Ghoulies


1h 24m 1985
Ghoulies

Brief Synopsis

A young man's obsession with controlling demonic forces threatens all around him.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Release Date
1985

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Synopsis

A young man discovers he has the ability to conjur up satanic spirits.

Crew

Mac Ahlberg

Director Of Photography

Joey Alvarado

Electrician

Douglas B Arnold

Sound Mixer

Holly Austin

Negative Cutter

Charles Band

Executive Producer

Richard Band

Music Composer

Richard Band

Original Music

Rick Barker

Stunt Player

Anthony Barnao

Casting Director

Ken Beauchene

Sound Mixer

Luca Bercovici

Screenplay

Howard Berger

Mechanical Special Effects

Chris Biggs

Special Makeup Effects

Chris Biggs

Mechanical Special Effects

Danny Bilson

Assistant Camera

David Boyd

Assistant Camera

Kevin Brennan

Gaffer

Jeff Broadstreet

Set Production Assistant

G W Brown

Adr/Dialogue Editor

John Buechler

Character Designer

John Buechler

Special Makeup Effects

Lynn Buechler

Mechanical Special Effects

Everett Burrell

Mechanical Special Effects

Everett Burrell

Special Makeup Effects

Bennah Burton-blatt

Assistant

Ed Callahan

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Sheri Callan

Assistant Production Accountant

Rob Cantrell

Mechanical Special Effects

Rob Cantrell

Special Makeup Effects

Dennis Clark

Electrician

Kathie Clark

Costume Designer

Sandy Corner

Production Manager

Stephen Crawford

Electrician

Robert Dawson

Titles

Gordon Day

Sound Mixer

Jerry Day

Grip

Brian Dean

Grip

Duane Dell'amico

Security

Mitch Devane

Mechanical Special Effects

Mitch Devane

Special Makeup Effects

Don Diers

Production Assistant

Debra Dion

Associate Producer

Jim Drewry

Security

Rik Faigh

Electrician

Vladimir Ferkelman

Production Assistant

Douglas Fox

Property Master

Linda Lee Franklin

Stunt Player

Tony Friedkin

Photography

Kevin Galbraith

Electrician

Roger George

Pyrotechnics

Cathy Mickel Gibson

Accountant

Glen Glenn

Post-Production Sound

Walter Gorey

Boom Operator

Cleve Hall

Mechanical Special Effects

Kenneth Hall

Mechanical Special Effects

H Herrington

Electrician

Jeff Holder

Craft Service

Fela Johnson

Song

Fela Johnson

Song Performer

Roger Kelton

Special Effects

Tina Kline

Contact Lenses

James Knight

Assistant Editor

Richard Kocik

Office Production Assistant

Karen Kornbau

Art Director

John Kwiatkowski

Sound Effects Editor

Jefery Levy

Producer

Jefery Levy

Screenplay

Betsy Magruder

Assistant Director

Ray Maichen

Key Grip

Ray Maichen

Best Boy

Donn Markel

Makeup

Hugh Mccallum

Unit Production Manager

Ron Mccausland

Key Grip

Tim Mcginness

Best Boy

Tom Meshelski

Assistant Editor

Steve Meyer

Construction

Bob Minkler

Sound Mixer

Michael Molnar

Grip

William James Murray

Assistant Director

Ted Nicolaou

Editor

Jill Ohanneson

Costumer

Debbie Pinthus

Boom Operator

Johanna Ray

Casting

Frank Rehwaldt

Office Production Assistant

Lynda Rescia

Apprentice Editor

Sharron Reynolds

Script Supervisor

John Richards

Music Engineer

Andrew Roach

Electrician

Ian Scheibel

Props Assistant

Tom Scurry

Assistant Editor

Jay Sedrish

Production Accountant

Cynthia Sowder

Art Director

Ronnie Specter

Makeup

Debra Spidell

Office Production Assistant

Wayne Springfield

Production Designer

Judith Fiske Stockley

Contact Lenses

Michael Stocks

Grip

Wayne Stroud

Grip

Craig Talmy

Sound Effects

Vance Trussell

Electrician

John Vulich

Special Makeup Effects

John Vulich

Mechanical Special Effects

Shirley Walker

Original Music

Aron Warner

Production Coordinator

Stan Wetzel

Sound Mixer

Michael Wilson

Assistant Camera

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Horror
Release Date
1985

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 24m

Articles

Ghoulies


While Roger Corman has remained the defining name for B-movie fare in America since the 1950s, he has a close competitor in the longevity department whose name is known to a far more select group of film cultists: Charles Band. An independent film producer and director (a career following the path of his father, Albert), Band created his own production company in the early '70s and turned out a diverse string of modest drive-in hits like Laserblast (1978), Tourist Trap (1979), and Parasite (1982), while he also established a VHS home video label, Wizard Video, which specialized in horror imports and exploitation oddities. In 1985, Band set his sights a bit higher by going international with Italian financial and creative partners, which also afforded him the luxury of more impressive shooting locations. The resulting company, Empire Pictures, scored a major hit out of the gate with Re-Animator (1985), followed by other video and cable favorites such as Trancers (1985), Troll (1986), and TerrorVision (1986).

However, one film inspired by a recent Hollywood hit would prove to be one of their biggest theatrical and video hits: 1985's Ghoulies, a PG-13 monster film aimed at the same preteen demographic that made a smash out of the previous year's Gremlins. (The influence of the then-popular Garbage Pail Kids isn't too difficult to spot, either.) The film was originally planned under the title Beasties in 1983 with Band as director and future Oscar® winner and Parasite veteran Stan Winston handling effects, but scheduling demands instead prompted Band to inexplicably hand the directing reins over to first-time director Luca Bercovici, a New York-born actor (and also a Parasite alumnus) who still remains busy acting for films and television today.

Special effects and creature designs became the responsibility of John Carl Buechler, still a relatively new name from a trio of Roger Corman films (Sorceress and Android [both 1982] and Deathstalker, 1983) as well as portions of Empire's notoriously messy debut film, a semi-anthology fantasy from 1984 called The Dungeonmaster. Buechler quickly became a familiar name among the Fangoria crowd after the success of Ghoulies and worked on most of their horror and science fiction films for the next three years. He also earned directing duties on the next year's Troll (whose primary cultural contribution is introducing the character name "Harry Potter" into the vernacular), Cellar Dweller (1988), the troubled and heavily censored Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988), and the direct-to-video Ghoulies III: Ghoulies Go to College (1991). The effects team on Ghoulies also includes several names who would appear again in the genre many times including Kenneth J. Hall (future co-writer of Puppetmaster [1989] and director of the beloved 1987 VHS trash classic, Evil Spawn) and Howard Berger, now one of Hollywood's most in-demand make-up artists with credits including Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds (2009), Robert Rodriguez's Sin City (2005), and David Lynch's Mulholland Dr. (2001).

Speaking of Lynch, one of his most consistent character actors, the late Jack Nance, has a memorable role in Ghoulies as Wolfgang. A wide-eyed, fidgety presence, he was one of the final contenders for the lead role in The Graduate [1967] and was related by marriage to the family of Dick and Jerry Van Dyke. Nance didn't find cinematic immortality until several years later as the lead in Lynch's debut feature, the midnight hit Eraserhead (1976). He appeared in nearly every Lynch project on the big and small screens until his surprising death in 1996 due to head injuries sustained in a fight at a donut shop.

A number of scream queens pepper the cast of Ghoulies including Lisa Pelikan (star of 1978's killer snake film Jennifer and the screen's second Mattie Ross in the same year's made-for-TV version of True Grit). Also look for Bobbie Bresee (a much-touted, busty regular in horror magazines after starring in 1983's Mausoleum). However, the most familiar actress in the cast now is Mariska Hargitay, the daughter of Jayne Mansfield and Mickey Hargitay who went on to earn an Emmy starring in the still-running Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.

The music of Ghoulies also bears a special mention as it's one of Empire's more unusual patchwork creations. Much of the score was comprised of stock music from past Band productions, often written by his composer brother Richard, while the late composer Shirley Walker (who also wrote additional music on The Dungeonmaster) was brought in to fill in the gaps. Richard Band even contributed a small handful of new tracks, too, which were later released as part of a deluxe edition of his Re-Animator score on CD.

Much of Ghoulies' financial success can be easily attributed to its unforgettable ad campaign, which ranks with the previous year's Silent Night, Deadly Night as one of the decade's most eye-catching horror poster designs. The image of a ghoulie popping out of a toilet above the tagline "They'll Get You in the End" famously frustrated many peeved parents trying to toilet train their traumatized toddlers, and the VHS cover made it a hot title for many years to come. The PG-13 rating also proved to be a canny move (achieved by trimming a few quick seconds to appease the MPAA), and though it took three years for Ghoulies II (1988, this time directed by Albert Band) to hit the screen, some violence had to hit the cutting room floor once again. Subsequent ghoulies installments bore only a vague relationship to each other, with the much-derided last entry, Ghoulies IV [1994] from director Jim Wynorski, tossing in science fiction elements and leather kink for a decidedly R-rated end product.

Charles Band managed to keep the Empire Pictures flag flying for four more years after the release of Ghoulies, but the plunge in value of the Italian lire and the country's rapidly changing tax regulations forced an end to both Band's arrangement and most of the circumstances that had allowed Italian horror to flourish for the previous three decades. Band reestablished himself in the States again in 1989 with his most famous company, Full Moon, which still releases films to this day and over the course of two decades established numerous sub-labels to handle its non-creature feature output. Band's subsequent franchises like Puppet Master and Subspecies may be the ones that ensured his immortality in the history books of drive-in filmmaking, but Ghoulies was the one that made it all possible in the beginning.

Producer: Jefery Levy
Director: Luca Bercovici
Screenplay: Luca Bercovici, Jefery Levy
Cinematography: Mac Ahlberg
Art Direction: Wayne Springfield
Music: Richard Band, Shirley Walker
Film Editing: Ted Nicolaou
Cast: Peter Liapis (Jonathan Graves), Lisa Pelikan (Rebecca), Michael Des Barres (Malcolm Graves), Jack Nance (Wolfgang), Peter Risch (Grizzel), Tamara De Treaux (Greedigut), Scott Thomson (Mike), Ralph Seymour (Mark (Toad Boy)), Mariska Hargitay (Donna), Keith Joe Dick (Dick).
C-81m.

by Nathaniel Thompson
Ghoulies

Ghoulies

While Roger Corman has remained the defining name for B-movie fare in America since the 1950s, he has a close competitor in the longevity department whose name is known to a far more select group of film cultists: Charles Band. An independent film producer and director (a career following the path of his father, Albert), Band created his own production company in the early '70s and turned out a diverse string of modest drive-in hits like Laserblast (1978), Tourist Trap (1979), and Parasite (1982), while he also established a VHS home video label, Wizard Video, which specialized in horror imports and exploitation oddities. In 1985, Band set his sights a bit higher by going international with Italian financial and creative partners, which also afforded him the luxury of more impressive shooting locations. The resulting company, Empire Pictures, scored a major hit out of the gate with Re-Animator (1985), followed by other video and cable favorites such as Trancers (1985), Troll (1986), and TerrorVision (1986). However, one film inspired by a recent Hollywood hit would prove to be one of their biggest theatrical and video hits: 1985's Ghoulies, a PG-13 monster film aimed at the same preteen demographic that made a smash out of the previous year's Gremlins. (The influence of the then-popular Garbage Pail Kids isn't too difficult to spot, either.) The film was originally planned under the title Beasties in 1983 with Band as director and future Oscar® winner and Parasite veteran Stan Winston handling effects, but scheduling demands instead prompted Band to inexplicably hand the directing reins over to first-time director Luca Bercovici, a New York-born actor (and also a Parasite alumnus) who still remains busy acting for films and television today. Special effects and creature designs became the responsibility of John Carl Buechler, still a relatively new name from a trio of Roger Corman films (Sorceress and Android [both 1982] and Deathstalker, 1983) as well as portions of Empire's notoriously messy debut film, a semi-anthology fantasy from 1984 called The Dungeonmaster. Buechler quickly became a familiar name among the Fangoria crowd after the success of Ghoulies and worked on most of their horror and science fiction films for the next three years. He also earned directing duties on the next year's Troll (whose primary cultural contribution is introducing the character name "Harry Potter" into the vernacular), Cellar Dweller (1988), the troubled and heavily censored Friday the 13th Part VII: The New Blood (1988), and the direct-to-video Ghoulies III: Ghoulies Go to College (1991). The effects team on Ghoulies also includes several names who would appear again in the genre many times including Kenneth J. Hall (future co-writer of Puppetmaster [1989] and director of the beloved 1987 VHS trash classic, Evil Spawn) and Howard Berger, now one of Hollywood's most in-demand make-up artists with credits including Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds (2009), Robert Rodriguez's Sin City (2005), and David Lynch's Mulholland Dr. (2001). Speaking of Lynch, one of his most consistent character actors, the late Jack Nance, has a memorable role in Ghoulies as Wolfgang. A wide-eyed, fidgety presence, he was one of the final contenders for the lead role in The Graduate [1967] and was related by marriage to the family of Dick and Jerry Van Dyke. Nance didn't find cinematic immortality until several years later as the lead in Lynch's debut feature, the midnight hit Eraserhead (1976). He appeared in nearly every Lynch project on the big and small screens until his surprising death in 1996 due to head injuries sustained in a fight at a donut shop. A number of scream queens pepper the cast of Ghoulies including Lisa Pelikan (star of 1978's killer snake film Jennifer and the screen's second Mattie Ross in the same year's made-for-TV version of True Grit). Also look for Bobbie Bresee (a much-touted, busty regular in horror magazines after starring in 1983's Mausoleum). However, the most familiar actress in the cast now is Mariska Hargitay, the daughter of Jayne Mansfield and Mickey Hargitay who went on to earn an Emmy starring in the still-running Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. The music of Ghoulies also bears a special mention as it's one of Empire's more unusual patchwork creations. Much of the score was comprised of stock music from past Band productions, often written by his composer brother Richard, while the late composer Shirley Walker (who also wrote additional music on The Dungeonmaster) was brought in to fill in the gaps. Richard Band even contributed a small handful of new tracks, too, which were later released as part of a deluxe edition of his Re-Animator score on CD. Much of Ghoulies' financial success can be easily attributed to its unforgettable ad campaign, which ranks with the previous year's Silent Night, Deadly Night as one of the decade's most eye-catching horror poster designs. The image of a ghoulie popping out of a toilet above the tagline "They'll Get You in the End" famously frustrated many peeved parents trying to toilet train their traumatized toddlers, and the VHS cover made it a hot title for many years to come. The PG-13 rating also proved to be a canny move (achieved by trimming a few quick seconds to appease the MPAA), and though it took three years for Ghoulies II (1988, this time directed by Albert Band) to hit the screen, some violence had to hit the cutting room floor once again. Subsequent ghoulies installments bore only a vague relationship to each other, with the much-derided last entry, Ghoulies IV [1994] from director Jim Wynorski, tossing in science fiction elements and leather kink for a decidedly R-rated end product. Charles Band managed to keep the Empire Pictures flag flying for four more years after the release of Ghoulies, but the plunge in value of the Italian lire and the country's rapidly changing tax regulations forced an end to both Band's arrangement and most of the circumstances that had allowed Italian horror to flourish for the previous three decades. Band reestablished himself in the States again in 1989 with his most famous company, Full Moon, which still releases films to this day and over the course of two decades established numerous sub-labels to handle its non-creature feature output. Band's subsequent franchises like Puppet Master and Subspecies may be the ones that ensured his immortality in the history books of drive-in filmmaking, but Ghoulies was the one that made it all possible in the beginning. Producer: Jefery Levy Director: Luca Bercovici Screenplay: Luca Bercovici, Jefery Levy Cinematography: Mac Ahlberg Art Direction: Wayne Springfield Music: Richard Band, Shirley Walker Film Editing: Ted Nicolaou Cast: Peter Liapis (Jonathan Graves), Lisa Pelikan (Rebecca), Michael Des Barres (Malcolm Graves), Jack Nance (Wolfgang), Peter Risch (Grizzel), Tamara De Treaux (Greedigut), Scott Thomson (Mike), Ralph Seymour (Mark (Toad Boy)), Mariska Hargitay (Donna), Keith Joe Dick (Dick). C-81m. by Nathaniel Thompson

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 18, 1985

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States Winter January 18, 1985