Places In The Heart


1h 51m 1984
Places In The Heart

Brief Synopsis

A farmer's widow fights to keep her land during the Depression.

Film Details

Also Known As
En un lugar del corazón
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 51m

Synopsis

After her sheriff husband is killed, a Texas woman tires to make ends meet for her family during the depression by raising cotton and taking in boarders, one of whom is a blind man.

Crew

Calvin Acord

Special Effects

Nestor Almendros

Director Of Photography

Clint Althouse

Boom Operator

Mary Ann Austin

Casting

Robert Benton

Screenplay

Barbara Blanchette

Extras Agent/Coordinator

Richard Brick

Production Manager

John Brittain

Production Assistant

Norman Buckley

Assistant Editor

Gene Callahan

Production Designer

Lou Cerborino

Sound Editor

Richard P. Cirincione

Supervising Sound Editor

Rachel Cline

Post-Production Coordinator

Randall Coleman

Assistant Sound Editor

Robert G Connors

Best Boy

Lynn Covey

Location Coordinator

Brian Cowden

Coordinator

Walter Crespo

Film Lab

Arlene Donovan

Producer

Jay Dranch

Adr Editor

David Dreyfuss

Assistant Director

Dick Dubuque

Production Auditor

Jack Eberhart

Property Master

David Evans-lombe

Production Assistant

Bran Ferren

Special Effects

Howard Feuer

Casting

Tom Fleischman

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Richard Friedlander

Sound Editor

Bob Hall

Assistant Camera

Michael Hausman

Executive Producer

Lindsey Hicks

Sound Editor

Derek R. Hill

Set Decorator

Beccie Hilliard

Assistant Production Coordinator

Bob Horne

Assistant Camera

Roger Irvin

Construction Coordinator

Michael Jacobi

Adr Editor

Ingrid Johanson

Production Coordinator

John Kander

Music

Rody Kent

Casting

Bruce Kitzmeyer

Assistant Sound Editor

Paul Leblanc

Hair

Sondra Lee

Consultant

Dan Lerner

Camera Operator

Lois Lipfield

Assistant

Carol Littleton

Editor

Sidney Z. Litwack

Art Director

James Maceo

Production Assistant

Mary Malin

Assistant

Lee Mayes

Location Manager

Roy Mcbride

Special Effects

Peter Mcguire

Assistant Property Master

Al Milligan

Transportation Captain

Bob Mills

Makeup Designer

Paul Nuckles

Stunt Coordinator

Bitty O'sullivan-smith

Assistant Sound Editor

Peter Odabashian

Sound Editor

Bruce Pearson

Color Timer

Philip C Pfeiffer

Photography

James Pilcher

Sound Mixer

Lee Poll

Set Decorator

Bobby Porter

Stunt Double

Robert Prate

Best Boy

Thomas Prate

Key Grip

James Pullen

Coordinator

Rich Quinlan

Gaffer

Anne Rapp

Script Supervisor

Don Reddy

Photography

Ken Rinker

Coordinator

Jeremy Ritzer

Casting

Fred Rosenberg

Assistant Sound Editor

Zade Rosenthal

Photography

Ann Roth

Costumes

Jill Savitt

Assistant Editor

Silvio Scarano

Costumer

Sharon Schaffer

Stunt Double

Mark Schotte

Location Coordinator

Mort Schwartz

Costumer

Stephen Shiekman

Video Playback

Howard Shore

Music Producer

Howard Shore

Music

Jeff Stern

Assistant Sound Editor

Yolanda Toussieng

Hair Stylist

Joel Tuber

Assistant Director

Barbara Tulliver

Assistant Editor

Henry Wolf

Titles

Rebecca Wood

Assistant Production Coordinator

Film Details

Also Known As
En un lugar del corazón
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 51m

Award Wins

Best Actress

1984
Sally Field

Best Original Screenplay

1984

Award Nominations

Best Costume Design

1984

Best Director

1984
Robert Benton

Best Picture

1984

Best Supporting Actor

1984
John Malkovich

Best Supporting Actress

1984
Lindsay Crouse

Articles

Places in the Heart


"You like me. You really like me." That's what most people remember about Sally Field's Best Actress acceptance speech for the film Places in the Heart (1984). While it's not far off, at least in spirit, from what Field said on the night of March 25, 1985 in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the line is actually a misquote. Like some other famous film lines, Casablanca's "play it again Sam," for example, what the audience thought it heard has replaced the original quote in our collective Hollywood memories.

The Places in the Heart award was actually Field's second Oscar® win. Her first Best Actress statuette came in 1979 for her role as mill worker/activist Norma Rae. Despite her success, Field apparently thought the first award was a fluke.

Field began her acting career in 1965 as TV's Gidget and a few years later appeared as The Flying Nun. But her perky image was confining and Field was eager to shed it, taking on roles like a junkie in the TV movie Maybe I'll Come Home In the Spring (1976) and taking it off for a nude scene in the feature film Stay Hungry (1975). At the same time, a TV career could also be limiting and many stars found it impossible to jump from the small screen to the big screen. But in 1976, Sally Field's television career came to a climax with an Emmy for her unforgettable portrayal of a mentally disturbed woman with sixteen personalities in Sybil. After that, Field spent most of her time on the big screen, beginning with her role in Smokey and the Bandit (1977), which co-stared off screen love interest Burt Reynolds.

A mix of movies followed, from Absence of Malice (1981) to Smokey and the Bandit II (1980). Nonetheless, Field was still unsure that she'd shaken her TV image. But in 1984, when casting Places in the Heart, writer/director Robert Benton had no doubts about Field's ability. Benton had based the film on his own Depression era childhood in Texas and thought Sally would be perfect as his widowed heroine. He defended her early work. "If Sally hadn't been so good in Gidget or the The Flying Nun, do you think anyone would remember her in those roles?"

In the end, Benton was right. Places in the Heart was nominated for seven Academy Awards®, including Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor for John Malkovich and Best Supporting Actress for Lindsay. And it won two awards - Best Original Screenplay for Benton and, of course, Best Actress for Field.

On award night, emotions got the better of Field who shook her head in disbelief upon hearing her name announced. She thanked Benton and the cast, then for the first time seemed to believe she deserved her success. "The first time I didn't feel it," she said in her acceptance speech. "But this time I feel it and I can't deny the fact you like me. Right now, you like me."

Director/Screenwriter: Robert Benton
Producer: Arlene Donovan
Cinematographer: Nestor Almendros
Composer: John Kander, Howard Shore
Editor: Carol Littleton
Production Designer: Gene Callahan
Art Director: Sydney Z. Litwack
Executive Producer: Michael Hausman
Set Designer: Derek R. Hill, Lee Poll
Costume Designer: Mary Malin, Ann Roth
Cast: Sally Field (Edna Spalding), Lindsay Crouse (Margaret Lomax), Ed Harris (Wayne Lomax), Amy Madigan (Viola Kelsey), John Malkovich (Mr. Will), Danny Glover (Moze).
C-113m. Letterboxed.

by Stephanie Thames

Places In The Heart

Places in the Heart

"You like me. You really like me." That's what most people remember about Sally Field's Best Actress acceptance speech for the film Places in the Heart (1984). While it's not far off, at least in spirit, from what Field said on the night of March 25, 1985 in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, the line is actually a misquote. Like some other famous film lines, Casablanca's "play it again Sam," for example, what the audience thought it heard has replaced the original quote in our collective Hollywood memories. The Places in the Heart award was actually Field's second Oscar® win. Her first Best Actress statuette came in 1979 for her role as mill worker/activist Norma Rae. Despite her success, Field apparently thought the first award was a fluke. Field began her acting career in 1965 as TV's Gidget and a few years later appeared as The Flying Nun. But her perky image was confining and Field was eager to shed it, taking on roles like a junkie in the TV movie Maybe I'll Come Home In the Spring (1976) and taking it off for a nude scene in the feature film Stay Hungry (1975). At the same time, a TV career could also be limiting and many stars found it impossible to jump from the small screen to the big screen. But in 1976, Sally Field's television career came to a climax with an Emmy for her unforgettable portrayal of a mentally disturbed woman with sixteen personalities in Sybil. After that, Field spent most of her time on the big screen, beginning with her role in Smokey and the Bandit (1977), which co-stared off screen love interest Burt Reynolds. A mix of movies followed, from Absence of Malice (1981) to Smokey and the Bandit II (1980). Nonetheless, Field was still unsure that she'd shaken her TV image. But in 1984, when casting Places in the Heart, writer/director Robert Benton had no doubts about Field's ability. Benton had based the film on his own Depression era childhood in Texas and thought Sally would be perfect as his widowed heroine. He defended her early work. "If Sally hadn't been so good in Gidget or the The Flying Nun, do you think anyone would remember her in those roles?" In the end, Benton was right. Places in the Heart was nominated for seven Academy Awards®, including Best Picture, Best Supporting Actor for John Malkovich and Best Supporting Actress for Lindsay. And it won two awards - Best Original Screenplay for Benton and, of course, Best Actress for Field. On award night, emotions got the better of Field who shook her head in disbelief upon hearing her name announced. She thanked Benton and the cast, then for the first time seemed to believe she deserved her success. "The first time I didn't feel it," she said in her acceptance speech. "But this time I feel it and I can't deny the fact you like me. Right now, you like me." Director/Screenwriter: Robert Benton Producer: Arlene Donovan Cinematographer: Nestor Almendros Composer: John Kander, Howard Shore Editor: Carol Littleton Production Designer: Gene Callahan Art Director: Sydney Z. Litwack Executive Producer: Michael Hausman Set Designer: Derek R. Hill, Lee Poll Costume Designer: Mary Malin, Ann Roth Cast: Sally Field (Edna Spalding), Lindsay Crouse (Margaret Lomax), Ed Harris (Wayne Lomax), Amy Madigan (Viola Kelsey), John Malkovich (Mr. Will), Danny Glover (Moze). C-113m. Letterboxed. by Stephanie Thames

Lane Smith (1936-2005)


Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69.

Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976).

In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984).

Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993).

For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob.

by Michael T. Toole

Lane Smith (1936-2005)

Lane Smith, a veteran character actor of stage, screen and television, and who was best known to modern viewers as Perry White on Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, died on June 13 at his Los Angeles home of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which is more commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69. Born in Memphis, Tennessee on April 29, 1936, Smith had a desire to act from a very young age. After a brief stint in the Army, he moved to New York to study at the Actors Studio and made his debut on off-Broadway debut in 1959. For the next 20 years, Smith was a staple of the New York stage before sinking his teeth into television: Kojak, The Rockford Files, Dallas; and small parts in big films: Rooster Cogburn (1975), Network (1976). In 1978, he moved to Los Angeles to focus on better film roles, and his toothy grin and southern drawl found him a niche in backwoods dramas: Resurrection (1980), Honeysuckle Rose (1980); and a prominent role as the feisty Mayor in the dated Cold War political yarn Red Dawn (1984). Smith returned to New York in 1984 and scored a hit on Broadway when he received a starring role in David Mamet's Glengarry Glen Ross and earned a drama desk award in the process. His breakthrough role for many critics and colleagues was his powerful turn as Richard Nixon in The Final Days (1989); a docudrama based on the book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. He earned a Golden Globe nomination for his spot-on portrayal of the fallen President, and his career picked up from there as parts in prominent Hollywood films came his way: Air America (1990), My Cousin Vinny, The Mighty Ducks (both 1992), and the Pauly Shore comedy Son in Law (1993). For all his dependable performances over the years, Smith wasn't a familiar presence to millions of viewers until he landed the plump role of Perry White, the editor of the Daily Planet in Superman: Lois and Clark which co-starred Dean Cain and Teri Hatcher (1993-1997). After that run, he gave a scorching performance as Reverend Jeremiah Brown in the teleplay Inherit the Wind (1999); and he appeared last in the miniseries Out of Order (2003). He is survived by his wife Debbie; and son, Rob. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Voted Best Supporting Actor (Malkovich) and One of the Year's Ten Best Films by the 1984 National Board of Review.

Voted Best Supporting Actor (Malkovich) by the 1984 National Sociaty of Film Critics.

Winner of the Best Director Prize at the 1985 Berlin Film Festival.

Released in United States 1985

Released in United States on Video September 1987

Released in United States September 1984

Released in United States Summer September 1, 1984

Shown at the Berlin 1985 International Film Festival.

Completed shooting July 1984.

Released in United States 1985 (Shown at the Berlin 1985 International Film Festival.)

Released in United States September 1984

Released in United States on Video September 1987

Released in United States Summer September 1, 1984