Ian Fleming


Biography

Life Events

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Movie Clip

Live And Let Die (1973) - Nothing About My Future? Entering a Harlem restaurant (called “Fillet Of Soul”) gently pursuing possible cohorts of a suspicious Caribbean dictator, James Bond (Roger Moore) is snatched, meeting soothsayer Solitare (Jane Seymour), goon Tee Hee (Julius Harris), and the gangster “Mr. Big,” early in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Did You Mess With That? SPOILER here in Yaphet Kotto’s Bond-villain performance, captured Bond (Roger Moore) is interrogated by Mr. Big, who wants to know whether he’s despoiled Solitare (Jane Seymour) and thereby destroyed her psychic powers, meanwhile discussing his own links to the mysterious dictator Kananga, in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - She Had The Power And Lost It Yaphet Kotto as still largely mysterious Caribbean dictator Dr. Kananga is pressing his resplendent tarot card reader Solitare (Jane Seymour) about recent failures in her prognostications about Bond (Roger Moore, in his first performance, in the 8th 007 feature), who is on an aerial stake-out with colleague Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - The Man Who Shares My Hairbrush In fictional San Monique, bumbling but decorative novice CIA operative Rosie (ex-model and Playboy “bunny” Gloria Hendry) joins Bond (Roger Moore, in his first portrayal of 007) hiring a boat to visit the dictator’s private island, captained by Quarrel (Roy Stewart), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
Live And Let Die (1973) - Title Song, Insomnia, Sir? After three murders (of not-too-dashing likely-English guys) in the prologue, the title song by Paul & Linda McCartney, produced by George Martin, (which went to #2 on the Billboard U.S. chart, becoming by-far the most successful Bond theme ever) followed by M (Bernard Lee) intruding on 007 (Roger Moore, in his first appearance in the role) and a paramour (Madeline Smith), in Live And Let Die, 1973.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - A Location Fix On Double-O-Seven M and Q and Moneypenny (Bernard Lee, Desmond Llewelyn and Lois Maxwell) express concern about 007, then we find him (George Lazenby, the first-ever new James Bond, in his Aston-Martin) pursuing Diana Rigg (as Teresa “Tracy” Draco in a Mercury) on the Portugese coast, opening On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - Do Not Kill Me, Mr. Bond Abducted from a Portugese seaside resort by thugs reporting to European union-syndicate godfather Marc-Ange Draco (Gabriele Ferzetti), whose daughter (Diana Rigg) is his latest conquest, Bond (George Lazenby, in his first and only appearance as 007) frees himself to make inquiries, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - I Suspect They're Trying To Kill Me His false identity blown, trying to evade Blofeld’s thugs (Ilse Steppat et al), James Bond (George Lazenby) sneaks about the carnival at Lauterbrunnen (more precisley, Murren-Schilthorn, Switzerland), when he’s rescued by Tracy (a.k.a. Contessa Teresa, Diana Rigg), whom we haven’t seen for ages, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - Teresa Was A Saint On the evening following their mysterious opening encounter on the beach, George Lazenby as James Bond (establishing himself with some baccarat chemin-de-fer in his first appearance in the role) again gets to rescue Diana Rigg as Teresa or, as she’ll explain, Tracy, in the sixth 007 feature, On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - You Never Do Anything With Me On his first trip to HQ in London in his only appearance as James Bond, George Lazenby nails the hat-toss, jousts with Moneypenny (Lois Maxwell) and M (Bernard Lee), and reaches an excellent outcome, and an opportunity to pursue Blofeld, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) - A Well-Known Congenital Distinction Complexity as Bond (George Lazenby), escorted by Yuri Borienko deeper into the secret Swiss Alpine lair, knows he’s visiting the real Blofeld (Telly Savalas), who doesn’t yet know Bond isn’t the real genealogist Sir Hilary, come to consider his claim to a French noble title, in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969.
Diamonds Are Forever (1971) - Title Song, Plain Solid Work After an extensive action prologue, in which 007 apparently killed Blofeld, Shirley Bassey’s vocal for the title song by John Barry and Don Black, and Sean Connery as Bond appears to lack interest in more routine work, involving diamonds, explained by M (Bernard Lee), in Diamonds Are Forever, 1971.

Trailer

Man With The Golden Gun, The (1974) -- (Original Trailer) A particularly literal representation of the title, in the trailer for the 9th James Bond feature, Roger Moore’s second appearance, with Christopher Lee as scary Scaramanga, and somewhat dual Bond-girls, Maud Adams and Britt Ekland, in The Man With The Golden Gun, 1974.
Live And Let Die (1973) -- (Original Trailer) Fans today might forget that Jane Seymour was “introduced” as a Bond girl in the eighth feature in the series, with Roger Moore in his first outing, and Yaphet Kotto the chief villain, with no trace in the trailer of the hit theme song by Paul & Linda McCartney and Wings, from Live And Let Die, 1973.
On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) -- (Original Trailer) There’s a case to be made that the producers overshot the mark in compensating for the absence of Sean Connery, in the sixth James Bond feature, giving George Lazenby possibly more promotion than he needed, in the ever-reëvaluated On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, 1969, with Diana Rigg and Telly Savalas.
Goldfinger (1964) -- (Original Trailer) United Artists and producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli’s trailer for the hit third James Bond feature, starring Sean Connery, with Honor Blackman as Pussy Galore, Harold Sakata as Oddjob, and Gert Fröbe as the title character, in Goldfinger, 1964.
You Only Live Twice (1967) -- (Original Trailer) Sean Connery as James Bond winds up in Japan, investigating a space hijacking, in the fifth 007 feature from producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli, You Only Live Twice, 1967, with Akiko Wakabayashi.
Thunderball (1965) -- (Original Trailer) Sean Connery as 007 winds up chasing nuclear bombs in the Bahamas, Terence Young directing, Claudine Auger as Domino, and Adolfo Celi as the villain Largo, in the fourth and biggest-yet James Bond feature, Thunderball, 1965.
Dr. No (1963) -- (Original Trailer) For the first James Bond feature, the original trailer, from United Artists, producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. “Cubby” Broccoli and director Terence Young, starring Sean Connery and Ursula Andress, Dr. No, 1963.

Bibliography