White Nights


2h 15m 1985

Brief Synopsis

A top Russian ballet dancer, who defected to the US, crash lands back in his own country. The KGB throws him in Siberia to live with an American expatriate and his Russian wife as a way of convincing him to stay in his homeland.

Film Details

Also Known As
Vita nätter
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Dance
Drama
Political
Spy
Thriller
Release Date
1985
Production Company
Columbia Pictures; Movie Magic; Pacific Title & Art Studio
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing; 20th Century Fox International; Columbia-Emi-Warner; Rca/Columbia Pictures Home Video; Sony Pictures Releasing; Sony Pictures Releasing International
Location
Finland; England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Synopsis

A top Russian ballet dancer, who defected to the US, crash lands back in his own country. The KGB throws him in Siberia to live with an American expatriate and his Russian wife as a way of convincing him to stay in his homeland.

Crew

Tony Aherne

Assistant Director

Walt Aldridge

Song ("My Love Is Chemical")

Andrea Asimow

Consultant

Johann Sebastian Bach

Music Extract ("Passacaglia In C Minor")

Mikhail Baryshnikov

Additional Choreography

Ron Beck

Wardrobe (Supervisor)

Stuart Benjamin

Executive Producer

Stephen Bishop

Song ("Separate Lives")

Robbie Blunt

Song ("Far Post")

Bill Borden

Associate Producer

Peter Brayham

Stunt Coordinator

Bob Bridges

Video Operator

Jenny Burton

Song Performer ("People Have Got To Move")

Jose Sa Caetano

Assistant Director (Portugal)

Helen Caldwell

Stunts

Phil Collins

Song Performer ("Separate Lives")

Michel Colombier

Song ("People On A String")

Michel Colombier

Music; Music Extract (Transcription) "Passaraglia C Minor)

Jeffrey Conroy

Production Assistant (Usa)

Freddie Cooper

Camera Operator

Mo Copitters

Production Coordinator

Ray Corbett

Assistant Director

Steve Crawley

Stunts

Richard Dawking

Art Direction

Don Digirolamo

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Doreen A Dixon

Adr Editor Supervisor

Nancy Dowd

Screenwriter

Peter Elford

Location Manager

Roberta Flack

Song Performer ("People On A String")

David Foster

Song Performer ("Tapdance")

David Foster

Song

James W Gavin

Aerial Unit Director

George Gershwin

Music ("There'S A Boat Dat'S Leavin' Soon For New York")

Ira Gershwin

Lyrics ("There'S A Boat Dat'S Leavin' Soon For New York")

William S. Gilmore Jr.

Producer

Robert W Glass

Sound Rerecording Mixer

James Goldman

Story By

James Goldman

Screenwriter

James Goldman

From Story

Deveril Goodman

Associate Editor

Romo Gorrara

Stunts

Martin Gutteridge

Special Effects Aerial Unit

Taylor Hackford

Producer

Bernard Hansen

Location Manager

Anja Harjula

Production Manager (Finland)

Bob Harmon

Stunts

John Harris

Additional Photography

Evangeline Harrison

Costume Designer

Philip Harrison

Production Designer

Jeff Hawke

Aerial Unit Coordinator

Jeff Hawke

Other

Jerry Hey

Song ("Tapdance")

John Hiatt

Song Performer ("Snake Charmer")

John Hiatt

Song

Gregory Hines

Choreography (Tap Improvography)

Frank Holgate

Aerial Photography

Dave Holland

Stunts

Joseph H Holsen

Sound Editor

Denis Holt

Executive In Charge Of Production

James Newton Howard

Song ("Prove Me Wrong")

Eric Hughes

Screenwriter

Garth Inns

Special Effects Aerial Unit

Juhani Jotuni

Unit Manager (Finland)

Jay Kamen

Adr Editor

Johanna Karava

Production Coordinator (Finland)

Tom Keane

Song ("Tapdance")

Chaka Khan

Song Performer ("The Other Side Of The World")

Nancy Klopper

Casting

Robert Knudson

Sound Rerecording Mixer

Marilyn Martin

Song Performer ("Separate Lives")

Madeline Masters

Makeup

Tom Mccarthy

Sound Editor Supervisor

Harold Michelson

Visual Continuity

Malcolm Middleton

Art Direction

Roy Moores

Other

Doug Morris

Music Guidance

Mario Do Carmo Moser

Production Manager (Portugal)

Matti Ollila

Assistant Director (Finland)

David Pack

Song Performer ("Prove Me Wrong")

David Pack

Song

Dan Perri

Title Design

Roland Petit

Choreography ("Le Jeune Homme Et La Mort")

Kieron Phipps

Assistant Director

Robert Plant

Song Performer ("Far Post")

Robert Plant

Song

Phil Ramone

Music Supervisor

Lou Reed

Song Performer ("My Love Is Chemical")

John Richards

Music Recording Mixer

Lionel Richie

Song Performer ("Say You Say Me")

Lionel Richie

Song

B A Robertson

Song ("The Other Side Of The World")

Nile Rodgers

Song ("People Have Got To Move" "This Is Your Day")

Nile Rodgers

Song Performer ("This Is Your Day")

Mike Rutherford

Song ("The Other Side Of The World")

Neville Smallwood

Makeup

Tony Smith

Music Guidance

Curt Sobel

Music Editor Supervisor

Austen Spriggs

Art Direction

Carrie Stein

Production Associate (Usa)

Frederic Steinkamp

Editor

William Steinkamp

Editor

Sandy Stewart

Song Performer ("This Is Your Day")

Janet Tebrooke

Wardrobe (Mistress)

Twyla Tharp

Choreography

Neville C Thompson

Production Manager

Vladimir Vysotsky

Additional Music

Kathy Wakefield

Song ("People On A String")

Don S Walden

Sound Editor

David Watkin

Other

David Watkin

Director Of Photography

Malcolm Weaver

Stunts

Ian Wingrove

Special Effects Aerial Unit

Clive Winter

Sound Recording Mixer

Ken Withers

Additional Photography

Jezz Woodroffe

Song ("Far Post")

Joanne Woollard

Set Decorator

Paul Zydel

Adr Mixer

Film Details

Also Known As
Vita nätter
MPAA Rating
PG-13
Genre
Dance
Drama
Political
Spy
Thriller
Release Date
1985
Production Company
Columbia Pictures; Movie Magic; Pacific Title & Art Studio
Distribution Company
Sony Pictures Releasing; 20th Century Fox International; Columbia-Emi-Warner; Rca/Columbia Pictures Home Video; Sony Pictures Releasing; Sony Pictures Releasing International
Location
Finland; England, United Kingdom

Technical Specs

Duration
2h 15m

Award Wins

Best Song

1985

Award Nominations

Best Song

1985

Articles

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003


Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57.

Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California.

Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances.

His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991).

He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson.

by Michael T. Toole
Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, 1946-2003

Gregory Hines, the lithe, elegant entertainer who trilled audiences on stage, film and television, died of cancer on August 9 in Los Angeles. He was 57. Born Gregory Oliver Hines on February 14, 1946, in New York City, he began taking dance lessons at age three and by the time he was six he and his brother Maurice were performing jazz tap at Harlem's Apollo Theater. By 1954, Hines was already on Broadway when he joined the cast of the Broadway musical The Girl in Pink Tights. He then spent the next 20 years perfecting the craft and art of tap dancing as he toured with his brother and father Maurice Sr. in a nightclub circuit act called "Hines, Hines and Dad", before he left in 1973 to form a rock band called Severance in Southern California. Itching to put his dancing shoes on again, Hines made it back to New York a few years later and in 1978, scored his first Broadway success with Eubie, and earned a Tony nomination. With his vitality, charm and grace, Hines became one of the leading lights on Broadway for the next few years, as exemplified by two more Broadway hits in Comin' Uptown (1980) and Sophisticated Ladies (1981), for which he received two more Tony nominations for his performances. His charismatic presence made him natural for films, and he notched his first film role as a last minute replacement for Richard Pryor in Mel Brooks' History of the World, Part I (1981), where he immediately displayed his sharp comic abilities. Other solid roles followed over the next decade: an unorthodox coroner in Michael Wadleigh's urban thriller Wolfen (1981); a nightclub dancer in Francis Ford Coppola's The Cotton Club (1984); an American defector to the Soviet Union in Taylor Hackford's overheated melodrama White Nights (1985); a wise-cracking cop in Peter Hyam's Running Scared (1986), and as the fast-talking con artist Goldy in Bill Duke's underrated A Rage in Harlem (1991). He returned to Broadway in 1992 for his biggest triumph, a portrayal of Jelly Roll Morton, the famed jazz composer, in Jelly's Last Jam and earned a Tony Award in the process. A few more film appearances came in the '90's, most memorably in Forest Whitaker's Waiting to Exhale (1995), but Hines found a new lease on his career when he appeared on the small screen. He played a single father in a fine, if short-lived sitcom The Gregory Hines Show (1997-98); was popular as Ben Doucette, a love interest for Grace in the hugely popular show Will & Grace for two seasons (1999-2001); and received strong critical notice for his moving take as Bill "Bojangles" Robinson in the television film Bojangles (2001) that he also produced. His last televised appearance was in June 2002, when he co-hosted the Tony Awards with Bernadette Peters. In addition to his father and brother, he is survived by his fiancee Negrita Jayde; a daughter, Daria Hines; a son, Zach; a stepdaughter, Jessica Koslow; and a grandson. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 22, 1985

Began shooting July 23, 1984.

Released in United States Fall November 22, 1985