You're Not So Tough


1h 11m 1940

Brief Synopsis

The Dead End Kids are out of the slums of New York's East Side and running around the sunny valleys of California looking for a way to make a quick buck. The idea of working never enters their minds until Halop is egged on by Grey to show his capabilities. Before long, he and Hall are working on the ranch of Galli, an elderly Italian woman who treats her workers like human beings instead of animals. Galli's son disappeared as an infant, and Halop tries to convince her that he is that long lost son, thus possibly sharing in her wealth. Galli is such a good person that Halop is soon motivated by respect instead of greed, so he devises a plan to help her when truckers and a labor organization band together to keep her crops from making it to market.

Film Details

Release Date
Jul 26, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Co.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Co.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 11m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

Tom Lincoln, Pig, String, Ape and Rap, five young hoodlums who live by their wits, are thrown off a freight train in the California fruit fields. At an intinerant camp, Tom and Pig steal a meal from Millie who is living there with her aunt and uncle. That night, the boys are arrested for vagrancy after a scuffle at a crap game. Impressed by Pig and Tom's work, the sheriff finds the boys a job at Mama Lisa Posito's ranch. There Tom learns that Mama yearns for her long-lost son and decides to pose as the boy in order to steal her money. Learning of the ruse, the sheriff warns Tom that he found the dead body of Mama's son years earlier, but is unable to dash Mama's hopes by telling her the truth. Soon afterwards, String, Ape and Rap are released from jail and Mama gives them work at the ranch, and Tom sends Mama's foreman Salvatore to offer Millie and her family jobs. As Pig searches the house for Mama's bankroll, Tom is won over by Mama's kindness and generosity and finds himself unable to steal from her. Troubles beset Mama however, when she refuses to comply with the growers' association demand to cut wages. In retaliation, the association begins a truck boycott against Mama, preventing her from transporting her crops to market. When Mama hires trucks from Sacramento, the growers block the roads leading to Mama's ranch with hired trucks. Just as the crop seems lost, Tommy takes Mama's bankroll to bribe the truckers to leave and then organizes the pickers to force the remaining trucks off the roads with tractors and insecticide. As Tommy breaks through the barrier to drive the crops to market, Mama confides to the sheriff that she knows that Tommy is not her real son, but has become like a son to her.

Film Details

Release Date
Jul 26, 1940
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Universal Pictures Co.
Distribution Company
Universal Pictures Co.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 11m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Now look what you got us into! Jobs!
- Pig
We want what's coming to us, three squares a day and a place to sleep. We have that coming to us. We're Americans.
- Tommy
What? Break our back for a dollar a day?
- Tommy

Trivia

Notes

Although the onscreen credits list Eddy Waller in the role of Griswold, the Call Bureau Cast Service lists Cliff Clark in that role. The Little Tough Guys were an offshoot of the original Dead End Kids as introduced in the 1937 Samuel Goldwyn film and the Sidney Kingsley play Dead End. Various members of the original group, which consisted of Huntz Hall, Leo Gorcey, Gabriel Dell, Billy Halop and Bernard Punsley went on to form a series of other groups. They starred as The Dead End Kids for Warners, as The Little Tough Guys for Universal, The East Side Kids and The Bowery Boys for Monogram. For additional information about the various series, see entries above for Crime School and The Little Tough Guy and consult the Series Index for "The Dead End Kids," "The East Side Kids" and "The Little Tough Guys."