Unholy Love


1h 17m 1932

Film Details

Also Known As
Indecent, Madame Bovary
Release Date
Jun 1, 1932
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Allied Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
State Rights
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Madame Bovary , by Gustave Flaubert (Paris, 1857)

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m

Synopsis

Jerry Gregory, the son of prominent physician, Dr. Daniel Gregory, marries Sheila Bailey, a dancer, despite his father's hope that he would marry Jane Bradford, a woman of his own class. When Jerry and Sheila return to their estate in Rye, New York, after their honeymoon, no one from the Gregory's social set comes to visit. Sheila is ostracized until her handsome neighbor, Simmington, offers to teach her to play tennis and bets his writer friend, Alex Stockmar, that he can win Sheila's amorous attentions. Sheila finally goes out with Jerry and, after one of Jane's friends insults her, joins Alex at his table. A love affair ensues and Sheila purchases a cottage in which to stage her rendezvous. Meanwhile, Sheila's father-in-law, Dan, befriends her, and when a bill arrives for her cottage, he pays the loan, but investigates. Aware of Sheila's infidelity, Dan confronts her about Alex and she confesses she loves him, and Dan urges her to protect Jerry. Alex then writes Sheila a good-bye note and she threatens suicide to Jane, who follows her in her car until Sheila plummets over a bridge. Jane tells the police that it was an accident, but Dan knows that it was suicide. Jane then burns Alex's good-bye note and both pledge never to tell Jerry of the affair or the suicide.

Film Details

Also Known As
Indecent, Madame Bovary
Release Date
Jun 1, 1932
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Allied Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
State Rights
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Madame Bovary , by Gustave Flaubert (Paris, 1857)

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 17m

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Onscreen credits incorrectly spell Lyle Talbot's name as "Lysle." A news item in Film Daily on May 16, 1932 stated that M. H. Hoffman, president of Allied Pictures, had decided to change this film's early title, Madame Bovary, to Indecent, in order to avoid giving exhibitors the impression that the film was a costume picture, which were thought to have little box-office value at the time. On May 17, 1932, Film Daily further reported that director Albert Ray had strong objections to the title change. The film was later renamed Unholy Love, and the setting was updated to the twentieth century United States. Although a copyright statement appears on the viewed print, the title is not listed in the copyright register. Motion Picture Herald and Film Daily credit Mildred Johnston with editing, although L. R. Brown is listed on the film. Among the many filmed adaptations of Gustave Flaubert's novel are the 1934 Jean Renoir-directed French film starring Valentine Tessier and Pierre Renoir; the 1937 German film directed by Gerhard Lamprecht and starring Pola Negri; the 1949 M-G-M film diected by Vincente Minnelli and starring Jennifer Jones and James Mason; the 1969 West Germany-Italian production Madame Bovary (Play the Game or Leave the Bed), directed by John Scott and starring Edwige Fenech; and the BBC/Time-Life production televised as part of PBS's Masterpiece Theatre in 1976, directed by Rodney Bennett and starring Francesca Annis and Tom Conti.