Clash of the Titans


1h 58m 1981
Clash of the Titans

Brief Synopsis

A Greek hero fights a series of monsters, including the dreaded gorgon, to win the woman he loves.

Film Details

Also Known As
Furia de titanes, Gudarnas krig
MPAA Rating
Genre
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1981
Production Company
Camera Effects; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Metrocolor; Titan Productions
Distribution Company
Cic Video; United Artists Films
Location
Italy; Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Synopsis

A Greek hero fights a series of monsters, including the dreaded gorgon, to win the woman he loves.

Crew

Steven Archer

Assistant

Colin Arthur

Costumes

Dennis Bartlett

Special Effects Technician

Mike Bulley

Loader

Colin Chilvers

Models

Sam Christensen

Casting

Robin Clarke

Music Editor

Bryan Coates

Location Manager

Harry Cordwell

Set Dresser

Beverley Cross

Screenwriter

Robert Cross

Construction Manager

Cliff Culley

Special Miniatures

Jim Danforth

Assistant

Keith Denny

Wardrobe Supervisor

Giorgio Desideri

Art Direction

Roy Field

Titles And Opticals

Tony Gaudioz

Camera Focus Puller

Gerry Gavigan

Assistant Director

Timothy Gee

Editor

Helen Gill

Wardrobe

Fernando Gonzalez

Art Direction

Robin Gregory

Sound Mixer

Keith Hamshere

Stills

Ray Harryhausen

Producer

Ray Harryhausen

Special Visual Effects

Graham V Hartstone

Dubbing Mixer

Peter Howitt

Art Direction

Stephanie Kaye

Hair Stylist

Irene Lamb

Casting

Nicolas Lemessurier

Dubbing Mixer

David Lusby

Production

Terry Madden

Assistant Director

John May

Electrician

Gordon K. Mccallum

Dubbing Mixer

Bill Mclaren

Construction Manager

Ted Moore

Dp/Cinematographer

Ted Moore

Director Of Photography

Basil Newall

Makeup

John Palmer

Associate Producer

Don Picton

Art Direction

Mario Pisani

Production Supervisor (Italy)

Ferdinando Poggi

Stunt Coordinator

Nando Poggi

Stunt Coordinator

Emma Porteous

Costume Designer

Terry Poulton

Sound Effects Editor

Connie Reeve

Makeup

Luis Roberts

Production Supervisor (Spain)

Michael Roberts

Camera Operator

Joyce Robinson

Casting

Laurence Rosenthal

Music

Charles H. Schneer

Producer

Terry Sharratt

Boom Operator

Brian Smithies

Animatronics

Doreen Soan

Continuity

Herbert Spencer

Original Music

Jimmy Spoard

Grip

Janet Stevens

Models

Ann Tasker

Unit Publicist

Chris Thompson

Assistant Editor

Frank Van Der Veer

Titles And Opticals

Anthony Waye

Assistant Director

Frank White

Production Designer

Egil Woxholt

Camera

Photo Collections

Clash of the Titans - Lobby Card Set
Here is a set of Lobby Cards from Clash of the Titans (1981). Lobby Cards were 11" x 14" posters that came in sets of 8. As the name implies, they were most often displayed in movie theater lobbies, to advertise current or coming attractions.

Videos

Movie Clip

Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Cerberus Perseus (Harry Hamlin) on his quest with helmeted helpers comes across what appears to be a two-headed version of the three-headed Greek myth dog the Cerberus, in Clash Of The Titans, 1981, effects by Ray Harryhausen.
Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Last Of The Winged Horses Faced with the challenge of having to track a giant vulture, Perseus (Harry Hamlin) and his mystical poet pal Ammon (Burgess Meredith) sneak up and capture that last flying horse Pegasus (the others were killed by a rival of Zeus), so a big technical sequence for special effects giant Ray Harryhausen, in Clash Of The Titans 1981.
Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Opening, Bear Witness Zeus! Opening and ceremonial, from the Ray Harryhausen showcase, starring Harry Hamlin, Burgess Meredith, Laurence Olivier and Ursula Andress, with Donald Houston as aggrieved king Acrisius, Vida Taylor his daughter, appealing to the big guy (whom we will learn is Olivier), in MGM’s Clash Of The Titans 1981.
Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Let Loose The Kraken! Exposition and a quick roll call on Olympus, Laurence Olivier as Zeus angered by actions on earth, consulting Claire Bloom, Maggie Smith, Susan Fleetwood and Ursula Andress (Hera, Thetis, Athena and Aphrodite) then instructing Poseidon (Jack Gwillim) to undertake revenge, early in Clash Of The Titans 1981.
Clash Of The Titans (1981) - Gift From The Gods Perseus (Harry Hamlin) has been working out with his sword when he and Ammon (Burgess Meredith) are alerted to fine weapons and an initially muffled Zeus (Laurence Olivier), with a message, in Clash Of The Titans, 1981.

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
Furia de titanes, Gudarnas krig
MPAA Rating
Genre
Adventure
Fantasy
Release Date
1981
Production Company
Camera Effects; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Metrocolor; Titan Productions
Distribution Company
Cic Video; United Artists Films
Location
Italy; Spain

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 58m

Articles

Clash of the Titans


For better or worse, Ray Harryhausen, the visual wizard behind the mythological spectacle Clash of the Titans (1981), is the father of modern special effects pictures. George Lucas and his Industrial Light and Magic team may have perfected this sort of thing with Star Wars (1977) (which has reached the level of overkill with the recent Lord of the Rings epics) but Harryhausen was the first effects wizard whose name was uttered with reverence by fantasy aficionados around the world. You knew what you were getting with a Harryhausen stop-action film, and he was more than happy to deliver it.

The main difference between Harryhausen and Lucas, of course, was that Harryhausen was working well before the dawn of computer animation and huge budgets (due to lack of money, his giant octopus in It Came from Beneath the Sea (1955) had only five arms, instead of eight). Harryhausen's brand of magic was produced through sweat - his creatures were moved inch by inch, then photographed frame by frame to create the illusion of life. Monumental patience was crucial to his success.

In many ways, Clash of the Titans is best suited for children, though the by-now quaint nature of its effects should delight movie fans of all ages. Harryhausen's previous ventures, such as Jason and the Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1974), were unusually inventive but just as equally hamstrung by weak casting and wooden performances. So the producers aimed higher with Clash of the Titans. It features a stellar cast of actors, many of them famous for their stage work in Shakespearean productions. Here they're playing toga-clad second bananas to Harryhausen's fantastical creations. But that's part of the fun.

In an interview with Dan Scapperotti for Cinefantastique magazine, screenwriter Beverly Cross recalled, "I had the idea for Clash of the Titans in 1969 while I was living in Greece, on an island called Skiathos. It's very close to Seriphos, the island where legend has it that Perseus, the son of Zeus, was washed ashore in a trunk." In the movie, Harry Hamlin plays Perseus and fights an assortment of outlandish creatures in an attempt to save the beautiful Princess Andromeda (Judi Bowker). Zeus (Laurence Olivier) gazes down from the heavens while Perseus goes toe-to-toe with the likes of Thetis (Maggie Smith, whose husband, Beverley Cross, wrote the script), Hera (Claire Bloom), and Athena (Susan Fleetwood, the sister of rock drummer Mick Fleetwood).

Although producer Charles H. Schneer maintained at the time "we have given form to what has been in the eye of people who have read the story of Perseus and Andromeda since the Greek myth was first put on paper," Clash of the Titans's parade of evil strays quite a distance from the original legend. The sea monster that destroys the city of Argos in the opening scene comes from a popular Norwegian myth. Calibos, Lord of the Marsh, is based on Caliban from Shakespeare's The Tempest. The giant Vulture and the Forest Scorpions also have zero to do with Greek mythology, and some critics singled out Bubo, the Owl of Brass, as an R2-D2 rip-off. But, it was all Greek to Harryhausen.

Still, it's fun to see Harryhausen's special brand of stop-motion animation compete with live actors, even though the master was loathe to explain how he did it (for the Cinefantastique interview): "I think there's a point where you lose interest in the picture. It's the same principle as a magician. I think there's far too much delving into, and analysis of, special effects...It's a pity that too much is discussed about how it's done because it destroys the illusion. And that's what business we're in, we're in the business of illusion. Just like a magician." Despite this comment, Harryhausen will admit that one favorite aspect of working on Clash of the Titans was his creation of Medusa, the Gorgon. He considered it "a mood piece with a lot of mysterioso lighting, plus the challenge of keeping the 12 snakes on her head in motion while she is in motion as well." Yet, for all the care Harryhausen lavished on the film, it was shut out of the 1981 Oscar race in the special effects category by the likes of Raiders of the Lost Ark and Dragonslayer.

Directed by: Desmond Davis
Screenplay: Beverley Cross
Produced by: Ray Harryhausen, John Palmer, Charles H. Schneer
Visual Effects: Ray Harryhausen
Original Music: Laurence Rosenthal
Production Design: Frank White
Cinematography: Ted Moore
Editing: Timothy Gee
Costume Design: Emma Porteous
Cast: Harry Hamlin (Perseus), Judi Bowker (Andromeda), Burgess Meredith (Ammon), Laurence Olivier (Zeus), Claire Bloom (Hera), Maggie Smith (Thetis), Ursula Andress (Aphrodite), Sian Phillips (Queen Cassiopeia), Flora Robson (Stygian Witch), Freda Jackson (Stygian Witch), Donald Houston (King Acrisius), Neil McCarthy (Calibos).
C-119m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning.

by Paul Tatara
Clash Of The Titans

Clash of the Titans

For better or worse, Ray Harryhausen, the visual wizard behind the mythological spectacle Clash of the Titans (1981), is the father of modern special effects pictures. George Lucas and his Industrial Light and Magic team may have perfected this sort of thing with Star Wars (1977) (which has reached the level of overkill with the recent Lord of the Rings epics) but Harryhausen was the first effects wizard whose name was uttered with reverence by fantasy aficionados around the world. You knew what you were getting with a Harryhausen stop-action film, and he was more than happy to deliver it. The main difference between Harryhausen and Lucas, of course, was that Harryhausen was working well before the dawn of computer animation and huge budgets (due to lack of money, his giant octopus in It Came from Beneath the Sea (1955) had only five arms, instead of eight). Harryhausen's brand of magic was produced through sweat - his creatures were moved inch by inch, then photographed frame by frame to create the illusion of life. Monumental patience was crucial to his success. In many ways, Clash of the Titans is best suited for children, though the by-now quaint nature of its effects should delight movie fans of all ages. Harryhausen's previous ventures, such as Jason and the Argonauts (1963) and The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1974), were unusually inventive but just as equally hamstrung by weak casting and wooden performances. So the producers aimed higher with Clash of the Titans. It features a stellar cast of actors, many of them famous for their stage work in Shakespearean productions. Here they're playing toga-clad second bananas to Harryhausen's fantastical creations. But that's part of the fun. In an interview with Dan Scapperotti for Cinefantastique magazine, screenwriter Beverly Cross recalled, "I had the idea for Clash of the Titans in 1969 while I was living in Greece, on an island called Skiathos. It's very close to Seriphos, the island where legend has it that Perseus, the son of Zeus, was washed ashore in a trunk." In the movie, Harry Hamlin plays Perseus and fights an assortment of outlandish creatures in an attempt to save the beautiful Princess Andromeda (Judi Bowker). Zeus (Laurence Olivier) gazes down from the heavens while Perseus goes toe-to-toe with the likes of Thetis (Maggie Smith, whose husband, Beverley Cross, wrote the script), Hera (Claire Bloom), and Athena (Susan Fleetwood, the sister of rock drummer Mick Fleetwood). Although producer Charles H. Schneer maintained at the time "we have given form to what has been in the eye of people who have read the story of Perseus and Andromeda since the Greek myth was first put on paper," Clash of the Titans's parade of evil strays quite a distance from the original legend. The sea monster that destroys the city of Argos in the opening scene comes from a popular Norwegian myth. Calibos, Lord of the Marsh, is based on Caliban from Shakespeare's The Tempest. The giant Vulture and the Forest Scorpions also have zero to do with Greek mythology, and some critics singled out Bubo, the Owl of Brass, as an R2-D2 rip-off. But, it was all Greek to Harryhausen. Still, it's fun to see Harryhausen's special brand of stop-motion animation compete with live actors, even though the master was loathe to explain how he did it (for the Cinefantastique interview): "I think there's a point where you lose interest in the picture. It's the same principle as a magician. I think there's far too much delving into, and analysis of, special effects...It's a pity that too much is discussed about how it's done because it destroys the illusion. And that's what business we're in, we're in the business of illusion. Just like a magician." Despite this comment, Harryhausen will admit that one favorite aspect of working on Clash of the Titans was his creation of Medusa, the Gorgon. He considered it "a mood piece with a lot of mysterioso lighting, plus the challenge of keeping the 12 snakes on her head in motion while she is in motion as well." Yet, for all the care Harryhausen lavished on the film, it was shut out of the 1981 Oscar race in the special effects category by the likes of Raiders of the Lost Ark and Dragonslayer. Directed by: Desmond Davis Screenplay: Beverley Cross Produced by: Ray Harryhausen, John Palmer, Charles H. Schneer Visual Effects: Ray Harryhausen Original Music: Laurence Rosenthal Production Design: Frank White Cinematography: Ted Moore Editing: Timothy Gee Costume Design: Emma Porteous Cast: Harry Hamlin (Perseus), Judi Bowker (Andromeda), Burgess Meredith (Ammon), Laurence Olivier (Zeus), Claire Bloom (Hera), Maggie Smith (Thetis), Ursula Andress (Aphrodite), Sian Phillips (Queen Cassiopeia), Flora Robson (Stygian Witch), Freda Jackson (Stygian Witch), Donald Houston (King Acrisius), Neil McCarthy (Calibos). C-119m. Letterboxed. Closed Captioning. by Paul Tatara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1989

Released in United States Summer June 1, 1981

Dynarama

Released in United States Summer June 1, 1981

Released in United States July 1989