Under Strange Flags


1h 4m 1937

Brief Synopsis

It's 1914 in Mexico and Tom Kenyon is trying to safely transport a load of silver. General Barranca who is battling Panch Villa wants the silver. Villa's Captain is secretely working for Barranca and he convinces Villa that Tom is one of Barranca'a men and should be shot. The pleading of Tom's mother helps Tom and Villa become friends and he is released. But when Tom returns Villa is not there and the Captain orders his immediate execution.

Film Details

Also Known As
Beyond Victory, South of Sonora
Release Date
Jan 1937
Premiere Information
New York opening: 16 Aug 1937
Production Company
Crescent Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Crescent Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Nogales, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 4m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,771ft (7 reels)

Synopsis

Tom Kenyon and his friend Tequila ride with a pack train carrying silver from the La Paloma silver mine in Mexico. Nearby, the armies of General Barranca and Pancho Villa battle. Tom's mother waits for his return at home with Dolores de Vargas and Dolores' brother Denny. Denny is eager to join Barranca's army and plans to offer Tom's silver to the general. Meanwhile, the pack train is spotted by both Villa and Barranca. While the two armies fight each other, Tom and Tequila escape with their mules. Having hidden the silver, Tom returns home and urges his mother, Dolores and Denny to flee across the border. They then learn that Denny, wearing the uniform of Barranca's army, has been captured by Villa's men, and Tom and Tequila go after him. Morales, an agent of Barranca's who is acting as a spy in Villa's camp, is warned that no harm must come to Denny before he turns over the silver to Barranca. When Tom shows up at the camp, Morales releases Denny and replaces him with Tom. Villa holds a court-martial, and Tom is condemned to death. Mrs. Kenyon then confronts Villa and demands her son's release. Intimidated by her righteous anger, Villa agrees to release Tom, after he gives his word of honor that he will return after making a visit to his mother. When Tom returns home, Barranca and Denny demand that he show them where the silver is hidden. To rescue Tom and Denny, Tequila attaches firecrackers to his cow and sets them off, which makes Barranca's men believe that Villa's army is approaching. Tom escapes in the confusion and returns to Villa's camp to ask for help. He reveals that Morales is a double agent, and after Villa saves the people of La Paloma, Tom gives him the silver.

Film Details

Also Known As
Beyond Victory, South of Sonora
Release Date
Jan 1937
Premiere Information
New York opening: 16 Aug 1937
Production Company
Crescent Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Crescent Pictures Corp.
Country
United States
Location
Nogales, California, United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 4m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
5,771ft (7 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of this film were South of Sonora and Beyond Victory. The latter title was also the working title of another Tom Keene Crescent picture, Raw Timber, released in July 1937. February 1937 Hollywood Reporter news items state that Frank Melford was to direct three days of location work on Beyond Victory at Nogales, CA in the desert and that Jaime Saenz had been added to the cast. It is presumed that the news item referred to this film, although no information has been located to determine whether any filming did take place in Nogales, or if Saenz worked on the film. A March 1937 Hollywood Reporter news item notes that production was held up due to an "inability to find a substitute feminine lead for Rita Hayworth." According to a news item in Film Daily on May 19, 1937, Bennett Cohen was to collaborate with Mary Ireland on the screenplay for a film entitled Beyond Victory, that was to be the final picture "of Crescent's current series of Tom Keene starrers." As Under Strage Flags was completed in mid-Apr, it is probable that the news item refers to the film Raw Timber, that was produced in late May 1937.