Anthony Asquith


Director
Anthony Asquith

About

Also Known As
Asquith (Puffin)
Birth Place
London, England, GB
Born
November 09, 1902
Died
February 20, 1968

Biography

With H.G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw and others, Asquith founded London's Film Society in 1925, and after a filmmaking apprenticeship in Hollywood, returned to England as a director in 1928. Along with Alfred Hitchcock, he was considered a major force in the British cinema during the 1930s and 40s. Beginning with his directing debut, "Shooting Stars" (co-directed with A.V. Bramble; 1928)...

Bibliography

"'Puffin' Asquith"
R J Minney (1973)
"Anthony Asquith"
Peter Noble (1951)

Notes

Named a Commander of the Order of Al Merito della Republica in Italy.

Biography

With H.G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw and others, Asquith founded London's Film Society in 1925, and after a filmmaking apprenticeship in Hollywood, returned to England as a director in 1928. Along with Alfred Hitchcock, he was considered a major force in the British cinema during the 1930s and 40s. Beginning with his directing debut, "Shooting Stars" (co-directed with A.V. Bramble; 1928) which utilized experimental visual effects and "A Cottage on Dartmoor" (1929), a portrait of British life notable for its use of sound, Asquith became recognized for his tasteful, restrained and civilized quasi-documentary portraits of British life and manners.

With his superb film version of Shaw's "Pygmalion" (1938; co-directed with Leslie Howard), Asquith also began turning out expertly crafted theatrical adaptations, one of the finest of which is the delicious "The Importance of Being Earnest" (1952). From 1938 he began a profitable collaboration with playwright-screenwriter Terrence Rattigan, creating emotional studies of people under stress including, perhaps their finest joint work, "The Way to the Stars" (1945) as well as "The Winslow Boy" (1948), and "The Browning Version" (1950), and continuing through Asquith's last film, "The Yellow Rolls Royce" (1964). Son of liberal prime minister Lord Herbert Asquith.

Filmography

 

Director (Feature Film)

An Evening With The Royal Ballet (1965)
Director of "Les Sylphides" and "Aurora's Wedding"
The Yellow Rolls-Royce (1965)
Director
Two Living, One Dead (1964)
Director
The V.I.P.s (1963)
Director
Guns of Darkness (1962)
Director
The Millionairess (1961)
Director
Libel (1959)
Director
The Doctor's Dilemma (1959)
Director
Orders to Kill (1958)
Director
On Such a Night (1955)
Director
Carrington V.C. (1954)
Director
The Young Lovers (1954)
Director
The Net (1953)
Director
The Final Test (1953)
Director
The Importance Of Being Earnest (1952)
Director
The Browning Version (1951)
Director
The Woman in Question (1950)
Director
The Winslow Boy (1948)
Director
While the Sun Shines (1947)
Director
The Way to the Stars (1945)
Director
Fanny By Gaslight (1944)
Director
We Dive at Dawn (1943)
Director
Demi-Paradise (1943)
Director
Uncensored (1942)
Director
Cottage to Let (1941)
Director
French Without Tears (1940)
Director
Pygmalion (1939)
Director
I Stand Condemned (1936)
Director
The Unfinished Symphony (1935)
Supervisor of English version
Dance Pretty Lady (1932)
Director
Tell England (1931)
Director
A Cottage on Dartmoor (1929)
Director
The Runaway Princess (1929)
Director
Shooting Stars (1927)
Director

Assistant Direction (Feature Film)

Boadicea (1928)
Assistant Director

Cast (Feature Film)

A Cottage on Dartmoor (1929)
Bespectacled Man In Cinema

Writer (Feature Film)

The Importance Of Being Earnest (1952)
Screenwriter
Letting in the Sunshine (1933)
Screenwriter
Dance Pretty Lady (1932)
Adaptation
Marry Me (1932)
Screenwriter
Dance Pretty Lady (1932)
Screenwriter
A Cottage on Dartmoor (1929)
Screenwriter
The Runaway Princess (1929)
Screenwriter
Shooting Stars (1927)
From Story
Shooting Stars (1927)
Screenwriter

Editing (Feature Film)

Shooting Stars (1927)
Editor

Life Events

1925

Co-founded Film Society

1926

Went to Hollywood to study filmmaking methods

1928

Returned to England to assist Sinclair Hall on film, "Boadicea"

1928

First film as co-director (with A.V. Bramble), "Shooting Stars" (also screenwriter and editor)

1928

Solo film directing debut, "Underground"

1930

Co-directed (with Geoffrey Barkas) first sound film, "Tell England"

1937

Became first president of Association of Cinematographic Technicians

1939

First collaboration with Terrence Rattigan, filming his play, "French Without Tears"

1945

Formed International Screenplays with Terrence Rattigan and Anatole de Grunwald

Videos

Movie Clip

Yellow Rolls Royce, The (1964) - You Should Refuse Me More Brit nobleman Charles (Rex Harrison) returns home (exteriors of the famous Cliveden house) for a weekend of socializing and horses to wife Eloise (Jeanne Moreau), in the first episode from The Yellow Rolls Royce, 1964, directed by Anthony Asquith.
Yellow Rolls Royce, The (1964) - We Have Nothing Armor-Plated Beginning the second of three stories linked by the car, we meet American gangster Paolo (George C. Scott), his aide (Art Carney) and moll Mae (Shirley MacLaine), greeted by a salesman (Riccardo Garrone ) in Genoa, in The Yellow Rolls Royce. 1964.
Yellow Rolls-Royce, The (1964) - A Shakespeare, A Tolstoy And A Toothbrush At Trieste, 1941, Ingrid Bergman as international society widow Mrs. Millett has just purchased the car of the title, with her aide Hortense (Joyce Grenfell), their discussion of their trip to turbulent Yugoslavia overheard by handsome Davich (Omar Sharif), the third story in The Yellow Rolls-Royce. 1964.
V.I.P.s, The (1963) - What Lives You Tycoons Lead Introducing the last of the above-the-title stars, Maggie Smith as the assistant to Rod Taylor as self-deprecating Australian industrialist Les Mangrum, Richard Wattis as the obsequious airline manager, all from Terence Rattigan’s original script, Anthony Asquith directing, in The V.I.P.s, 1963.
V.I.P.s, The (1963) - Opening Credits There’s a hint of irony and some achievement in the credits for the MGM all-star drama, Anthony Asquith directing as we meet Liz and Dick (Taylor And Burton), Orson Welles, Louis Jourdan, Elsa Martinelli, Rod Taylor, Maggie Smith and Academy Award-winner Margaret Rutherford, in The V.I.P.s, 1963.
V.I.P.s, The (1963) - Through The Common Herd First scene for top-billed Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton as jet setters Frances and Paul Andros, Dennis Price his assistant Millbank, Richard Wattis the airline manager, bumping (not incidentally, it will transpire) into bon vivant friend Marc (Louis Jourdan), early in The V.I.P.s, 1963.
V.I.P.s, The (1963) - Room With No View Joining in the premise-setting, Richard Wattis as B.O.A.C. official Sanders, Orson Welles as movie director Buda, Elsa Martinelli his latest discovery, Martin Miller his money man, then Margaret Rutherford in her Academy Award-winning role as Duchess Brighton, in The V.I.P.s, 1963.
Doctor's Dilemma, The (1958) - Surgeons Are The Worst Opening narration by Felix Aylmer, whom we’ll learn is London psychologist Sir Patrick Cullen, ruminating about medicine as he visits his suddenly famous friend Dr. Ridgeon (John Robinson), Anthony Asquith directing from the Bernard Shaw play, in The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1959.
Doctor's Dilemma, The (1958) - They Daren't Be Ill Dr. Colenso Ridgeon (John Robinson) with colleagues congratulating him on his knighthood, poor Blenkinsop (Michael Gwynn) joins prosperous Sir Ralph, Walpole and Sir Patrick (Robert Morley, Alastair Sim, Felix Aylmer), in The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1959, from the George Bernard Shaw play, starring Leslie Caron and Dirk Bogarde.
Doctor's Dilemma, The (1958) - Intemperate, Disheveled, Dissolute Invited to dine by Ridgeon (John Robinson) and fellow doctors (Robert Morley, Alastair Sim et al) to assess his worthiness for a cure, consumptive artist Dubedat (Dirk Bogarde) and wife (Leslie Caron) appear to pass muster, in The Doctor’s Dilemma, 1958, from the Bernard Shaw play.
Guns Of Darkness (1962) - Just An Old English Custom With a New Year’s midnight coup brewing in a fictional South American republic, British sugar firm boss Bryant (James Robertson Justice) parties with spooky local Hernandez (Derek Godfrey) and his own unruly P-R man Jordan (David Niven) and wife (Leslie Caron), early in Guns Of Darkness, 1962.
Guns Of Darkness (1962) - You Must Feel Strongly Jordan (David Niven), the British corporate P-R man stationed in remote South America, has unintentionally taken in the wounded newly-ousted president (David Opatoshu), leaving him without time for his already justifiably angered wife (Leslie Caron) in Guns Of Darkness, 1962.

Trailer

Family

Herbert Asquith
Father
Politician. Served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1908 to 1916.
Margot Tennant
Mother
Second wife of Herbert Asquith.
Helena Bonham Carter
Great-Niece
Actor.

Bibliography

"'Puffin' Asquith"
R J Minney (1973)
"Anthony Asquith"
Peter Noble (1951)

Notes

Named a Commander of the Order of Al Merito della Republica in Italy.