly Grip

Russell Bobbitt

Property Master

Ruth Britt

Adr

Nacio Herb Brown

Song

Fern Buchner

Makeup Artist

Randy Burke

Transportation Captain

Bobby Burns

Stunts

Mary Burton

Makeup Assistant

Jennifer Butler

Costumes

Liz Carlin

Assistant Sound Editor

John J Carr

Sound Editor

Oscar Castro-neves

Original Music

Joseph Chapman

Adr

Christopher Cibelli

Assistant Editor

Anne V. Coates

Editor

Ritchie Copenhaver

Assistant Location Manager

Julie B Crum

Other

Devon Curry

Adr Editor

Glenn Daniels

Casting

Sandy De Crescent

Music Contractor

Frank De Vol

Song

William Dean

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Jerry Deblau

Gaffer

Deborah Lamia Denevar

Hair Stylist

Leslie Dilley

Production Designer

Daren R. Dochterman

Visual Effects

Elizabeth J Donaldson

Other

Randy Downey

Other

David Dumais

Wardrobe Supervisor

David Dunlap

Camera Operator

Greg Finley

Adr

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Nancy Fogarty

Music Editor

Roger Fortune

Set Designer

Douglas Fox

Property Master

Arthur Freed

Song

Dennis Gamiello

Key Grip

James A Garrett

Assistant Editor

David Gillespie

Grip

Julie Lynn Glick

Costumes

Miles Goodman

Music

Javier Grajeda

Adr

David Grannis

Assistant Sound Editor

Romaine Greene

Hair Stylist

Robert Griffon

Property Master

Wendi Haas

Production Coordinator

Marvin Hamlisch

Song

Catherine Harper

Foley Artist

Barbara Harris

Adr

Scott Harris

Production Assistant

Richard Hazard

Song

Donald G Helderle

Foreman

Richard O Helmer

Special Effects Supervisor

James Hickox

Assistant Editor

Pieter Hubbard

Sound Editor

David J Hudson

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Rosanna Huffman

Adr

Gerry Hurtado

Song

Sandy Isaac

Post-Production Coordinator

Judy Jennings

Other

Carol Joffe

Set Decorator

Nils Johnson

Video Assist/Playback

Michael Steve Jones

Stunts

Marie A Kaderbeck

Costumes

Robert Kaiser

Color Timer

Susan V Kalinowski

Hair Stylist

Jack Kandel

Adr

Doc Kane

Adr Mixer

Lisa Kearsley

Production Coordinator

Jay Kemp

Other

Jim Kindelon

Stunts

Carlyle King

Adr

Craig Kohtala

Best Boy Grip

Jack Kohtala

Grip

Darlene Koldenhoven

Music Contractor

Daamen Krall

Adr

Marsha Kramer

Adr

Beth Kuhn

Art Director

Anne Kuljian

Set Decorator

Harry Leavey

Transportation Captain

Donald J. Lee

Assistant Director

Timothy Lee

Production Assistant

Marci Levine

Accounting Assistant

Kim Maitland

Boom Operator

Susan Malerstein-watkins

Script Supervisor

Bobby Mancuso

Assistant Camera Operator

Ken Mantlo

Boom Operator

Greg M Martin

Grip

Susan V Mcconnell

Assistant Production Coordinator

Charles H Mcintyre

Other

Mel Metcalfe

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Robert W Meyers

Rigging Gaffer

Emanuel Millar

Hair Stylist

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

Joel Moss

Music

Matthew W. Mungle

Makeup Artist

Frank Nieves

Foreman

Jennifer Ogden

Unit Production Manager

Robin Oz

Special Thanks To

Thomas Pasatieri

Music Arranger

Dorothy Pearl

Makeup

Hugo Pena

Costume Supervisor

Peter John Petraglia

Best Boy

Bill Phillips

Sound Editor

John Phillips

Sound Editor

Bernie Pollack

Costume Designer

Terry Porter

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Ronald J Pure

Other

David Randolph

Adr

Noreen Reardon

Adr

Ilyse A. Reutlinger

Assistant

Blair Richwood

Assistant

Stephani Ryan

Adr

John Sandau

Lighting

Hal Sanders

Sound Editor

Steven Sanderson

Camera Trainee

Jill Greenberg Sands

Casting Associate

Alvin Sargent

Story By

Alvin Sargent

From Story

Alvin Sargent

Creative Consultant

Ken Scaife

Construction Coordinator

Diana Schmidt

Assistant

Tom Schulman

Screenplay

Gary Schwartz

Adr

Sherwood Schwartz

Song

Adam P Scott

Apprentice

Dennis R. Scott

Stunt Coordinator

Vernon Scott

Adr

Scott Shadden

Assistant Sound Editor

James Skotchdopole

Assistant Director

Tandi Slater

Production Accountant

Edward Steidele

Foley Artist

Jim Sweeney

Transportation Captain

Larry Thomas

Other

James R Tynes

Lighting Technician

Gaston Veilleux

Transportation Coordinator

David M. Walsh

Photography

Robert Warwick

Sound Editor

Barry Wetcher

Photography

Ed White

Sound Mixer

Bernie Williams

Coproducer

Charles Williams

Special Thanks To

Dana Williams

Production Coordinator

Jane Williams

Special Thanks To

Susan J. Wright

Wardrobe Supervisor

Laura Ziskin

From Story

Laura Ziskin

Story By

Laura Ziskin

Screenplay

Laura Ziskin

Producer

Film Details

Also Known As
Hur mår Bob?, Quoi de neuf, Bob?
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Adventure
Black Comedy
Medical
Release Date
1991
Production Company
Andrew Adams
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
Smith Mountain Lake, Virginia, USA; New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 37m

Articles

What About Bob?


Benefiting from a first-and-only star pairing of Richard Dreyfuss and Bill Murray, the agreeable if not wholly politically correct family farce What About Bob? (1991) played to the particular comic strengths of its leads as an uptight psychotherapist and his intractable new patient, and proved a respectable $63 million spring hit for Disney in its theatrical run.

The overbearing psychiatrist Leo Melvin (Dreyfuss) is blessed with a successful Manhattan practice and a loving wife (Julie Hagerty) and kids (Charlie Korsmo, Kathryn Erbe) that he named after the Freuds, and whom he relates to with the same patronizing attitude he reserves for his clientele. Thrilled with the prospect that his forthcoming pop psychology book is getting a major push from its publisher, he's preparing to take the family on a month-long lakeside vacation in New England, where he can be interviewed by Good Morning America in relative peace.

Unfortunately, Leo hadn't counted on the tenacity of the hyper-dependent Bob Wiley (Murray), a recent referral from an exasperated colleague. Bob is a living cauldron of bizarre phobias, a man who left his wife for no other reason than she liked Neil Diamond and he didn't, and who literally has to lead himself by his own hand in order to be able to leave his apartment. Unwilling to face a month without access to his shrink, Bob wheedles the Melvins' vacation address from Leo's answering service, and, after requesting a fellow passenger to punch his lights out so he can get through the bus ride north, shows up at their door.

From there, the slapstick builds, as Leo tries to balance rational inveigling of Bob to go home with the urge to kill him, while his family takes to this gentle oddball who's able to engage them on a level the self-absorbed therapist never could. Even an attempt to commit Bob blows up in his face, as the institution deems him the sanest person they've ever encountered ("Roses are red, violets are blue, I'm a schizophrenic, and so am I!") Leo, of course, is a complete wreck by the time his coveted network moment rolls around, and it's Bob, of course, who helps him "deal" with the crisis.

"Don't be fooled by his on-screen attitude," director Frank Oz remarked in a 2003 profile on Murray for Entertainment Weekly. "He works hard and cares a great deal. He's not the easy, casual guy he often plays. Like most of us, he's not what he seems." Oz, the Muppeteer behind Miss Piggy, Fozzie and Yoda, proved the perfect fit to bring the stage musical Little Shop of Horrors (1986) to the screen, and has since been a dependable helmer of farces such as Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), In & Out (1997), Bowfinger (1999), and Death at a Funeral (2007). In a role for which Woody Allen and Patrick Stewart had been courted to play, Dreyfuss hits all the right notes in delineating the tumble of the arrogant and ultimately humbled headshrinker.

At the time he made What About Bob?, the 13-year-old Korsmo was in the midst of an incandescent run as one of Hollywood's most talked-about juvenile talents, as further evidenced by his acclaimed efforts in Men Don't Leave (1990), Dick Tracy (1990) and Hook (1991). The grounded, intelligent youngster decided soon after that he'd had his fill of show business, and his appearance in Can't Hardly Wait (1998) marked his only acting since. Korsmo managed a 4.0 GPA in earning his physics degree at MIT in 2002; after a few years holding various federal posts in Washington, he obtained a law degree from Yale.

The petite Erbe, a decade away from starting her successful run as Alexandra Eames on TV's Law and Order: Criminal Intent, made her screen debut here playing a teen at age 26; she was only 10 years younger than her screen mom Julie Hagerty.

Producer: Laura Ziskin
Director: Frank Oz
Screenplay: Tom Schulman; Alvin Sargent and Laura Ziskin (story)
Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus
Art Direction: Jack Blackman
Music: Miles Goodman
Film Editing: Anne V. Coates
Cast: Bill Murray (Bob 'Bobby' Wiley), Richard Dreyfuss (Dr. Leo Marvin), Julie Hagerty (Fay Marvin), Charlie Korsmo (Sigmund 'Siggy' Marvin), Kathryn Erbe (Anna Marvin), Tom Aldredge (Mr. Guttman), Susan Willis (Mrs. Guttman).
C-99m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Jay S. Steinberg
What About Bob?

What About Bob?

Benefiting from a first-and-only star pairing of Richard Dreyfuss and Bill Murray, the agreeable if not wholly politically correct family farce What About Bob? (1991) played to the particular comic strengths of its leads as an uptight psychotherapist and his intractable new patient, and proved a respectable $63 million spring hit for Disney in its theatrical run. The overbearing psychiatrist Leo Melvin (Dreyfuss) is blessed with a successful Manhattan practice and a loving wife (Julie Hagerty) and kids (Charlie Korsmo, Kathryn Erbe) that he named after the Freuds, and whom he relates to with the same patronizing attitude he reserves for his clientele. Thrilled with the prospect that his forthcoming pop psychology book is getting a major push from its publisher, he's preparing to take the family on a month-long lakeside vacation in New England, where he can be interviewed by Good Morning America in relative peace. Unfortunately, Leo hadn't counted on the tenacity of the hyper-dependent Bob Wiley (Murray), a recent referral from an exasperated colleague. Bob is a living cauldron of bizarre phobias, a man who left his wife for no other reason than she liked Neil Diamond and he didn't, and who literally has to lead himself by his own hand in order to be able to leave his apartment. Unwilling to face a month without access to his shrink, Bob wheedles the Melvins' vacation address from Leo's answering service, and, after requesting a fellow passenger to punch his lights out so he can get through the bus ride north, shows up at their door. From there, the slapstick builds, as Leo tries to balance rational inveigling of Bob to go home with the urge to kill him, while his family takes to this gentle oddball who's able to engage them on a level the self-absorbed therapist never could. Even an attempt to commit Bob blows up in his face, as the institution deems him the sanest person they've ever encountered ("Roses are red, violets are blue, I'm a schizophrenic, and so am I!") Leo, of course, is a complete wreck by the time his coveted network moment rolls around, and it's Bob, of course, who helps him "deal" with the crisis. "Don't be fooled by his on-screen attitude," director Frank Oz remarked in a 2003 profile on Murray for Entertainment Weekly. "He works hard and cares a great deal. He's not the easy, casual guy he often plays. Like most of us, he's not what he seems." Oz, the Muppeteer behind Miss Piggy, Fozzie and Yoda, proved the perfect fit to bring the stage musical Little Shop of Horrors (1986) to the screen, and has since been a dependable helmer of farces such as Dirty Rotten Scoundrels (1988), In & Out (1997), Bowfinger (1999), and Death at a Funeral (2007). In a role for which Woody Allen and Patrick Stewart had been courted to play, Dreyfuss hits all the right notes in delineating the tumble of the arrogant and ultimately humbled headshrinker. At the time he made What About Bob?, the 13-year-old Korsmo was in the midst of an incandescent run as one of Hollywood's most talked-about juvenile talents, as further evidenced by his acclaimed efforts in Men Don't Leave (1990), Dick Tracy (1990) and Hook (1991). The grounded, intelligent youngster decided soon after that he'd had his fill of show business, and his appearance in Can't Hardly Wait (1998) marked his only acting since. Korsmo managed a 4.0 GPA in earning his physics degree at MIT in 2002; after a few years holding various federal posts in Washington, he obtained a law degree from Yale. The petite Erbe, a decade away from starting her successful run as Alexandra Eames on TV's Law and Order: Criminal Intent, made her screen debut here playing a teen at age 26; she was only 10 years younger than her screen mom Julie Hagerty. Producer: Laura Ziskin Director: Frank Oz Screenplay: Tom Schulman; Alvin Sargent and Laura Ziskin (story) Cinematography: Michael Ballhaus Art Direction: Jack Blackman Music: Miles Goodman Film Editing: Anne V. Coates Cast: Bill Murray (Bob 'Bobby' Wiley), Richard Dreyfuss (Dr. Leo Marvin), Julie Hagerty (Fay Marvin), Charlie Korsmo (Sigmund 'Siggy' Marvin), Kathryn Erbe (Anna Marvin), Tom Aldredge (Mr. Guttman), Susan Willis (Mrs. Guttman). C-99m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States August 1991

Released in United States on Video November 6, 1991

Released in United States Spring May 17, 1991

Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund August 18-24, 1991.

Began shooting August 27, 1990.

Completed shooting November 21, 1990.

Initially a Robin Williams vehicle. Tom Hanks was once considered for a role.

Released in United States Spring May 17, 1991

Released in United States August 1991 (Shown at Norwegian Film Festival in Haugesund August 18-24, 1991.)

Released in United States on Video November 6, 1991