Bachelor in Paradise


1h 49m 1961
Bachelor in Paradise

Brief Synopsis

A writer moves into a housing development to study married couples.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Romantic Comedy
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jan 1961
Premiere Information
Philadelphia opening: 1 Nov 1961
Production Company
Ted Richmond Productions
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Synopsis

Adam J. Niles, a writer noted for his series of racy books on the sexual mores of foreign peoples, finds himself in debt to the Internal Revenue Service because of a dishonest personal manager. Forbidden to leave the States, he changes his name, moves into Paradise Village, a California housing development, and secretly begins compiling material for a book on how Americans live. The only bachelor in the community, he quickly becomes the center of attention among the bored housewives. Though his activities are watched with suspicion by Rosemary Howard, the community's secretary, Adam organizes a discussion group in which he advises the women on how to bring romance back into their lives. When the jealous husbands try to have him evicted, Rosemary, who has finally been won over, quits her job and becomes Adam's secretary. Eventually Adam's tax problems are solved, but in the process his true identity is revealed, and he is involved in three Paradise Village divorce suits. Aided by Rosemary's testimony and the enthusiastic support of three wives, Adam persuades the presiding female judge of his innocence. The three wives return to their husbands, and Adam declares his love for Rosemary.

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Adaptation
Romantic Comedy
Classic Hollywood
Release Date
Jan 1961
Premiere Information
Philadelphia opening: 1 Nov 1961
Production Company
Ted Richmond Productions
Distribution Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 49m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Metrocolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
2.35 : 1

Award Nominations

Best Song

1961

Articles

Bachelor in Paradise


In 1961, Lana Turner returned to MGM after a five-year absence for this change-of-pace comedy, made while she was completing her reign as queen of such glossy soap operas as Imitation of Life (1959) and By Love Possessed (1961). Bachelor in Paradise, also 1961, offered a welcome change of pace in another way; while she was engaged in a comic courtship with Bob Hope on-screen, she was suffering through continued legal problems with daughter Cheryl Crane off-screen. Although acquitted for killing Turner's gangster boyfriend Johnny Stamponato, Crane's continued problems with juvenile authorities led to her voluntary commitment to the Institute of Living for Psychiatric Treatment in Hartford, Connecticut.

Filming Bachelor in Paradise provided a welcome relief in many ways. The story, about an expert on foreign sexual mores (Bob Hope) who decides to write about life in suburbia, provided several opportunities for lampooning middle-class America. It gave Turner her only chance to work with Hope, who had long dreamed of adding her to his list of glamorous leading ladies like Dorothy Lamour, Paulette Goddard and Hedy Lamarr. And the return to MGM gave her a chance to work with old friends like cinematographer Joseph Ruttenberg and costume designer Helen Rose. But the most important benefit derived from the film was purely financial. When Turner left MGM in 1956, she signed an agreement to make one film a year for five years at a low salary in order to get a full pension from the studio. Although Bachelor in Paradise was the only film made under that contract, it was enough to get her a $92,000 payment from the studio pension fund.

For Hope, the film was part of an attempt at more substantial material than his usual gag-filled comedies. Though he earned his share of laughs in Bachelor in Paradise, it also continued a look at life in America that had started with his previous film, The Facts of Life (1960), with Lucille Ball. Both were made as he was recovering from eye surgery, and gave him the chance to bring more depth to his work while cutting back on the more physical side of his comedy.

Bachelor in Paradise marked the third teaming for Jim Hutton and Paula Prentiss, two young comic actors who had clicked with audiences in Where the Boys Are (1960). They scored again here as the beleaguered newlyweds who almost divorce when Hutton suspects Prentiss of an affair with Hope, but their next film together, The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962), was such a flop it ended the screen team. Both went on to television work, he as detective Ellery Queen and she co-starring with husband Richard Benjamin in the situation comedy He and She. Years later, Hutton's son Timothy would win the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for Ordinary People.

But there was one fledgling career that got a big boost out of Bachelor in Paradise. The title song by Henry Mancini and Mack David was a modest hit and won an Oscar nomination. At the ceremonies, the number was given a sizzling rendition by screen newcomer Ann-Margret, whose only film role at the time had been as Bette Davis's innocent young daughter in Pocketful of Miracles (1961). Her performance on Oscar night gave her a new image - as a sexual tigress of the first degree-and helped make her a star.

Producer: Ted Richmond
Director: Jack Arnold
Screenplay: Valentine Davies & Hal Kanter
Based on the Novel by Vera Caspary
Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg
Art Direction: George W. Davis, Hans Peters
Music: Henry Mancini
Cast: Bob Hope (Adam J. Niles), Lana Turner (Rosemary Howard), Janis Paige (Dolores Jynson), Jim Hutton (Larry Delavane), Paula Prentiss (Linda Delavane), Don Porter (Thomas W. Jynson), Virginia Grey (Camille Quinlaw), Agnes Moorehead (Judge Peterson).
C-110m. Letterboxed.

by Frank Miller

Bachelor In Paradise

Bachelor in Paradise

In 1961, Lana Turner returned to MGM after a five-year absence for this change-of-pace comedy, made while she was completing her reign as queen of such glossy soap operas as Imitation of Life (1959) and By Love Possessed (1961). Bachelor in Paradise, also 1961, offered a welcome change of pace in another way; while she was engaged in a comic courtship with Bob Hope on-screen, she was suffering through continued legal problems with daughter Cheryl Crane off-screen. Although acquitted for killing Turner's gangster boyfriend Johnny Stamponato, Crane's continued problems with juvenile authorities led to her voluntary commitment to the Institute of Living for Psychiatric Treatment in Hartford, Connecticut. Filming Bachelor in Paradise provided a welcome relief in many ways. The story, about an expert on foreign sexual mores (Bob Hope) who decides to write about life in suburbia, provided several opportunities for lampooning middle-class America. It gave Turner her only chance to work with Hope, who had long dreamed of adding her to his list of glamorous leading ladies like Dorothy Lamour, Paulette Goddard and Hedy Lamarr. And the return to MGM gave her a chance to work with old friends like cinematographer Joseph Ruttenberg and costume designer Helen Rose. But the most important benefit derived from the film was purely financial. When Turner left MGM in 1956, she signed an agreement to make one film a year for five years at a low salary in order to get a full pension from the studio. Although Bachelor in Paradise was the only film made under that contract, it was enough to get her a $92,000 payment from the studio pension fund. For Hope, the film was part of an attempt at more substantial material than his usual gag-filled comedies. Though he earned his share of laughs in Bachelor in Paradise, it also continued a look at life in America that had started with his previous film, The Facts of Life (1960), with Lucille Ball. Both were made as he was recovering from eye surgery, and gave him the chance to bring more depth to his work while cutting back on the more physical side of his comedy. Bachelor in Paradise marked the third teaming for Jim Hutton and Paula Prentiss, two young comic actors who had clicked with audiences in Where the Boys Are (1960). They scored again here as the beleaguered newlyweds who almost divorce when Hutton suspects Prentiss of an affair with Hope, but their next film together, The Horizontal Lieutenant (1962), was such a flop it ended the screen team. Both went on to television work, he as detective Ellery Queen and she co-starring with husband Richard Benjamin in the situation comedy He and She. Years later, Hutton's son Timothy would win the Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for Ordinary People. But there was one fledgling career that got a big boost out of Bachelor in Paradise. The title song by Henry Mancini and Mack David was a modest hit and won an Oscar nomination. At the ceremonies, the number was given a sizzling rendition by screen newcomer Ann-Margret, whose only film role at the time had been as Bette Davis's innocent young daughter in Pocketful of Miracles (1961). Her performance on Oscar night gave her a new image - as a sexual tigress of the first degree-and helped make her a star. Producer: Ted Richmond Director: Jack Arnold Screenplay: Valentine Davies & Hal Kanter Based on the Novel by Vera Caspary Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg Art Direction: George W. Davis, Hans Peters Music: Henry Mancini Cast: Bob Hope (Adam J. Niles), Lana Turner (Rosemary Howard), Janis Paige (Dolores Jynson), Jim Hutton (Larry Delavane), Paula Prentiss (Linda Delavane), Don Porter (Thomas W. Jynson), Virginia Grey (Camille Quinlaw), Agnes Moorehead (Judge Peterson). C-110m. Letterboxed. by Frank Miller

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 23, 1961

Released in United States November 1, 1961

CinemaScope

Released in United States Fall October 23, 1961

Released in United States November 1, 1961