Don Dubbins


Don Dubbins

Biography

Debuting onscreen as the bugle boy of Company "G" in the 1953 Oscar-winning classic "From Here to Eternity," Brooklyn-born actor Don Dubbins enjoyed a quick rise to A-list leading roles opposite Hollywood heavy hitters like James Cagney and Joseph Cotten. The flaxen-haired young performer was tapped by Cagney to be his costar in a pair of '56 features, the drama "These Wilder Years" and ...

Biography

Debuting onscreen as the bugle boy of Company "G" in the 1953 Oscar-winning classic "From Here to Eternity," Brooklyn-born actor Don Dubbins enjoyed a quick rise to A-list leading roles opposite Hollywood heavy hitters like James Cagney and Joseph Cotten. The flaxen-haired young performer was tapped by Cagney to be his costar in a pair of '56 features, the drama "These Wilder Years" and the Western "Tribute to a Bad Man," in which Dubbins played an honorable ranch hand who nevertheless falls for ranch boss Cagney's woman. The actor, who was often cast in military roles, next appeared in the boot-camp drama "The D.I." as a gutless Marine private driven relentlessly by his take-no-prisoners drill instructor, played by "Dragnet 1967" star Jack Webb, who also directed the picture. Webb's popular crime series provided just one of Dubbins's countless television guest-starring and supporting roles; he memorably appeared in the startling '60 "Elegy" episode of "Twilight Zone," as one of a trio of astronauts marooned on a strange still-life planet. Dubbins worked practically non-stop on television for the next three decades, interrupting his run of small-screen doctors and diplomats with only the rare feature portrayal, in films like the sci-fi adventure "From the Earth to the Moon" and the mind-bending Ray Bradbury adaptation "The Illustrated Man."

Life Events

Videos

Movie Clip

Tribute To A Bad Man (1956) - Saved By A Grocery Clerk Joining the opening narration by Don Dubbins as tenderfoot "Steve Miller," meeting the titular James Cagney as "Jeremy Rodock," southeast Wyoming, 1875, in Tribute To A Bad Man, 1956, directed by Robert Wise, photographed by Robert Surtees.
Tribute To A Bad Man (1956) - Don't Pretend With Me Stranger Steve (Don Dubbins) awakens after having brought the injured title character (James Cagney, not seen) back to his ranch, surprised to meet Greek Jo (Irene Papas, her first scene), in director Robert Wise's Tribute To A Bad Man, 1956.
Tribute To A Bad Man (1956) - You Get Hanging Fever First a shot with Don Dubbins which director Robert Wise surely grabbed just for the rainbow, then ranch hand McNulty (Stephen McNally) and boss Rodock (James Cagney, title character) prepare to dispense frontier justice, his live-in Jo (Irene Papas) objecting, in Tribute To A Bad Man, 1956.
Enchanted Island (1958) - You Don't Find Cannibals That Pretty Dana Andrews as sailor Abner, fleeing a vengeful captain in the South Seas circa 1842, wraps this with a line probably not from the original Herman Melville novel as, with injured buddy Tom (Don Dubbins) they pursue native Fayaway (Jane Powell), her first scene, in Enchanted Island, 1958.
Enchanted Island (1958) - The Wind Stinks Of Sin Allan Dwan opens his final film, on location on the Mexican Pacific coast, from Herman Melville's novel Typee, introducing sailors Dana Andrews and Don Dubbins, island pimp Arthur Shields, officer Les Hellman and Ted de Corsia their cruel captain, in Enchanted Island, 1958, also starring Jane Powell.
D.I., The (1957) - Pain In Your Head Opening from producer, director and star Jack Webb, as Sergeant Moore, working over several marine privates finishing with Owens (Don Dubbins), in The D.I., 1957, screenplay by James Lee Barrett from his original play and teleplay.
D.I., The (1957) - General Orders Sergeant Moore (producer and director Jack Webb) debriefing troublesome marine Owens (Don Dubbins), then conferring with colleague O'Neil (actual marine Corporal John R. Brown), in The D.I., 1957
D.I., The (1957) - We'd All Be Dead! The crux of the story, producer, director and star Jack Webb as Sergeant Moore, berating his charges over a mistake made by Owens (Don Dubbins) in training, in The D.I., 1957, previously produced on television as The Murder Of A Sand Flea.

Bibliography