Mary Shelley's Frankenstein


2h 8m 1994

Brief Synopsis

A young scientist's attempts to create life lead to disaster when his monstrous creation comes after him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Frankenstein de Mary Shelley
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror/Science-Fiction
Adaptation
Drama
Horror
Period
Thriller
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom; Swiss Alps, Switzerland

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m

Synopsis

In this epic and romantic new version of the classic film, The Creature is driven to revenge when his master rejects him after giving him life.

Crew

John Abrahams

Dolly Grip

James Acheson

Costume Designer

Walter Aeberli

Other

Christine Allsop

Makeup Artist

Matthew Allwork

Camera

Jonathan Angell

Special Effects

David Appleby

Photography

Marion Appleton

Other

Linda Armstrong

Makeup Artist

Larry Ashmore

Original Music

Campbell Askew

Sound Editor

Don Banks

Boom Operator

Janice Barnes

Hair

David Barron

Unit Production Manager

David Barron

Associate Producer

John Bateman

Foley Mixer

Bernard Bellew

Assistant Director

Bruce Bigg

Property Master

Brian Bishop

Scenic Artist

Doug Bishop

Scenic Artist

Celia Bobak

Production

Michael Boone

Other

Linda Bowen

Accounting Assistant

Kenneth Branagh

Coproducer

Terry Bridle

Visual Effects

Jeremy Brookner

Video Assist/Playback

Fred Brown

Rigging Gaffer

Geoff R. Brown

Sound

Neil Brown

Assistant Camera Operator

Peter Butler

Dolly Grip

Robin Chambers

Assistant

Martin Childs

Art Director

Jane Clarke

Storyboard Artist

Jane Clive

Costume Department

Susan Coates

Costumes

Richard Conway

Visual Effects Supervisor

Lorraine Cooksley

Costumes

Trevor Coop

Camera Operator

Francis Ford Coppola

Producer

Mark Coulier

Prosthetic Makeup

Mark Coulier

Art Department

Simon Cozens

Assistant Editor

Simon Crane

Stunt Coordinator

Michael Crawley

Transportation Captain

Steve Crawley

Digital Effects Supervisor

Naomi Critcher

Costume Department

Desmond Crowe

Art Director

Darcey Crownshaw

Other

Hugh Cruttwell

Consultant

Kay Cutts

Animal Trainer

Frank Darabont

Screenplay

Tonia Davall

Music

Robert De Niro

Associate Producer

Steve Dent

Other

Patrick Doyle

Music

Dan Dray

Art Assistant

Paddy Eason

Visual Effects

David Eltham

Special Effects

Paul Engelen

Makeup Artist

Fred Evans

Art Department

Mike Evans

Assistant Camera Operator

John Falkener

Other

Neil Farrell

Special Effects

Joe Felix

Dolly Grip

John Fenner

Art Director

Chuck Finch

Gaffer

Barbra Flinder

Titles

Geoff Foster

Music

Barry Fowler

Other

Pauline Fowler

Art Department

Colin Fox

Other

Ueli Frei

Other

Andreas Fuchs

Other

Fred Fuchs

Executive Producer

Robert Gavin

Dialogue Editor

Betty Glasow

Hair Stylist

Leonhard Gmur

Production Manager

Debbie Gower

Makeup Assistant

Rob Green

Assistant Editor

Pauline Griffiths

Foley

Darrell Guyon

Special Effects

Graham Hall

Assistant Camera Operator

Stephen Hamilton

Digital Effects Supervisor

Sallie Hard

Assistant Director

James V Hart

Producer

Dan Harvey

Consultant

Tim Harvey

Production Designer

Gordon Hayman

Camera Operator

Stacey Haynes

Choreographer

Jane Headford

Other

Nick Heckstall-smith

Assistant Director

Carol Hemming

Hairdresser

Ilona Herman

Makeup

Lil Heyman

Assistant Production Coordinator

Richard Hooper

Other

Stuart Hopps

Choreographer

Ben Howarth

Assistant Director

Tony Hughes

Costumes

Paul Hulme

Music

Simon Hume

Assistant Camera Operator

Danny Hunter

Props

Jayne Issott

Office Runner

Priscilla John

Casting

Michael Jones

Other

Michele Jones

Other

Riad Karim

Art Department

Debbie Kaye

Other

Fiona Kebbell

Costumes

Andrew Kelly

Special Effects

Callum King

Makeup Assistant

Colin Kinnear

Other

Jeff Kleeman

Associate Producer

Kerry Kohler

Associate Editor

Melissa Lackersteen

Makeup Artist

Steph Lady

Screenplay

Neil Lamont

Assistant Art Director

Peter Lange

Special Effects

Deborah Lanser

Makeup Artist

Roger Lanser

Director Of Photography

Steven Lawrence

Assistant Art Director

Dave Lawson

Sound Effects

Dominic Lester

Rerecording

Dennis Lowe

Camera

Roz Lowrie

Editor

Clive Mackey

Assistant Camera Operator

Paolo Mantini

Hair Stylist

Andrew Marcus

Editor

Skip Margetts

Assistant Camera Operator

Gerard Mccann

Music Editor

Jonathan Mckinstry

Assistant Art Director

Billy Merrell

Best Boy

Enrst Michel

Other

Susan Midgley

Assistant Editor

Colin Miller

Sound Effects Editor

Nick Millington

Assistant

Nicholas Moore

Assistant Editor

Lulu Morgan

Effects Coordinator

Simon Moseley

Assistant Director

Allan Moss

Art Department

David Motta

Sound

Chris Munro

Sound Mixer

Julian Murray

Art Department

Mark Nelmes

Visual Effects

Chris Newman

Assistant Director

Williams Nik

Animatronics

Gary Nixon

Accounting Assistant

Nigel Nixon

Special Effects

Robin O'donoghue

Rerecording

Jim O'hare

Other

Steve Onions

Special Effects

John Palmer

Camera Operator

Robert Palmer

Assistant Camera Operator

Chris Pantor

Visual Effects

David Parfitt

Coproducer

Daniel Parker

Makeup

Dominic Parker

Visual Effects

Steve Paton

Special Effects

Ken Pattenden

Construction Manager

John Payne

Dolly Grip

Nick Penn

Assistant Camera Operator

Peter Pickering

Special Effects

Richard Pointing

Costume Supervisor

Roy Potter

Gaffer

Roger Pratt

Director Of Photography

Roy Prendergast

Music Editor

Iona Price

Production Coordinator

Terry Pritchard

Transportation Captain

Michael Redding

Construction Coordinator

Peter Robertson

Steadicam Operator

Kate Robinson

Steadicam Operator

Stuart Robinson

Special Effects

Maggie Rodford

Music Supervisor

Raymond Rose

Propman

Jaki Sale

Other

Mark Sale

Sound Editor

Josh Salzmann

Consultant

Helen Seery

Accounting Assistant

Lisa Shanley

Costumes

Roger Sharland

Video Assist/Playback

Ivan Sharrock

Sound Mixer

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Source Material (From Novel)

Paul Shersby

Unit Location Manager

Amber Sibley

Makeup Assistant

Andrew Smith

Special Effects

Michael Smith

Production Accountant

David Snell

Music Conductor

Ian Speed

Camera

Edward Stickley

Props

Richard Styles

Assistant Director

Graham Sutton

Foley Editor

Lucinda Syson

Casting Associate

Michelle Taylor

Makeup Assistant

Ann Taylor Cowan

Assistant Costume Designer

Tamar Thomas

Assistant

Gary Tomkins

Other

Bill Trent

Dialogue Editor

Michael Trent

Assistant Sound Editor

Petra Ullrich

Accountant

John Veitch

Producer

Melanie Viner Cuneo

Assistant Editor

Film Details

Also Known As
Frankenstein de Mary Shelley
MPAA Rating
R
Genre
Horror/Science-Fiction
Adaptation
Drama
Horror
Period
Thriller
Release Date
1994
Distribution Company
TriStar Pictures
Location
Shepperton Studios, Shepperton, Middlesex, England, United Kingdom; Swiss Alps, Switzerland

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 8m

Award Nominations

Best Makeup

1994
Paul Engelen

Articles

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein


In the early '90s, after strong critical praise and impressive receipts were generated by Francis Ford Coppola's stylized take on one of the great gothic horror staples, Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992), Sony Pictures was eager to have the filmmaker return to the same well for inspiration. Much as the powers-that-be at Universal had done sixty years prior, Coppola settled upon Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994) as a follow-up. While neither the artistic or financial success of the vampire movie was duplicated, the end result remains a compelling entertainment that's fairly faithful to both the narrative line and thematic concerns of the Shelley novel.

Coppola opted to only serve as producer on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. He chose instead to hand both the director's reins and title role to Kenneth Branagh, who'd been one of the most in-demand actor/directors of the period due chiefly to his vibrant realizations of Shakespeare in Henry V (1989) and Much Ado About Nothing (1993). Coppola also knew that for the role of the scientist's patchwork creation, he wanted to avoid the familiar look and tone of prior films and instead present, as did Shelley, a creature that could articulate its torment. While speculation for the casting ran from John Malkovich to Jeremy Irons to Gerard Depardieu, Coppola knew who he wanted-and was ultimately successful in convincing Robert De Niro that he was ideal for the part.

De Niro had been intrigued both by the movie's intent to hew to Shelley's text and by the challenge of playing Frankenstein's monster. "We wanted someone who could act through the make-up," Branagh recalled in Andy Dougan's Untouchable: A Biography of Robert De Niro (Thunder's Mouth Press). "We also wanted someone who could come up with a make-up which was not a mask or suit to hide behind. We very much wanted to see Robert De Niro's eyes, De Niro's soul - there and available."

For the requisite effect, Branagh turned to British make-up whiz Daniel Parker of Animated Extras, whose staff would procure an Oscar nomination for its thoughtful work in constructing De Niro's tragic appearance. "One complication is that, once revived, the Creature actually heals over the course of the film," Parker recounted for Dougan. "He starts off with open wounds which have no blood, but then the wounds become bloody, gradually close and the stitches fall out. By the end of the film these wounds have become scars, so that we had to create six different stages that involved either color changes or sculpting changes."

As Shelley had in her narrative, Branagh has his scientist mysteriously arrive in the wastes of the Arctic, where he is discovered by a sea expedition under the command of the obsessive Captain Walton (Aidan Quinn). In explaining his presence, he revisits the lavish upbringing he enjoyed courtesy of his prosperous physician father (Ian Holm) and the lifelong affection he held for Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter), the family ward. In a harrowing sequence, his beloved mother (Cherie Lunghi) dies giving birth to his younger brother, and a distraught Frankenstein vows to free mankind from the reach of death.

Having reached manhood, Frankenstein journeys to Ingolstadt to commence his medical studies, where his queries and arguments on resuscitation are shot down as blasphemous twaddle by an increasingly infuriated faculty. The sole exception is a Dr. Waldeman (John Cleese), who has covertly dabbled in these forbidden theories. Opportunity arises after Waldeman's murder at the hands of a beggar (De Niro); the vagrant is swiftly hanged for the crime in turn. Frankenstein gathers the teacher's research and the necessary "raw materials" to bring it to fruition.

While the ceaselessly kinetic visual style that Branagh brought to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein didn't really allow for shock to build, it worked to best effect in the lab sequence, creating a genuinely riveting interpretation of one of the most familiar episodes in horror cinema. The creature - birthed in a copper chamber filled with amniotic fluid and charged with the output of electric eels - soon escapes Frankenstein's lab and takes shelter in a family's barn, learning to grasp language as he observes them from afar. He soon comprehends enough to read Frankenstein's journal, and enraged with self-awareness, he hunts his creator to Geneva and begins taking bloody vengeance on Victor's family. The monster gives his maker an ultimatum: create a mate, or the carnage continues.

While thoughtfully played by all its principals, including Tom Hulce as Victor's school chum, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein did not meet the popular reception that greeted Coppola's Dracula opus. It's unfortunate, as Branagh actually pumped new life into the oft-told tale.

Producer: David Barron, Kenneth Branagh, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert De Niro, James V. Hart, Jeff Kleeman, David Parfitt, John Veitch
Director: Kenneth Branagh
Screenplay: Steph Lady, Frank Darabont
Cinematography: Roger Pratt
Film Editing: Andrew Marcus
Art Direction: Desmond Crowe, John Fenner
Music: Patrick Doyle
Cast: Robert De Niro (The Creature), Kenneth Branagh (Victor Frankenstein), Tom Hulce (Henry Clerval), Helena Bonham Carter (Elizabeth), Aidan Quinn (Ship Captain Walton), Ian Holm (Baron Frankenstein).
C-123m. Letterboxed.

by Jay S. Steinberg
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

In the early '90s, after strong critical praise and impressive receipts were generated by Francis Ford Coppola's stylized take on one of the great gothic horror staples, Bram Stoker's Dracula (1992), Sony Pictures was eager to have the filmmaker return to the same well for inspiration. Much as the powers-that-be at Universal had done sixty years prior, Coppola settled upon Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1994) as a follow-up. While neither the artistic or financial success of the vampire movie was duplicated, the end result remains a compelling entertainment that's fairly faithful to both the narrative line and thematic concerns of the Shelley novel. Coppola opted to only serve as producer on Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. He chose instead to hand both the director's reins and title role to Kenneth Branagh, who'd been one of the most in-demand actor/directors of the period due chiefly to his vibrant realizations of Shakespeare in Henry V (1989) and Much Ado About Nothing (1993). Coppola also knew that for the role of the scientist's patchwork creation, he wanted to avoid the familiar look and tone of prior films and instead present, as did Shelley, a creature that could articulate its torment. While speculation for the casting ran from John Malkovich to Jeremy Irons to Gerard Depardieu, Coppola knew who he wanted-and was ultimately successful in convincing Robert De Niro that he was ideal for the part. De Niro had been intrigued both by the movie's intent to hew to Shelley's text and by the challenge of playing Frankenstein's monster. "We wanted someone who could act through the make-up," Branagh recalled in Andy Dougan's Untouchable: A Biography of Robert De Niro (Thunder's Mouth Press). "We also wanted someone who could come up with a make-up which was not a mask or suit to hide behind. We very much wanted to see Robert De Niro's eyes, De Niro's soul - there and available." For the requisite effect, Branagh turned to British make-up whiz Daniel Parker of Animated Extras, whose staff would procure an Oscar nomination for its thoughtful work in constructing De Niro's tragic appearance. "One complication is that, once revived, the Creature actually heals over the course of the film," Parker recounted for Dougan. "He starts off with open wounds which have no blood, but then the wounds become bloody, gradually close and the stitches fall out. By the end of the film these wounds have become scars, so that we had to create six different stages that involved either color changes or sculpting changes." As Shelley had in her narrative, Branagh has his scientist mysteriously arrive in the wastes of the Arctic, where he is discovered by a sea expedition under the command of the obsessive Captain Walton (Aidan Quinn). In explaining his presence, he revisits the lavish upbringing he enjoyed courtesy of his prosperous physician father (Ian Holm) and the lifelong affection he held for Elizabeth (Helena Bonham Carter), the family ward. In a harrowing sequence, his beloved mother (Cherie Lunghi) dies giving birth to his younger brother, and a distraught Frankenstein vows to free mankind from the reach of death. Having reached manhood, Frankenstein journeys to Ingolstadt to commence his medical studies, where his queries and arguments on resuscitation are shot down as blasphemous twaddle by an increasingly infuriated faculty. The sole exception is a Dr. Waldeman (John Cleese), who has covertly dabbled in these forbidden theories. Opportunity arises after Waldeman's murder at the hands of a beggar (De Niro); the vagrant is swiftly hanged for the crime in turn. Frankenstein gathers the teacher's research and the necessary "raw materials" to bring it to fruition. While the ceaselessly kinetic visual style that Branagh brought to Mary Shelley's Frankenstein didn't really allow for shock to build, it worked to best effect in the lab sequence, creating a genuinely riveting interpretation of one of the most familiar episodes in horror cinema. The creature - birthed in a copper chamber filled with amniotic fluid and charged with the output of electric eels - soon escapes Frankenstein's lab and takes shelter in a family's barn, learning to grasp language as he observes them from afar. He soon comprehends enough to read Frankenstein's journal, and enraged with self-awareness, he hunts his creator to Geneva and begins taking bloody vengeance on Victor's family. The monster gives his maker an ultimatum: create a mate, or the carnage continues. While thoughtfully played by all its principals, including Tom Hulce as Victor's school chum, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein did not meet the popular reception that greeted Coppola's Dracula opus. It's unfortunate, as Branagh actually pumped new life into the oft-told tale. Producer: David Barron, Kenneth Branagh, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert De Niro, James V. Hart, Jeff Kleeman, David Parfitt, John Veitch Director: Kenneth Branagh Screenplay: Steph Lady, Frank Darabont Cinematography: Roger Pratt Film Editing: Andrew Marcus Art Direction: Desmond Crowe, John Fenner Music: Patrick Doyle Cast: Robert De Niro (The Creature), Kenneth Branagh (Victor Frankenstein), Tom Hulce (Henry Clerval), Helena Bonham Carter (Elizabeth), Aidan Quinn (Ship Captain Walton), Ian Holm (Baron Frankenstein). C-123m. Letterboxed. by Jay S. Steinberg

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Nominated for the 1994 British Academy of Film & Television Arts (BAFTA) Award for Best Production Design.

Nominated for the 1994 Golden Reel Award by the Motion Picture Sound Editors in the foreign film category.

Released in United States Fall November 4, 1994

Released in United States on Video May 9, 1995

Released in United States November 1994

Shown at London Film Festival November 3-20, 1994.

Completed shooting February 25, 1994.

Began shooting October 21, 1993.

Released in United States Fall November 4, 1994

Released in United States on Video May 9, 1995

Released in United States November 1994 (Shown at London Film Festival November 3-20, 1994.)