Wolfen


1h 55m 1981

Brief Synopsis

Detective Dewey Wilson is investigating several strange murders in New York City. All the victims look as if they have been mutilated by wild animals. His investigation leads him to a group of Native Americans who tell him about the legend of a superior species that once roamed the area, but who ar

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1981
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Synopsis

Detective Dewey Wilson is investigating several strange murders in New York City. All the victims look as if they have been mutilated by wild animals. His investigation leads him to a group of Native Americans who tell him about the legend of a superior species that once roamed the area, but who are now living and hunting in the slums of New York.

Crew

Frederick M Abeles

Director Of Photography

Frederick M Abeles

Other

Bill Anagnos

Stunts

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Bob Bailin

Photography

Steve Barnett

Assistant Director

Patricia Barrow

Production Assistant

Bernard Baschet Batola

Sound

Mary Bauer

Assistant Editor

Lon Bender

Sound Effects Editor

Glenn Benoit

Stunts

Jack Benson

Production Assistant

Francois Baschet Bertola

Sound

Michael Besman

Production Assistant

Frank Bianco

Hair

Robert Blalack

Photography

Marshall M. Borden

Editor

John Boxer

Costumes

Martin Bram

Editor

Conrad V Brink

Special Effects

Betzy Bromberg

Visual Effects

Garrett Brown

Steadicam Operator

Timothy Burke

Production Assistant

Lisa A Cain

Stunts

David Chapman

Art Director

Arthur Coburn

Post-Production Coordinator

James A Corbett

Sound

Cis Corman

Casting

David Delia

Production Assistant

Dennis Dolan

Editor

John Duffy

Sound Effects Editor

David Eyre

From Story

David Eyre

Screenplay

David Eyre

Story By

Tony Farentino

Stunts

Janis Feiger

Stunts

Steven Felder

Assistant Director

Jonathan Filley

Production Assistant

Gerry Fisher

Director Of Photography

Gerry Fisher

Other

Wayne Fitzgerald

Titles

Carl Fullerton

Special Makeup Effects

Tim Gallin

Stunts

Janiss Garza

Production Assistant

Edward Garzero

Scenic Artist

Sidney Gecker

Script Supervisor

William C. Gerrity

Production Manager

Stan Gilbert

Sound Effects Editor

Michael Ginsburg

Photography

Dulcinda Gose

Researcher

Robert Grieve

Sound Effects

Alex Hapsas

Assistant Director

Ricky Hawkeye

Stunts

Jeff Haynes

Animal Trainer

Scott Hecker

Foley Editor

Dan Helleck

Production Assistant

Jery Hewitt

Stunts

Alan Hicks

Set Decorator

Hall Hitzig

Assistant Director

Rupert Hitzig

Producer

Joe Hornak

Animal Trainer

James Horner

Music

Richard Hughes

Scenic Artist

Steve James

Stunts

Kenneth Karman

Music Editor

Randy Kelley

Sound Effects Editor

Alan King

Executive Producer

Laurel Klick

Visual Effects

Richard Kline

Stunts

Chris Lebenzon

Editor

Jordan Leondopoulos

Editor

Candy Lewis

Visual Effects

William Loger

Wardrobe Supervisor

Andrew London

Sound Effects

Vic Magnotta

Stunt Coordinator

Dennis Maitland

Sound

Kim Maitland

Sound

Paula Mazur

Production Assistant

Lauren Mcgowan

Production Assistant

Peter Mcintosh

Location Manager

Anthony R Milch

Sound Effects Editor

Billy Miller

Key Grip

Pete Miller

Stunts

Michael Minkler

Sound

Edgard Mourino

Stunts

Herb Mulligan

On-Set Dresser

Eddy Navas

Stunts

Ron Ottesen

Special Effects

Sarah Pasanen

Visual Effects

Ken S Polk

Sound

Tom Priestley

Camera Operator

Joaquin Rainbow

Stunts

Jimmy Raitt

Props

Christopher Regan

Visual Effects

Paul Bruce Richardson

Sound Effects Editor

John Roesch

Sound Effects

John Roesch

Foley

Andrew Romanoff

Other

Nancy Rushlow

Visual Effects

Robert R Rutledge

Foley Editor

Robert R Rutledge

Foley

Bruce Sands

Production Assistant

Adeline Leonard Seakwood

Production Coordinator

Konrad Sheehan

Stunts

Eion Sprott

Art Director

Don Stern

Photography

Bruce Stoff

Production Assistant

Tony Stratta

Stunts

Whitley Strieber

Source Material

Paul Sylbert

Production Designer

Jacque Toberen

Post-Production Coordinator

George N Toth

Technical Supervisor

George N Toth

Animal Services

Nicholas Toth

Stunts

Nicholas Toth

Animal Trainer

Donna Tracy

Visual Effects

Anne Van Der Vort

Visual Effects

Victoria Vanderkloot

Stunts

Michael Wadleigh

From Story

Michael Wadleigh

Screenplay

Michael Wadleigh

Story By

Tom Waits

Song Performer

Dan Wallin

Sound

Marvin Walowitz

Sound Effects Editor

Helena Walsh

Animal Trainer

Allen Weisinger

Makeup

Jerry Winikoff

Production Assistant

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Release Date
1981
Location
New York City, New York, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 55m

Articles

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003


Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California.

Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances.

His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991).

He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57. Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California. Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances. His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991). He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States July 1981

Released in United States Summer July 24, 1981

Released in USA on video.

Released in United States July 1981

Released in United States Summer July 24, 1981