Two Tickets to Broadway


1h 46m 1951
Two Tickets to Broadway

Brief Synopsis

A small-town girl finds love on the road to Broadway stardom.

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Release Date
Nov 1951
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 1 Nov 1951; New York opening: 21 Nov 1951
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9,572ft

Synopsis

On a New York-bound bus, three young entertainers, S. F. "Foxy" Rogers, Joyce Campbell and Hannah Holbrook, curse their agent, Lew Conway, for booking them into a showboat revue in Vermont, which flopped after three days. Broke and hungry, the women eagerly greet Broadway hopeful Nancy Peterson, who boards the bus in Pelican Falls after a rousing sendoff, and share her box lunch. At the New York bus terminal, Nancy parts ways with the women, just as a discouraged singer, Dan Carter, arrives to catch a bus bound for home. Dan's fast-talking agent, Lew, rushes in to stop him from boarding by lying that the Vermont revue is a hit and needs a new leading man. As Dan is leaving the station with Lew, Nancy, who has discovered that her suitcase is missing, spots what she mistakenly believes is her luggage in Dan's hands and calls for the police. Nancy soon is reunited with her suitcase and apologizes, but when Dan graciously hails Nancy a taxi, the two suitcases are inadvertently switched. Later, armed with her bag, Dan tracks Nancy to a show business boardinghouse and learns that she has much in common with him. Dan then invites Nancy for a walk in Central Park and counsels her not to trust sophisticated, city-bred men. At Lew's place, meanwhile, Hannah, his long-suffering girl friend, berates Lew for his conniving ways, but becomes excited when he gets an idea to persuade Leo and Harry, owners of a Broadway delicatessen, to invest in a television act featuring Dan and the women. To that end, Lew arranges for actor Willard Glendon to impersonate Dennis McGiven, the producer of singer Bob Crosby's television show, and approach Dan in the deli. Glendon states that he admires Dan's voice and suggests that if he works up an act with some girls, they will be all but guaranteed a spot on Crosby's show. Leo and Harry witness Glendon's offer, and Dan and Lew convince them to sponsor the act. Nancy, who has joined the group, relays the good news to her parents in Pelican Falls, and soon the local newspaper is trumpeting her imminent television debut. Over the next few weeks, the group hones their act and Dan and Nancy fall in love. Lew, meanwhile, tries to see McGiven repeatedly, but is turned away. Just as Dan and the others begin to wonder if they will get their audition, Lew has Glendon show up at rehearsal posing as McGiven to announce that he has arranged for them to perform the act at a benefit, which Crosby is to attend. Although the benefit goes well, Glendon informs the group that Crosby is not interested in hiring them because Dan is too good a singer. The next day, an outraged Nancy storms onto Crosby's television studio set and denounces the singer. When a confused Crosby introduces Nancy to the real McGiven, however, Nancy runs off in tears. Humiliated and broken, Nancy then packs and heads for the bus station. At the same time, Dan shows up at the television studio to confront Crosby and learns that McGiven has been trying to contact him for months and would like him to appear on the show. Having finally gained admittance to the studio, Lew overhears Crosby say that he cannot use Dan on that night's show because he has already filled with spot with a French acrobatic team. Posing as a makeup artist, Lew locks the Frenchmen in a room, forcing Crosby to book Dan. With only an hour until air time, Lew discovers that Nancy is on a bus bound for home and jumps on board to retrieve her. Nancy refuses to believe Lew at first, but when the bus passes by a store selling televisions and she sees Dan singing opera on Crosby's show, she and Lew hop off and rush to the studio. Nancy arrives just in time to join Dan, Hannah, Foxy and Joyce on stage, and after their triumphant debut, she and Dan enjoy a long kiss.

Cast

Tony Martin

Dan Carter

Janet Leigh

Nancy Peterson

Gloria Dehaven

Hannah Holbrook

Eddie Bracken

Lew Conway

Ann Miller

Joyce Campbell

Barbara Lawrence

S. F. "Foxy" Rogers

Joe Smith

Harry

Charles Dale

Leo

Taylor Holmes

Willard Glendon

Buddy Baer

Sailor

Bob Crosby

Himself

The Charlivels

Jane Easton

Girl

Shirley Tegge

Girl

Martha O'brian

Girl

Lucy Knoch

Girl

Rosalee Calvert

Girl

Joan Shawlee

Girl

Joan Barton

Girl

Shirley Whitney

Girl

Marilyn Johnson

Girl

Barbara Freking

Girl

Mona Knox

Girl

Rosemary Knighton

Girl

Marie Thomas

Girl

Kathy Case

Girl

Eileen Coghlan

Girl

Joy Lansing

Redhead

Linda Williams

Brunette

Ann Zika

Blonde

Libby Taylor

Maid

Gwen Caldwell

Pretty girl

Jean Corbett

Chorus girl

Helen Hayden

Chorus girl

Claudette Thornton

Chorus girl

Hazel Shaw

Chorus girl

Barbara Logan

Chorus girl

Charlotte Alpert

Chorus girl

Victoria Lynn

Chorus girl

Jeane Dyer

Chorus girl

Pat Hall

Chorus girl

Vera Miles

Chorus girl

Maura Donatt

Chorus girl

Frieda Stoll

Wardrobe woman

Billy Curtis

Midget

Mike Lally

Man with tux

Bennett Green

Man with tux

Larry Barton

Waiter

Gene Banks

Usher

Fred L. Gillett

Bus driver

Sid Tomack

Bus driver

Norval Mitchell

Mr. Peterson

Helen Spring

Mrs. Peterson

Vincent Graeff

Cheerleader

June Mccall

Showgirl

Noreen Mortensen

Showgirl

Joel Robinson

Showgirl

Georgia Clancy

Showgirl

Elizabeth Burgess

Showgirl

Barbara Thatcher

Showgirl

Carol Brewster

Showgirl

Shirley Buchanan

Showgirl

Mildred Carroll

Showgirl

Mara Corday

Showgirl

Carmelita Eskew

Showgirl

Joan Evans

Showgirl

Joanne Frank

Showgirl

Mary Ellen Gleason

Showgirl

Joan Jordan

Showgirl

Lola Kendrick

Showgirl

Shirley Kimball

Showgirl

Evelyn Lovequist

Showgirl

Kathleen O'malley

Showgirl

June Paul

Showgirl

Marylin Symons

Showgirl

Beverly Thomas

Showgirl

Joan Whitney

Showgirl

Barbara Worthington

Showgirl

Maxine Willis

Secretary

Joann Arnold

Secretary

Ann Melton

Woman in evening gown

Ann Kramer

Woman in evening gown

Marg Pemberton

Hotel guest

John Sheehan

Desk clerk

Ann Kimball

Western Union girl

Don Blackman

Porter

Donald Macbride

Bus terminal guard

Jimmy Dundee

Doorman

Herman Cantor

Doorman

Lillian West

Old lady

Jack Gargan

Dispatcher

Isabel Randolph

Housekeeper

Miles Shepard

Policeman

Bob Thom

Policeman

Ralph Hodges

Hot rod passenger

Michael Pierce

Hot rod passenger

John Gallaudet

Dennis McGiven

Millicent Deming

Receptionist

Jerry Hausner

Agent

Suzanne Ames

Beautiful girl

Anne O'neal

Lester Dorr

Charlete Hardy

Garry Owen

Tony Felice

Marty Rhiel

Duris De Jong

Gene Marshall

Marie Allison

George Nader

Film Details

Genre
Comedy
Romance
Musical
Release Date
Nov 1951
Premiere Information
Los Angeles opening: 1 Nov 1951; New York opening: 21 Nov 1951
Production Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
RKO Radio Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 46m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
9,572ft

Award Nominations

Best Sound

1952

Articles

Two Tickets to Broadway


The famously eccentric millionaire aviator/film-maker Howard Hughes had acquired a controlling interest in RKO in 1948. By 1951, Hughes' obsessive tinkering with the studio had caused so much chaos that film production had slowed down almost to a standstill.

During the same period, Janet Leigh's career had taken off, and she was one of MGM's busiest ingenues. Two Tickets to Broadway (1951) was her final film on a three-picture loanout to RKO. What should have been a simple (if all-star) musical of young showbiz hopefuls trying to get their break on a big-time television show turned into a much-delayed, months-long saga, in large part due to Hughes' over-involved attention to detail, and his efforts to seduce Leigh.

In Two Tickets to Broadway, Leigh plays a small-town girl who heads for New York. On the bus, she meets singer Tony Martin, and three other young hopefuls: Ann Miller, Gloria DeHaven, and Barbara Lawrence, and the trio becomes a quartet, finding lodgings at a theatrical boarding house. Eddie Bracken plays an inept agent, who tries to book them on a television show starring bandleader Bob Crosby, brother of Bing. The plot had been a cliche since the late 1920's "all talking! all singing! all dancing!" era, but it was freshened by the attractive young cast, and by substituting television stardom for Broadway success. The film had a generous dose of musical numbers, with songs by Jule Stein and Leo Robin, Rodgers and Hart, and even grand opera. The cast also featured vaudeville veterans Smith and Dale playing a pair of deli owners. It was one of their rare film appearances, and also their final one. Also playing bit parts in Two Tickets to Broadway were future stars Vera Miles, Mamie Van Doren (as Joan Olander, her real name), and George Nader.

As pre-production for Two Tickets to Broadway got underway, Leigh suggested that the hot young dance team of Marge and Gower Champion be hired to choreograph. She didn't know that the Champions had just been signed to a contract by MGM. However, the tenacious Hughes wangled a loan-out, and the Champions began working to turn non-dancer Leigh into a credible hoofer. Hughes had been trying to date Leigh for months without success. She was not interested, and kept turning him down, but finally gave in and agreed to a date if her parents to come along. Hughes complied, but after that date, she refused any more. Hughes kept pursuing, and kept delaying the start of production. One of Hughes' delaying tactics was how he dealt with sets. The film was being made at the RKO studios, and Hughes' office was at the Goldwyn studios. Instead of driving the few miles between the two studios to see the sets, Hughes insisted that the sets be dismantled at RKO, rebuilt at Goldw! yn so he could see and approve them, then dismantled again and rebuilt at RKO.

Leigh began dating the dance assistant she was working with, and Hughes assigned him to work with Martin instead. (Martin had his own personal experience with Hughes' obsessive pursuit of women ¿ in the late 1940s, Hughes had tried unsuccessfully to date Cyd Charisse, whom Martin was dating at the time, and later married). As the months dragged on, Leigh started dating Tony Curtis, and that romance turned serious, in spite of Hughes' attempts to prevent it. With no start of production in sight for Two Tickets to Broadway, Leigh returned to MGM to appear in It's a Big Country (1952). The Champions also had to return to MGM, to begin work on Show Boat (1951). They were replaced by Busby Berkeley. Finally, Leigh told Hughes she was going to New York, and wouldn't return until production began on Two Tickets to Broadway . Hughes finally relented, and filming began. About the only mishap during production was that Ann Miller fell off a huge pyramid during shooting of one of dance numbers. She suffered a back injury, and had to be hospitalized.

In spite of the delays, Two Tickets to Broadway turned out to be a pleasant diversion, with attractive players and appealing musical numbers. Janet Leigh married Tony Curtis, and the couple was a favorite of the fan magazines and public for the duration of their 11-year marriage. Howard Hughes became stranger and more reclusive, and eventually drove RKO into oblivion. He sold the studio in the mid-1950s.

Director: James V. Kern
Producer: Howard Hughes (uncredited), Jerry Wald, Norman Krasna
Screenplay: Sid Silvers, Hal Kanter, based on a story by Sammy Cahn
Cinematography: Edward Kronjager, Harry D. Wild
Editor: Harry Marker
Costume Design: Michael Woulfe
Art Direction: Albert S. D'Agostino, Carroll Clark; sets, Darrell Silvera, Harley Miller
Music: Jule Styne & Leo Robin; Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart; Leon Carr, Al Hoffman, & Leo Corday; Ruggero Leoncavallo; Sammy Cahn & Bob Crosby
Principal Cast: Tony Martin (Dan Carter), Janet Leigh (Nancy Peterson), Gloria DeHaven (Hannah Holbrook), Eddie Bracken (Lew Conway), Ann Miller (Joyce Campbell), Barbara Lawrence (S.F. Rogers), Bob Crosby (Himself), Joe Smith (Harry), Charles Dale (Leo). C-107m. Closed Captioning.

by Margarita Landazuri
Two Tickets To Broadway

Two Tickets to Broadway

The famously eccentric millionaire aviator/film-maker Howard Hughes had acquired a controlling interest in RKO in 1948. By 1951, Hughes' obsessive tinkering with the studio had caused so much chaos that film production had slowed down almost to a standstill. During the same period, Janet Leigh's career had taken off, and she was one of MGM's busiest ingenues. Two Tickets to Broadway (1951) was her final film on a three-picture loanout to RKO. What should have been a simple (if all-star) musical of young showbiz hopefuls trying to get their break on a big-time television show turned into a much-delayed, months-long saga, in large part due to Hughes' over-involved attention to detail, and his efforts to seduce Leigh. In Two Tickets to Broadway, Leigh plays a small-town girl who heads for New York. On the bus, she meets singer Tony Martin, and three other young hopefuls: Ann Miller, Gloria DeHaven, and Barbara Lawrence, and the trio becomes a quartet, finding lodgings at a theatrical boarding house. Eddie Bracken plays an inept agent, who tries to book them on a television show starring bandleader Bob Crosby, brother of Bing. The plot had been a cliche since the late 1920's "all talking! all singing! all dancing!" era, but it was freshened by the attractive young cast, and by substituting television stardom for Broadway success. The film had a generous dose of musical numbers, with songs by Jule Stein and Leo Robin, Rodgers and Hart, and even grand opera. The cast also featured vaudeville veterans Smith and Dale playing a pair of deli owners. It was one of their rare film appearances, and also their final one. Also playing bit parts in Two Tickets to Broadway were future stars Vera Miles, Mamie Van Doren (as Joan Olander, her real name), and George Nader. As pre-production for Two Tickets to Broadway got underway, Leigh suggested that the hot young dance team of Marge and Gower Champion be hired to choreograph. She didn't know that the Champions had just been signed to a contract by MGM. However, the tenacious Hughes wangled a loan-out, and the Champions began working to turn non-dancer Leigh into a credible hoofer. Hughes had been trying to date Leigh for months without success. She was not interested, and kept turning him down, but finally gave in and agreed to a date if her parents to come along. Hughes complied, but after that date, she refused any more. Hughes kept pursuing, and kept delaying the start of production. One of Hughes' delaying tactics was how he dealt with sets. The film was being made at the RKO studios, and Hughes' office was at the Goldwyn studios. Instead of driving the few miles between the two studios to see the sets, Hughes insisted that the sets be dismantled at RKO, rebuilt at Goldw! yn so he could see and approve them, then dismantled again and rebuilt at RKO. Leigh began dating the dance assistant she was working with, and Hughes assigned him to work with Martin instead. (Martin had his own personal experience with Hughes' obsessive pursuit of women ¿ in the late 1940s, Hughes had tried unsuccessfully to date Cyd Charisse, whom Martin was dating at the time, and later married). As the months dragged on, Leigh started dating Tony Curtis, and that romance turned serious, in spite of Hughes' attempts to prevent it. With no start of production in sight for Two Tickets to Broadway, Leigh returned to MGM to appear in It's a Big Country (1952). The Champions also had to return to MGM, to begin work on Show Boat (1951). They were replaced by Busby Berkeley. Finally, Leigh told Hughes she was going to New York, and wouldn't return until production began on Two Tickets to Broadway . Hughes finally relented, and filming began. About the only mishap during production was that Ann Miller fell off a huge pyramid during shooting of one of dance numbers. She suffered a back injury, and had to be hospitalized. In spite of the delays, Two Tickets to Broadway turned out to be a pleasant diversion, with attractive players and appealing musical numbers. Janet Leigh married Tony Curtis, and the couple was a favorite of the fan magazines and public for the duration of their 11-year marriage. Howard Hughes became stranger and more reclusive, and eventually drove RKO into oblivion. He sold the studio in the mid-1950s. Director: James V. Kern Producer: Howard Hughes (uncredited), Jerry Wald, Norman Krasna Screenplay: Sid Silvers, Hal Kanter, based on a story by Sammy Cahn Cinematography: Edward Kronjager, Harry D. Wild Editor: Harry Marker Costume Design: Michael Woulfe Art Direction: Albert S. D'Agostino, Carroll Clark; sets, Darrell Silvera, Harley Miller Music: Jule Styne & Leo Robin; Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart; Leon Carr, Al Hoffman, & Leo Corday; Ruggero Leoncavallo; Sammy Cahn & Bob Crosby Principal Cast: Tony Martin (Dan Carter), Janet Leigh (Nancy Peterson), Gloria DeHaven (Hannah Holbrook), Eddie Bracken (Lew Conway), Ann Miller (Joyce Campbell), Barbara Lawrence (S.F. Rogers), Bob Crosby (Himself), Joe Smith (Harry), Charles Dale (Leo). C-107m. Closed Captioning. by Margarita Landazuri

Quotes

Trivia

The roles played by Charles Dale (I) and Joe Smith (II) were orginally intended for Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, who had to drop out of the film due to an illness contracted by Laurel while filming Atoll K (1950).

Notes

In the scene in which the acrobatics of the French group The Charlivels is shown, slow motion photography is used. Hollywood Reporter news items add the following information about the production: In September 1949, Ken Englund was announced as the film's scriptwriter and Alex Gottlieb as producer. Englund's contribution to the final film, if any, has not been determined. In April 1950, production was delayed for five months while a leading man was secured. Gottlieb was replaced as producer by Danny Dare in May, but in mid-August 1950, Dare left the production because of prior commitments. RKO head Howard Hughes then took over as producer. RKO borrowed Janet Leigh and Ann Miller from M-G-M. Dancers Marge and Gower Champion, who were also borrowed from M-G-M, coached Leigh during the delay. Virginia Carroll and Manny Harmon were announced as cast members, but their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Shirley Whitney, who plays a "girl" in the film, originally was hired as Janet Leigh's stand-in. Exterior street scenes were shot on Paramount's back lot. In mid-January 1951, production moved from RKO's Gower Street studios to the RKO-Pathé Studios in Culver City, CA.
       Two Tickets to Broadway marked the screen debut of actress Vera Miles. It also marked the first time that Miles and Leigh, who played sisters in Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 film Psycho (see entry above), appeared together. The film received an Academy Award nomination for Best Sound Recording. Modern sources note that the picture lost $1,150,000 at the box office. Modern sources also state that during production, Hughes ordered the sets brought to the Samuel Goldwyn Studios, where Hughes spent most of his time, and had them assembled for his approval. The sets then were broken down and reassembled on the RKO lot a few miles away.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall November 1951

Released in United States Fall November 1951