Adventure


2h 5m 1946
Adventure

Brief Synopsis

A rough-living sailor has trouble adjusting to domestic life when he marries a librarian.

Film Details

Also Known As
Strange Adventure, The Big Shore Leave, This Strange Adventure
Genre
Romance
Drama
Adventure
Release Date
Feb 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Anointed by Clyde Brion Davis (New York, 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
11,631ft (14 reels)

Synopsis

When his ship is torpedoed by a Japanese submarine, Harry Patterson, a handsome, rough-and-ready World War II merchant marine boatswain, is cast adrift on a launch with a few of his shipmates. Harry remains calm in the face of disaster, but his friend Mudgin panics and makes desperate pleas to God for help, promising to avoid women, liquor and fighting and to donate money to the church if they are saved. Harry finds Mudgin's pleas ridiculous, but no sooner does Mudgin complete his pact with God than a rescue plane appears on the horizon and the men are saved. The seamen are deposited in San Francisco, where they celebrate their safe return to land with a haircut and a visit to a bar. Mudgin breaks all his promises to God soon after arriving in San Francisco and becomes depressed, certain that he has "lost his immortal soul." While Mudgin's shipmates laugh off his concerns, Harry, realizing that Mudgin is truly wracked with guilt, helps his troubled shipmate find his lost soul. Their journey takes them no further than a city library, where Harry and Mudgin meet the attractive, straight-laced librarian Emily Sears. Although intrigued by Emily, Harry repeatedly raises her ire with his brutish manner and argumentative nature. Harry's attention quickly shifts away from Emily, however, when her outgoing roommate, Helen Melohn, arrives. Harry and Helen hit it off immediately, and Emily reluctantly accompanies the three on a dinner date. At the restaurant, Emily stuns Harry when she abandons her reserved demeanor and starts a bar fight to bring the night to a close. Convinced that Emily is the "freshest dame" he ever met, Harry decides to pursue her affections in earnest and arranges to meet the two women the following day at Emily's farm outside the city. Harry and Emily soon fall completely, though contentiously, in love and get married in Reno. When they return to Emily's farm, Harry tells Emily that he will be shipping out in a few days, which comes as a shock to Emily and prompts her to ask for a divorce. Harry sails for the high seas, and during his absence Emily realizes that she is pregnant with Harry's child. While docked in a South American port city, Mudgin falls off the ship and, before dying in Harry's arms, says that his soul has been returned to him. Months after his departure, Harry returns to San Francisco and learns from Helen that Emily has long since given up on him and gone to her farm to give birth to their child. Harry arrives at the farm just as Emily goes into labor, and when the baby is stillborn, he repeatedly slaps the baby until it begins to breathe. Afterward, Harry and Emily share a tender kiss.

Cast

Clark Gable

Harry Patterson

Greer Garson

Emily Sears

Joan Blondell

Helen Melohn

Thomas Mitchell

Mudgin

Tom Tully

Gus

John Qualen

Model T

Richard Haydn

Limo

Lina Romay

Maria

Philip Merivale

"Old" Ramon Estado

Harry Davenport

Dr. Ashlon

Tito Renaldo

"Young" Ramon Estado

Pedro De Cordoba

Felipe

Chef Joseph Milani

Rudolfo

Martin Garralaga

Nick the bartender

Jack Young

Captain

Dorothy Granger

Cashier

Gladden James

Barber

Ray H. Mckay

Barber

Al Masiello

Barber

Billy Newell

Barber

Esther Howard

Blister

Florence Auer

Landlady

Harry Wilson

Big mug

Myron Geiger

Bartender

Lee Phelps

Bartender

George Suzanne

Barfly

Eddie Hart

Milkman

Richard Abbott

Clerk

Fred Hoose

Reader

Major Farrell

Reader

Frank Pharr

Reader

Joe Kamaryt

Reader

Aileen Carlyle

Matron

Jack Sterling

Bouncer

Paul Stader

Bouncer

Frank Hagney

Boss

Betty Blythe

Mrs. Buckley

Pierre Watkin

Mr. Buckley

Charles Latorre

Tony

Dorothy Vaughan

Mrs. Ludlow

Morris Ankrum

Mr. Ludlow

Johnny Berkes

Bum

John Harmon

Taxi driver

Charles Sherlock

Taxi driver

James Darrell

Officer

Garry Owen

Jabbo

Ralph Peters

Joe

Joseph Crehan

Editor

Ray Teal

Rico

Byron Foulger

Littleton

Audrey Totter

Ethel

Marta Linden

Adele

June Terry Pickerell

Nurse

Marjorie Wood

Nurse

Harry Tyler

Doctor

Bess Flowers

Modiste

Joan Thorsen

Model

Stanley Andrews

Third officer

Kay Medford

Red

Rex Ingram

Black preacher

Tim Murdock

Interne

Walter Knox

Blackboot

Jack Kenny

Man in library

Max Davidson

Man in library

Bill Beauman

Man in library

Alex Palasthy

Man in library

Pete Sosso

"Young" Ramon Estado

John Piffle

Man in library

Charles Millsfield

Man in library

Alex Novinsky

Man in library

Charles Meakin

Man in library

William Wagner

Man in library

D'arcy Corrigan

Man in library

Count Stefenelli

Man in library

Fred Fox

Man in library

Eric Mayne

Man in library

Harry Denny

Man in library

Gene Leslie

Man in library

William Mussetter

Man in library

Carli Elinor

Woman in library

Blanche Rose

Woman in library

Margaret Millsfield

Woman in library

Genevieve Bell

Woman in library

Vangie Beilby

Woman in library

Claire Mcdowell

Woman in library

Charles Haefl

Faro dealer

Jeffrey Sayre

Wheel of Fortune

Ed Randolph

Crap man

Charles Regan

Chip man

Tom Kingston

Chip man

Sayre Dearing

Roulette man

Nina Bara

Tomato

Zedra Conde

Tomato

Toni Larue

Tomato

Kanza Omar

Tomato

Augie Gomez

Hack driver

Roque Ybarra

Foreign cab driver

Paul Smith

First mate

Miguel Contreras

Man in cantina

George Derrick

Man in cantina

Charles Stevens

Man in cantina

Robert E. O'connor

Man in cantina

Hercules Mendez

Man in cantina

George Peters

Navy gun crew member

Cliff Powell

Navy gun crew member

Clay Anderson

Young doctor

Jon Gilbreath

Seaman

Franco Corsaro

Waiter in cantina

Lita Cortez

South American girls in cantina

Helen Mcleod

South American girl in cantina

Connie Montoya

South American girl in cantina

Elizabeth Russell

Barbara Billingsley

Rebel Randall

Sue Moore

Martha Wentworth

Dick Elliott

Ila Lee

Barbara Combs

Martha Bamattre

Film Details

Also Known As
Strange Adventure, The Big Shore Leave, This Strange Adventure
Genre
Romance
Drama
Adventure
Release Date
Feb 1946
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp.
Distribution Company
Loew's Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel The Anointed by Clyde Brion Davis (New York, 1937).

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 5m
Sound
Mono (Western Electric Sound System)
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
11,631ft (14 reels)

Articles

Adventure


During World War II, Americans turned to the silver screen for comfort. Audiences flocked in incredible numbers to cinemas, allowing themselves to forget their worries for a couple of hours. In 1936, an astronomical 80 million people per week went to a film in the U.S. Hollywood responded in force with a bevy of cheerful musicals and silly comedies. Many of its own were in the service themselves, including James Stewart, Robert Taylor, and Gene Kelly. So when "The King of Hollywood" was discharged after serving for almost two years (his release papers were signed by General Ronald Reagan), MGM geared up for his celluloid return.

Although MGM pushed hard to get a deferment, Gable went into the Army Air Corps in August of 1942, his chief motivation widely believed to be in honor of Carole Lombard, his wife of only three years, who died in a plane crash in January that year - she was on tour selling war bonds. The Gable that returned had aged from not only the personal tragedy, but also the devastation of war-although he saw very little action firsthand. The property lined up as his comeback vehicle was Adventure, a dramatic romance about a lustful seaman who ultimately finds love and stability with a librarian. It was only fitting that "The King" should have a queen; Greer Garson, at the pinnacle of her career, was cast as the female lead. In 1943, Garson won the Best Actress Oscar® for her role in Mrs. MiniverGone with the Wind (1939). Gable vowed to not act as long as fighting in Europe continued, so production started thirteen days after Victory-in-Europe Day.

The film was based on This Strange Adventure, a novel by Clyde Brion Davis. Although four writers had worked on the screenplay, Fleming was still dissatisfied with the result. He called on oft-collaborator John Lee Mahin to jump in. Mahin did, despite the fact that he was still in the Air Force. He worked in secret and ultimately without a screen credit. Initially, the production was pleasant enough: Greer affectionately nicknamed Fleming "Mr. Vic," and Gable struck up a fast friendship with supporting actress Joan Blondell. Things, however, quickly turned sour; in the biography Clark Gable by Warren G. Harris, MGM publicist Emily Torchia recalls, "Gable and Garson never hit it off. He'd look at her as if she wasn't even there . . . with warm, earthy girls like Jean Harlow and Lana Turner, he was his usual charming self. With others he could be as cold as ice." Blondell was one such earthy girl; prim, British Garson was not. One idiosyncrasy of Garson's infuriated Gable; she insisted upon the placement of screens around the actors during romantic scenes to maintain privacy. She explained in A Rose for Mrs. Miniver: The Life of Greer Garson: "Playing a love scene requires a feeling of intimacy between man and woman and intense concentration. I don't like to look over the shoulder of a man and see the long gloomy sound stage behind the camera, cluttered with equipment and pieces of sets from past pictures." Lina Romay, a bit player in the film, sums up Gable's perspective best with her observation that, "They were opposites. She'd insist on velvet slats around them when they acted. . . whereas Gable was a big, open guy who liked to use four-letter words."

Gable also liked to drink; his alcoholism only worsened after Lombard's death and the resulting added weight was becoming a problem on film. He countered it by taking Dexedrine, an appetite suppressant, but the medicine caused excessive perspiration and "the shakes." Fleming, ever patient, called a stop to the action whenever Gable had an episode. Blondell gained some insight into Gable's mindset when he invited her over to the house for dinner during production. In the Gable biography Long Live the King by Lyn Tornabene, she recalls, "He had Carole's room just the way she left it, but said someday he would change it. . . he had bought every picture Carole ever made, and looked at them, often. He spent a lot of lonely hours at that house." Not every memory, though, was so desperate. At other times she remembered him as jovial: "He'd go get us some steaks, make them himself, and eat with us in the kitchen wearing a towel apron."

Even though the film wrapped in July of 1946, MGM's publicity teams had already been in promotion overdrive for several months. Plastered in magazines, billboards, and featured in radio spots, the film teaser crowed, "Gable's back and Garson's got him!" It was even painted in giant letters on the Loew's Building in Times Square. For once, the two actually had something in common - they hated the ad campaign. Garson decreed it "ungallant", while the Tornabene bio explains, "Clark hated being called 'Gable,' hated being got by Garson, hated the repetition of the slogan." The 1946 premiere at Radio City Music Hall was indicative of the high hopes the studio had for the film, and indeed, Adventure did break all box office records in its first week there. But mixed reviews and rapidly declining audiences quickly put a damper on its opening success. Adventure eventually grossed a respectable half a million in profit, and while not doing Gable's career much harm, the damage to Garson's was severe. The slogan at least provided a last laugh, inspiring that year's Oscars® host Bob Hope to joke about Gable's next project being with a star of another kind: "Clark's bark makes Lassie sassy!"

Producer: Sam Zimbalist
Director: Victor Fleming
Screenplay: Frederick Hazlitt Brennan, Vincent Lawrence, Anthony Veiller, William H. Wright, Clyde Brion Davis (novel)
Cinematography: Joseph Ruttenberg
Film Editing: Frank Sullivan
Art Direction: Cedric Gibbons, Urie McCleary
Music: Herbert Stothart
Cast: Clark Gable (Harry Patterson), Greer Garson (Emily Sears), Joan Blondell (Helen Melohn), Thomas Mitchell (Mudgin), Tom Tully (Gus), John Qualen (Model T).
BW-126m. Closed captioning.

by Eleanor Quin
Adventure

Adventure

During World War II, Americans turned to the silver screen for comfort. Audiences flocked in incredible numbers to cinemas, allowing themselves to forget their worries for a couple of hours. In 1936, an astronomical 80 million people per week went to a film in the U.S. Hollywood responded in force with a bevy of cheerful musicals and silly comedies. Many of its own were in the service themselves, including James Stewart, Robert Taylor, and Gene Kelly. So when "The King of Hollywood" was discharged after serving for almost two years (his release papers were signed by General Ronald Reagan), MGM geared up for his celluloid return. Although MGM pushed hard to get a deferment, Gable went into the Army Air Corps in August of 1942, his chief motivation widely believed to be in honor of Carole Lombard, his wife of only three years, who died in a plane crash in January that year - she was on tour selling war bonds. The Gable that returned had aged from not only the personal tragedy, but also the devastation of war-although he saw very little action firsthand. The property lined up as his comeback vehicle was Adventure, a dramatic romance about a lustful seaman who ultimately finds love and stability with a librarian. It was only fitting that "The King" should have a queen; Greer Garson, at the pinnacle of her career, was cast as the female lead. In 1943, Garson won the Best Actress Oscar® for her role in Mrs. Miniver

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Working titles for this film were The Big Shore Leave, Strange Adventure and This Strange Adventure. The picture marked Clark Gable's first film since his return from serving three years in the Army Air Corps. A September 3, 1941 Hollywood Reporter news item indicates that Spencer Tracy was originally set for the part played by Gable. The same news item noted that production was set to begin the following day. According to a February 1946 article in New York Times, actress Greer Garson, commenting on the publicity line associated with the film, "Gable's Back, and Garson's Got Him," reportedly said: "Well, just as long as they didn't say Garson's back, and who wants her!"
       Although Hollywood Reporter production charts list actor Larry Burke in the cast, his appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A May 1945 article in Los Angeles Daily News notes that the film's set of the San Francisco public library was remodelled from the set used for the Waldorf Astoria hotel lobby in the film Weekend at the Waldorf (see below). Lina Romay was formerly a featured singer with Xavier Cugat's band. Adventure marked the feature film debut of actress Barbara Billingsley, who became best known for her role as "June Cleaver" on the popular television series Leave It to Beaver.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1945

Released in United States 1945