You're in the Navy Now


1h 33m 1951

Brief Synopsis

An experimental steam-powered vessel sets off on its maiden voyage with an inexperienced Naval officer at the helm.

Film Details

Also Known As
Here Comes the Fleet, The Floating Teakettle, The Flying Teakettle, U.S.S. Teakettle
Release Date
Apr 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 23 Feb 1951; Los Angeles opening: 11 Apr 1951
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Newport News, Virginia, United States; Norfolk, Virginia, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the article "The Flying Teakettle" by John W. Hazard in The New Yorker (21 Jan 1950).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Film Length
8,347ft (10 reels)

Synopsis

During World War II, Rear Adm. L. E. Tennant, the head of the Navy's Experimental Research Division, urges his subordinate, Commander Tom Reynolds, to choose a captain for the Navy's latest secret project, a submarine chaser with a steam engine designed to increase speed. Unable to find a captain with both engineering and sea experience, Reynolds gives the command to Lt. John Harkness, a Navy reserve officer who obtained an engineering degree eighteen years earlier. At the Norfolk Naval Base, Harkness bids goodbye to his wife Ellie, who has joined the WAVES. Harkness is dismayed to see the size of his tiny craft compared to the hulking ships moored around it, but hides his nervousness when meeting his officers, Lt. Bill Barron, Ensign Anthony Barbo and Ensign Chuck Dorrance. Believing that Harkness is "regular Navy" like himself, Bosun George Larrabee is horrified to discover later that Harkness is actually a "ninety-day wonder" like the other college-educated officers, who have had no sea duty. The port commander yells at Harkness to move his ship, and after memorizing a seamanship book, Harkness gives a succession of orders to his crew. Despite Harkness' efforts, the crew, including Chief Engineer Ryan, who is used to diesel engines, cannot manage the temperamental steam engine and the craft plows into another ship. Annoyed by Harkness' failure, Reynolds reminds him and the other officers of their training, and of the importance of proving the efficiency of their ship. However, the boiler, which converts salt water into distilled water, explodes during the first trial run, stranding the ship, which does not even have enough power to operate the radio. After the humiliation of being towed back to shore by a battleship, Harkness is further irritated by Reynolds, who declares that the crew will receive no shore leave until a successful trial run is completed. With his ship jokingly christened the U.S.S. Teakettle , Harkness grimly sets about his task, although a series of trial runs proves disastrous. The ship's erratic performance makes the crew the butt of many jokes, and after tough sailor Wascylewski gets into a fight, Harkness and his officers realize that they must boost morale. Harkness arranges for the men to have shore leave, but their dispirited attitude prompts him to enter Wascylewski in the base boxing tournament. As the days pass, the crew enthusiastically watches Wascylewski's training, and Harkness arranges to place an $1,800 bet for them. The crew becomes depressed, however, when they realize that the next trial is scheduled for the day of the fight, and that if they again get stranded, Wascylewski will not be able to compete. Unknown to Harkness, the men bring aboard distilled water and the run is successful, although Wascylewski is injured during the trial and cannot fight. Harkness discovers the water bottles and attempts to report the truth to Reynolds, but the commander is too busy congratulating him to listen. Harkness is dismayed to learn from Ellie that Tennant and the rest of the research board will be coming to Norfolk soon to put the Teakettle through its paces. Fearing that the men will be too upset after losing the bet to complete the run, Harkness is astonished when he returns to the ship and learns that the crew has won their wager, for Barbo entered the fight under Wascylewski's name and trounced his opponent. The next day, Tennant and Reynolds are bewildered by the lengths to which the crew must go to make the juryrigged steam engine run. The voyage fails, however, when the ship smashes into an aircraft carrier after the throttles freeze open. Later, Harkness is summoned before a board of inquiry, and he angrily complains that the inexperienced crew members were incapable of operating the intricate machinery, despite their sincere efforts, and that if the Navy wanted the experiment to succeed, it would have staffed the ship with experienced men. Tennant then explains that the Navy does not have time to train all of its reserves during wartime, and needs to ensure that new equipment can be operated by new sailors. Tennant compliments Harkness on his men's efforts and gives him a letter of commendation from the Secretary of the Navy. Soon after, the men cheer as a diesel engine is fitted into the Teakettle , and prepare to join a convoy of ships bound for sea duty.

Film Details

Also Known As
Here Comes the Fleet, The Floating Teakettle, The Flying Teakettle, U.S.S. Teakettle
Release Date
Apr 1951
Premiere Information
New York opening: 23 Feb 1951; Los Angeles opening: 11 Apr 1951
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Newport News, Virginia, United States; Norfolk, Virginia, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the article "The Flying Teakettle" by John W. Hazard in The New Yorker (21 Jan 1950).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 33m
Film Length
8,347ft (10 reels)

Articles

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.


Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute.

After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland.

TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place:

8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960)
10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963)
1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967)
4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976)

Charles Bronson, 1921-2003

Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81.

He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him.

Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954).

Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West.

These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977).

Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren.

by Michael T. Toole
Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13Th - Tcm Remembers Charles Bronson This Saturday, Sept. 13Th 2003.

TCM Remembers Charles Bronson - Sept. 13th - TCM Remembers Charles Bronson this Saturday, Sept. 13th 2003.

Turner Classic Movies will honor the passing of Hollywood action star Charles Bronson on Saturday, Sept. 13, with a four-film tribute. After years of playing supporting roles in numerous Western, action and war films, including THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN (1960, 8 p.m.) and THE DIRTY DOZEN (1967, 1:15 a.m.), Bronson finally achieved worldwide stardom as a leading man during the late 1960s and early 1970s. TCM's tribute will also include THE GREAT ESCAPE (1963, 10:15 p.m.), Bronson's second teaming with Steve McQueen and James Coburn, and will conclude with FROM NOON TILL THREE (1976, 4 a.m.), co-starring Jill Ireland. TCM will alter it's prime-time schedule this Saturday, Sept. 13th. The following changes will take place: 8:00 PM - The Magnificent Seven (1960) 10:15 PM - The Great Escape (1963) 1:15 AM - The Dirty Dozen (1967) 4:00 AM - From Noon Till Three (1976) Charles Bronson, 1921-2003 Charles Bronson, the tough, stony-faced actor who was one of the most recognizable action heroes in cinema, died on August 30 in Los Angeles from complications from pneumonia. He was 81. He was born Charles Buchinsky on November 3, 1921 in Ehrenfeld, Pennsylvania, one of fifteen children born to Lithuanian immigrant parents. Although he was the only child to have graduated high school, he worked in the coalmines to support his family until he joined the army to serve as a tail gunner during World War II. He used his money from the G.I. Bill to study art in Philadelphia, but while working as a set designer for a Philadelphia theater troupe, he landed a few small roles in some productions and immediately found acting to be the craft for him. Bronson took his new career turn seriously, moved to California, and enrolled for acting classes at The Pasadena Playhouse. An instructor there recommended him to director Henry Hathaway for a movie role and the result was his debut in Hathaway's You're in the Navy Now (1951). He secured more bit parts in films like John Sturges' drama The People Against O'Hara (1951), and Joseph Newman's Bloodhounds of Broadway (1952). More substantial roles came in George Cukor's Pat and Mike (1952, where he is beaten up by Katharine Hepburn!); Andre de Toth's classic 3-D thriller House of Wax (1953, as Vincent Price's mute assistant, Igor); and De Toth's fine low-budget noir Crime Wave (1954). Despite his formidable presence, his leads were confined to a string of B pictures like Gene Fowler's Gang War; and Roger Corman's tight Machine Gun Kelly (both 1958). Following his own television series, Man With a Camera (1958-60), Bronson had his first taste of film stardom when director Sturges casted him as Bernardo, one of the The Magnificent Seven (1960). Bronson displayed a powerful charisma, comfortably holding his own in a high-powered cast that included Yul Brynner and Steve McQueen. A few more solid roles followed in Sturges' The Great Escape (1963), and Robert Aldrich's classic war picture The Dirty Dozen (1967), before Bronson made the decision to follow the European trail of other American actors like Clint Eastwood and Lee Van Cleef. It was there that his hard, taciturn screen personae exploded in full force. In 1968 alone, he had four hit films: Henri Verneuil's Guns for San Sebastian, Buzz Kulik's Villa Rides, Jean Herman's Adieu l'ami which was a smash in France; and the classic Sergio Leone spaghetti Western Once Upon a Time in the West. These films established Bronson as a huge box-office draw in Europe, and with some more stylish hits like Rene Clement's Rider on the Rain (1969), and Terence Young's Cold Sweat (1971) he soon became one of the most popular film stars in the world. It wasn't easy for Bronson to translate that success back in his homeland. In fact, his first few films on his return stateside: Michael Winners' Chato's Land, and The Mechanic (both 1972), and Richard Fleischer's Mr. Majestyk (1973), were surprisingly routine pictures. It wasn't until he collaborated with Winner again for the controversial Death Wish (1974), an urban revenge thriller about an architect who turns vigilante when his wife and daughter are raped, did he notch his first stateside hit. The next few years would be a fruitful period for Bronson as he rode on a wave of fine films and commercial success: a depression era streetfighter in Walter Hill's terrific, if underrated Hard Times (1975); Frank Gilroy's charming offbeat black comedy From Noon Till Three (1976, the best of many teamings with his second wife, Jill Ireland); Tom Gries tense Breakheart Pass; and Don Siegel's cold-war thriller Telefon (1977). Sadly, Bronson could not keep up the momentum of good movies, and by the '80s he was starring in a string of forgettable films like Ten to Midnight (1983), The Evil That Men Do (1984), and Murphy's Law (1986, all directed by J. Lee Thompson). A notable exception to all that tripe was John Mackenzie's fine telefilm Act of Vengeance (1986), where he earned critical acclaim in the role of United Mine Workers official Jack Yablonski. Although he more or less fell into semi-retirement in the '90s, his performances in Sean Penn's The Indian Runner (1991); and the title role of Michael Anderson's The Sea Wolf (1993) proved to many that Bronson had the makings of a fine character actor. He was married to actress Jill Ireland from 1968 until her death from breast cancer in 1990. He is survived by his third wife Kim Weeks, six children, and two grandchildren. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of this film were The Flying Teakettle, U.S.S. Teakettle, Here Comes the Fleet and The Floating Teakettle. The picture was reviewed and released in New York under the title U.S.S. Teakettle, but the title was changed to You're in the Navy Now in early March 1951. According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, the title was changed in the hope that it would "prove more appealing and allow for stronger exploitation."
       After the film's opening credits, a written statement declares: "War is a never-ending series of experiments with equipment, machines and men. Research runs from bombs-atomic, all the way down to pickles-how to package. In the early years of World War II, the Navy Department, among its thousands of other projects, had one known as XP11204." At the film's conclusion, another written statement acknowledges the Navy's help: "It is obvious that this picture could not have been attempted without the cooperation of the Department of Defense and the United States Navy. We wish to express our gratitude to the personnel who so willingly and cheerfully aided us in the making of it."
       John W. Hazard's article was based on his experiences as executive officer and navigator, and later captain, of the PC-452, an experimental submarine chaser tested during World War II. The ship, which was put into commission in July 1943, was equipped with "two ultra-modern, experimental steam boilers" and staffed by inexperienced men. Hazard himself was a newspaperman at the time of his appointment to the ship, which became known as The Flying Teakettle. After many unsuccessful trial runs, some of which ended in near-disaster, the ship was de-commissioned in December 1944.
       The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, reveal that Richard Sale and Mary Loos prepared an adaptation of Hazard's story in early March 1950, although their work was not incorporated into the completed screenplay. According to a March 1950 Hollywood Reporter news item, the picture was originally to star William Lundigan. Although a December 1950 Hollywood Reporter news item includes John Dugan in the cast, his appearance in the completed film has not been confirmed. Contemporary sources note that portions of the picture were shot on location at Newport News and Norfolk, VA. Although Hollywood Reporter production charts credit Robert Fritch as the film's editor, only James B. Clark is listed in the picture's onscreen credits. According to a June 1954 memo in the legal records, the film had a net loss of $122,000. The picture marked the screen debuts of actors Lee Marvin (1924-1987), Jack Warden (1920-2006) and Charles Bronson (1920-2003), who was known as Charles Buchinski at the time.
       In March 1953, author Arthur Curtis filed a $100,000 lawsuit against the studio, claiming infringement upon the title of his 1944 novel Hey, Mac! You're in the Navy Now. In July 1953, a Superior Court jury ruled in favor of Twentieth Century-Fox. Curtis appealed the decision, but the studio again received a favorable judgment in April 1956 from the California District Court of Appeals.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1951

Released in United States 1951