The Year of Living Dangerously


1h 55m 1982
The Year of Living Dangerously

Brief Synopsis

Two American journalists get more than they'd bargained for during an Indonesian revolution.

Film Details

Also Known As
El año que vivimos peligrosamente, Year of Living Dangerously
Genre
Romance
Drama
Adventure
Historical
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Australian Film Commission (AFC); Mcelroy & Mcelroy Productions; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Vangelis
Distribution Company
Communications & Entertainment International Ltd; MGM Distribution Company; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; United International Pictures
Location
Australia; Philippines

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Synopsis

Guy Hamilton is an Australian journalist on his first job as a foreign correspondent in Indonesia during the 1965 coup against President Sukarno. With the help of his half-Chinese photographer, Billy Kwan, Guy becomes the hottest reporter on the story. As all of Jakarta erupts into chaos, Guy's romance with British diplomat, Jill Bryant heats up. Eventually, Guy must face a major moral dilemma as his relationship with Billy reaches a boiling point.

Crew

Sandra Alexander

Production Assistant

Ramon Alonzo

Wardrobe (Philippines)

William Anderson

Editor

Jose Angeles

Assistant Director

Alison Barrett

Casting

Wayne Barry

Assistant Director (Philippines)

Nixon Binney

Camera Operator

Robert A Blackwell

Song ("Long Tall Sally")

Jenny Bolton

Wardrobe

Michael Bourchier

Assistant Director (Philippines)

Frank Bourke

Song Performer ("Beautiful Ohio Waltz")

Russell Boyd

Director Of Photography

Ray Brown

Key Grip

Fran Burke

Titles

Vicente Cabrera

Wardrobe (Philippines)

Celso Al Carunungan

Production Consultant (Philippines)

Jeanine Chialvo

Associate Editor

Michael Chorney

Scenic Artist

Gethin Creagh

Sound Rerecording Mixer (Music)

Jessie Cuneta

Location Manager (Philippines)

Carolynne Cunningham

Production Coordinator (Australia)

Sunny David

Song ("Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On")

Andrew Davis

Music ("September")

Tex Davis

Song ("Be-Bop-A-Lula")

Jaime De La Rosa

Production Liaison

Danny Dominguez

Special Effects (Philippines)

Danny Dominquez

Scenic Artist (Philippines)

Phillip Eagles

Wardrobe (Standby/Philippines)

Mary Earl

Song ("Beautiful Ohio Waltz")

Mark Egerton

1st Assistant Director (Sydney)

Mark Egerton

Production Supervisor

Peter Fenton

Sound Rerecording Mixer (Dialogue)

Freddie Fields

Producer

Ulysses Formanez

Assistant Director

Murray Francis

Unit Manager

Gina Garcia

Wardrobe

Phil Heywood

Sound Effects Rerecording

Moya Iceton

Script Supervisor

Preci Iniego

Casting (Philippines)

Maurice Jarre

Music

Enotris Johnson

Song ("Long Tall Sally")

Anthony Jones

Costume Supervisor

Lope V Juban Jr.

Production Coordinator (Philippines)

Walter Kent

Song ("White Cliffs Of Dover")

C J Koch

Source Material (From Novel)

C J Koch

Screenwriter

Dorothy Labostrie

Song ("Tutti Frutti")

Jerry Lee Lewis

Song Performer ("Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On")

Cadet Erik Sven Libaek

Music Coordinator

Pinserosa Libre

Casting (Philippines)

Little Richard

Songs

Little Richard

Song Performer ("Long Tall Sally" "Tutti Frutti")

Judy Lovell

Special Makeup Effects

Judy Lovell

Makeup

Joe Lubin

Song ("Tutti Frutti")

Vera Lynn

Song Performer ("White Cliffs Of Dover")

Ballard Macdonald

Song ("Beautiful Ohio Waltz")

Billy Malcolm

Scenic Artist

Bob Mccarron

Special Makeup Effects

Jim Mcelroy

Producer

Roger Monk

Wardrobe (Standby/Philippines)

Clark Munro

Props

Federico Natividad

Assistant Editor (Philippines)

Monica Pellizzari

Production Assistant

Herbert Pinter

Art Direction

Ron Purvis

Sound Recording Supervisor Mixer

Jimmy Reed

Song Performer ("Ain'T That Lovin' You Baby")

Jimmy Reed

Song

Ken Richardson

Assistant Director

Terry Ryan

Costume Designer

Tim Sanders

Production Manager

John Seale

Director Of Photography 2nd Unit (2nd Unit)

Alan Sharp

Screenwriter

Babette Smith

Publicist

Lee Smith

Associate Editor

Andrew Steuart

Sound Editor

Roy Stevens

Line Producer

Wendy Stites

Other

Richard Strauss

Music ("September" From "Four Last Songs")

Jim Townley

Stills

Gene Vincent

Song

Gene Vincent

Song Performer ("Be-Bop-A-Lula")

Pudji Waseso

Technical Advisor

Chris Webb

Assistant Director

Peter Weir

Screenwriter

Wendy Weir

Other

John Wiggins

Location Manager

Gary Wilkins

Sound Recording Mixer

Cheryl Williams

Hairstyles

Dave Williams

Song

David C. Williams

Song ("Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On")

David Williamson

Screenwriter

Andrew Thomas Wilson

Synthesizer Programmer

Robert Woolcott

Assistant Director

Photo Collections

The Year of Living Dangerously - Movie Poster
The Year of Living Dangerously - Movie Poster

Videos

Movie Clip

Trailer

Hosted Intro

Film Details

Also Known As
El año que vivimos peligrosamente, Year of Living Dangerously
Genre
Romance
Drama
Adventure
Historical
Foreign
Adaptation
Release Date
1982
Production Company
Australian Film Commission (AFC); Mcelroy & Mcelroy Productions; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; Vangelis
Distribution Company
Communications & Entertainment International Ltd; MGM Distribution Company; Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc.; United International Pictures
Location
Australia; Philippines

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Award Wins

Best Supporting Actress

1982
Linda Hunt

Articles

The Year of Living Dangerously


There was a lot of heat on the set of Peter Weir's politically-charged romance, The Year of Living Dangerously (1982), and it wasn't just the weather. The teaming of Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver, both of whom appear at their sleekest and sexiest, was a positive form of friction. But there was also the unwanted attention of an angry group of Muslims who incorrectly assumed the movie's location shoot in Manila (standing in for Indonesia) was anti-Islamic. Weir had to finish the picture in Australia when his increasingly jumpy cast and crew began to feel they were living dangerously themselves.

Gibson stars as Guy Hamilton, an Australian journalist who's covering the 1965 coup against Indonesia's Sukarno government. Hamilton navigates crowded streets that bustle with marchers singing songs of protest, while white Westerners wrestle the hard truths of life in a fracturing political system. Also on hand are Jill Bryant (Weaver), a beautiful woman who works for the British embassy, and Billy Kwan (Linda Hunt), a street-smart photographer who initiates a romance between Hamilton and Bryant...both of whom may be the object of his affections. Kwan, who happens to be a dwarf, also serves as the film's occasional narrator.

Hunt, of course, was cast considerably against type when she won the role of the lovelorn Kwan. But her work was startling enough to merit an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Even she didn't know if she was ready for such a challenging role - at one point, she lobbied to have the character re-written as a woman. Weir had originally cast an Australian man as Kwan, but grew disenchanted with the actor in rehearsals. He was floored by Hunt's audition while searching for a replacement, and immediately hired her.

Though it would establish her ongoing career in motion pictures, Hunt, who was already an accomplished stage actress, suffered emotionally during the shoot. "I once ordered room service in the hotel," she later remembered, "and when the bellboy kept saying 'Yes sir, yes sir,' I dissolved into tears. That also happened once in a restaurant."

Even that was a minor problem, though, when stacked against the ominous letters and phone calls that the film company received from outraged fundamentalists. At one point, 10,000 Filipinos filled the Muslim quarter of Manila, muttering curses and shouting threats at the cast and crew. There was even a bomb threat. Gibson remembers receiving a particularly menacing phone call, during which the caller kept asking, "Are you a brave and courageous man, Mr. Gibson?" The actors soon began traveling with bodyguards in tow.

This unexpected real-life situation - which was the result of a complex misunderstanding about why the movie was shooting in Manila rather than Indonesia - was eerily like one of Weir's own films. As he said in a 1979 Washington Post interview: "Everything is built on the real and the ordinary, but there's chaos underneath. We try to protect ourselves from the mystery, but it's all around us, just waiting to reveal itself and terrorize us. The ironic thing about movies is that you can use this highly sophisticated technology to restore the sense of mystery that an industrialized urban society tends to obscure."

Weir ultimately had enough. "I think the threat was very real," he later said. "I received one of the phone calls and read one of the letters. Both combined religious fanaticism with the kind of unpredictability and conviction we saw (during the U.S. hostage crisis) in Iran. I was scared." The cast and crew's evacuation came swiftly, and, for most, not a moment too soon. "We were having lunch," Weaver said, "and a representative of the producer came over and said in a solemn voice, 'It's now 2 pm. By 2:20 we'll be having a meeting, and by 4 you'll be on a plane out of here.' I threw the important things in a suitcase and ran out the door."

Directed by: Peter Weir
Producer: James McElroy
Screenplay: C.J. Koch, Peter Weir, and David Williamson
Editing: William Anderson
Cinematography: Russell Boyd
Art Direction: Herbert Pinter
Music: Maurice Jarre
Costume Design: Terry Ryan
Principal Cast: Mel Gibson (Guy Hamilton), Sigourney Weaver (Jill Bryant), Linda Hunt (Billy Kwan), Michael Murphy (Pete Curtis), Bembol Roco (Kumar), Domingo Landicho (Hortono), Hermino De Guzman (Immigration Officer), Noel Ferrier (Wally O'Sullivan), Paul Sonkkila (Kevin Condon), Ali Nur (Ali)
C-115m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Paul Tatara
The Year Of Living Dangerously

The Year of Living Dangerously

There was a lot of heat on the set of Peter Weir's politically-charged romance, The Year of Living Dangerously (1982), and it wasn't just the weather. The teaming of Mel Gibson and Sigourney Weaver, both of whom appear at their sleekest and sexiest, was a positive form of friction. But there was also the unwanted attention of an angry group of Muslims who incorrectly assumed the movie's location shoot in Manila (standing in for Indonesia) was anti-Islamic. Weir had to finish the picture in Australia when his increasingly jumpy cast and crew began to feel they were living dangerously themselves. Gibson stars as Guy Hamilton, an Australian journalist who's covering the 1965 coup against Indonesia's Sukarno government. Hamilton navigates crowded streets that bustle with marchers singing songs of protest, while white Westerners wrestle the hard truths of life in a fracturing political system. Also on hand are Jill Bryant (Weaver), a beautiful woman who works for the British embassy, and Billy Kwan (Linda Hunt), a street-smart photographer who initiates a romance between Hamilton and Bryant...both of whom may be the object of his affections. Kwan, who happens to be a dwarf, also serves as the film's occasional narrator. Hunt, of course, was cast considerably against type when she won the role of the lovelorn Kwan. But her work was startling enough to merit an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. Even she didn't know if she was ready for such a challenging role - at one point, she lobbied to have the character re-written as a woman. Weir had originally cast an Australian man as Kwan, but grew disenchanted with the actor in rehearsals. He was floored by Hunt's audition while searching for a replacement, and immediately hired her. Though it would establish her ongoing career in motion pictures, Hunt, who was already an accomplished stage actress, suffered emotionally during the shoot. "I once ordered room service in the hotel," she later remembered, "and when the bellboy kept saying 'Yes sir, yes sir,' I dissolved into tears. That also happened once in a restaurant." Even that was a minor problem, though, when stacked against the ominous letters and phone calls that the film company received from outraged fundamentalists. At one point, 10,000 Filipinos filled the Muslim quarter of Manila, muttering curses and shouting threats at the cast and crew. There was even a bomb threat. Gibson remembers receiving a particularly menacing phone call, during which the caller kept asking, "Are you a brave and courageous man, Mr. Gibson?" The actors soon began traveling with bodyguards in tow. This unexpected real-life situation - which was the result of a complex misunderstanding about why the movie was shooting in Manila rather than Indonesia - was eerily like one of Weir's own films. As he said in a 1979 Washington Post interview: "Everything is built on the real and the ordinary, but there's chaos underneath. We try to protect ourselves from the mystery, but it's all around us, just waiting to reveal itself and terrorize us. The ironic thing about movies is that you can use this highly sophisticated technology to restore the sense of mystery that an industrialized urban society tends to obscure." Weir ultimately had enough. "I think the threat was very real," he later said. "I received one of the phone calls and read one of the letters. Both combined religious fanaticism with the kind of unpredictability and conviction we saw (during the U.S. hostage crisis) in Iran. I was scared." The cast and crew's evacuation came swiftly, and, for most, not a moment too soon. "We were having lunch," Weaver said, "and a representative of the producer came over and said in a solemn voice, 'It's now 2 pm. By 2:20 we'll be having a meeting, and by 4 you'll be on a plane out of here.' I threw the important things in a suitcase and ran out the door." Directed by: Peter Weir Producer: James McElroy Screenplay: C.J. Koch, Peter Weir, and David Williamson Editing: William Anderson Cinematography: Russell Boyd Art Direction: Herbert Pinter Music: Maurice Jarre Costume Design: Terry Ryan Principal Cast: Mel Gibson (Guy Hamilton), Sigourney Weaver (Jill Bryant), Linda Hunt (Billy Kwan), Michael Murphy (Pete Curtis), Bembol Roco (Kumar), Domingo Landicho (Hortono), Hermino De Guzman (Immigration Officer), Noel Ferrier (Wally O'Sullivan), Paul Sonkkila (Kevin Condon), Ali Nur (Ali) C-115m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Paul Tatara

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1982

Released in United States Winter January 21, 1983

Released in United States March 1996

Released in United States 1999

Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival (A Salute to Sigourney Weaver) March 8-17, 1996.

Shown at Singapore International Film Festival April 16 - May 1, 1999.

Released in United States December 1982

Released in United States Winter January 21, 1983

Released in United States March 1996 (Shown at Santa Barbara International Film Festival (A Salute to Sigourney Weaver) March 8-17, 1996.)

Released in United States 1999 (Shown at Singapore International Film Festival April 16 - May 1, 1999.)