2010


1h 54m 1984
2010

Brief Synopsis

In this sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey, a U.S.-Soviet crew investigates a mysterious monolith orbiting Jupiter.

Film Details

Also Known As
2.010, odisea dos, 2010: Odyssey Two, 2010: The Year We Make Contact, 2010: Året då vi får kontakt
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
Adaptation
Sequel
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Synopsis

A joint American-Soviet space mission sets off to uncover the mystery of the "Discovery" ship that was sabotaged by HAL, the computer, in the earlier film.

Crew

Ross Albert

Associate Editor

Jon Alberti

Other

Jarek Alfer

Miniatures

Barbara Allen

Other

Jill Allen

Other

Lance Anderson

Other

Larz Anderson

Other

Richard L Anderson

Sound Editor

James M Arnett

Stunt Coordinator

Philip Barberio

Other

John Baron

Lighting Technician

Bill Beasley

Assistant Director

David Beasley

Miniatures

Michael J. Benavente

Sound Editor

Jon Berg

Other

Gary Bierend

Miniatures

David Blitstein

Special Effects Assistant

Brent Boates

Consultant

Albert Brenner

Production Designer

Kris Brown

Other

Raul A Bruce

Boom Operator

Conrad Buff

Editor

Jim Burk

Stunts

Gene S Cantamessa

Sound

James Christopher

Sound Editor

Arthur C. Clarke

Source Material (From Novel)

Arthur C. Clarke

Screenplay

Bob Cole

Other

Richard Coleman

Animator

Randall William Cook

Other

Charles Cowles

Other

Margaret Craig-chang

Animator

Tom Culnan

Other

Katharine Curtis

Production Coordinator

Alan B. Curtiss

Assistant Director

Carlos Delarios

Sound

Ken Dudderar

Other

Barbara Dunning

Assistant Editor

Richard Edlund

Visual Effects Supervisor

Leslie Ekker

Miniatures

Andy Evans

Special Effects Assistant

Leslie Falkinburg

Accountant

John V. Fante

Camera Operator

Don E Fauntleroy

Camera Assistant

Gunnar Ferdinandsen

Other

Wendie L Fischer

Animator

Donald Flick

Sound Editor

Helmut Franz

Music Conductor

Kent Gebo

Miniatures

Arthur Gelb

Graphics

Adam Gelbart

Miniatures

Bruno George

Other

Bryson Gerard

Miniatures

Gregory M Gerlich

Assistant Editor

Ralph Gerling

Camera Operator

Mia Goldman

Editor

Ron Gress

Visual Effects

Rhonda Gunner

Video Playback

James Halty

Stunts

Warren Hamilton

Sound Editor

David Hardberger

Motion Control

Bob Harman

Stunts

Craig P Herring

Assistant Editor

Karl Herrmann

Photography

Rebecca Heskes

Animator

Freddie Hice

Stunts

Clark Higgins

Video

Jack Hinkle

Assistant Editor

Richard Hollander

Video

Mike Hoover

Motion Control

Mike Hosch

Other

Craig Hundley

Music Producer

Craig Hundley

Music Arranger

Peter Hyams

Producer

Peter Hyams

Screenplay

Peter Hyams

Director Of Photography

Peter Hyams

Dp/Cinematographer

Mario Iscovich

Location Manager

John James

Other

Jamie Jardine

Other

Jerry Jeffress

Other

George Jenson

Art Director

Bobby Johnston

Mechanical Special Effects

Stephen Jongeward

Production Associate

Jimmy Kessler

Costumes

Michael J Kohut

Sound

Robin Kolb

Other

Stanley Kubrick

Other

Sherman Labby

Production

John Lambert

Camera Operator

Mike Lawler

Camera Operator

Lynda Lemon

Production Supervisor

Robin Leyden

Other

Gyorgy Ligeti

Music

Joanna C. Lovetti

Associate Editor

Neil A Machlis

Production Manager

Neil A Machlis

Associate Producer

Ann E Martin

Assistant Editor

Peter Martinez

Video

Mary Mason

Other

Mark Matthew

Other

Tom May

Key Grip

Nancy Mcardle

Costumes

Vivian Mcateer

Hair

Bruce V. Mcbroom

Photography

Patrick Mcclung

Miniatures

Greg Mcmurray

Video

Syd Mead

Visual Effects

L Mark Medernach

Production Associate

John C. Meier

Stunts

Vince Melandri

Adr Editor

Dennis Michaelson

Assistant Editor

Henry Millar

Special Effects Supervisor

James D. Mitchell

Editor

Michele Moen

Matte Painter

Ronald B Moore

Titles And Opticals

Gary Morgan

Stunts

Thaine Morris

Digital Effects Supervisor

Bill Neil

Camera Operator

James Nelson

Advisor

Patricia Norris

Costume Designer

Marty November

Assistant Editor

Ray O'reilly

Sound

Tom Pahk

Miniatures

Bill Parker

Lighting

Penny Perry

Casting

Randy Peters

Transportation Coordinator

Gary Platek

Other

George Polkinghorne

Other

John Pospisil

Sound Editor

George Pryor

Miniatures

Samuel Recinos

Animator

Peggy Regan

Animator

Robin Reilly

Miniatures

Arthur Repola

Editor

Pat Repola

Film Lab

Aaron Rochin

Sound

Mic Rodgers

Stunts

Pete Romano

Camera Assistant

Milius Romyn

Miniatures

Jim Rygiel

Digital Effects Supervisor

William Saracino

Music Editor

Marshall Schlom

Script Supervisor

Dennis Schultz

Miniatures

Jonathan Seay

Motion Control

Nicholas Seldon

Miniatures

David Shire

Music

David Shire

Music Producer

David Shwartz

Other

Tom Silveroli

Miniatures

Rick Simpson

Set Decorator

Robert Spurlock

Other

Dave Stewart

Photography

David Stone

Sound Editor

Richard Strauss

Music

Dale Strumpell

Sound Design

Jay Sweeney

Technical Advisor

Ken Swenson

Miniatures

Richard Terrile

Technical Advisor

Annick Therrien

Animator

Eusebio Torres

Animator

Paul Van Kamp

Other

Bruce Walkup

Costumes

Garry Waller

Animation Supervisor

Mary E Walter

Other

Steve Warner

Production Associate

Candace Wells

Transportation Captain

Terry Wendell

Animation Supervisor

Mark West

Other

Jody Westheimer

Camera Assistant

Kayte Westheimer

Accountant

Michael Westmore

Makeup Supervisor

Michael Wheeler

Assistant Camera Operator

Bob Wilcox

Other

Bess Wiley

Camera Assistant

Bob Wilson

Miniatures

Claire Wilson

Production Accountant

Marty Wunderlich

Props

Matthew Yuricich

Matte Painter

Stuart Ziff

Other

Jonathan A Zimbert

Associate Producer

Photo Collections

2010 - Color Scene Stills
Here are several color scene stills from 2010 (1984), the ambitious sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968).

Film Details

Also Known As
2.010, odisea dos, 2010: Odyssey Two, 2010: The Year We Make Contact, 2010: Året då vi får kontakt
MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Thriller
Adaptation
Sequel
Sci-Fi
Release Date
1984

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 54m

Award Nominations

Best Art Direction

1984
Albert Brenner

Best Costume Design

1984
Patricia Norris

Best Makeup

1984

Best Sound

1984

Best Visual Effects

1984

Articles

2010


It's no secret that sequels are often little more than calculated rehashes of popular movies, with extra emphasis placed on re-creating dialogue or bits of action that everyone talked about the first time around. But Peter Hyams' 2010 (1984), the long awaited follow-up to Stanley Kubrick's monumental classic, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), is a different beast altogether. It may well be the only sequel in movie history that was designed to explain the plot of its predecessor...not that everyone was clamoring for an answer.

2010's relatively straight-forward narrative picks up nine years after the first film ended. The United States government discovers that the Soviets are planning to travel to Jupiter to find out what happened to The Discovery, the doomed ship that served as a sort of metaphysical launching pad in 2001: A Space Odyssey. The Soviets eventually contact the U.S. and request that Heywood Floyd (Roy Scheider), the mastermind behind the original mission, accompany them on their journey. It's never explained how Floyd, who was played by William Sylvester in 2001, managed to transform himself into a completely different person between stories.

Floyd and his fellow American astronauts, Walter Curnow (John Lithgow) and Dr. Chandra (Bob Balaban), are welcome additions to the crew, mainly because the Russians have no working knowledge of the HAL 9000 computer that controls The Discovery. Fans of the first film, of course, realize that nobody knows exactly what's going on with HAL. (Note also that 2010 contains a guest appearance by HAL's sister, SAL 9000. SAL speaks with Candice Bergen's mellifluous voice, though Bergen is inexplicably billed in the credits as "Olga Mallsnerd.") Soviet-American political tensions - which were a reality at the time and now may be puzzling to today's viewers - add another dimension to the proceedings. Before it's all over, you may (or may not) have a better idea what Kubrick and co-writer Arthur C. Clarke were getting at with 2001.

One could debate whether there was a need to make 2010 at all. "I certainly would not have not thought of doing the film," Hyams admitted, "if I had not gotten the blessing of Kubrick." Though Kubrick gave Hyams the go-ahead, he always intended 2001: A Space Odyssey to operate somewhere beyond the realm of verbal explanation. The questions it raises aren't designed to be answered directly, since the film's "point" hinges on the unknowable mysteries of human consciousness. It's the kind of picture that can be viewed as profound, pretentious or incomprehensible depending on who's viewing it. Thus the sequel received a mixed reception; some people saw it and some people avoided it out of respect for Kubrick's original, mind-bending experience.

Clarke, for his part, was receptive when a nervous Hyams sent him the screenplay. "I felt like playing a few tricks on you - like a message from my secretary that I was last seen heading for the airport carrying a gun," he told him. However, Clarke added, "I'll say right away that it's a splendid job and you have brilliantly chiseled out the basic elements of the novel, besides adding quite a few of your own."

Whether or not Hyams succeeds in clarifying a deliberately unknowable film will hinge on your eagerness to abandon your personal interpretation of Kubrick's and Clarke's work. Regardless, 2010 can still be appreciated as a solidly entertaining piece of sci-fi, one that was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Sound, Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Makeup, and Best Visual effects.

Directed by: Peter Hyams
Screenplay: Peter Hyams, based on Arthur C. Clarke’s novel, 2010, Odyssey Two
Art Direction: Albert Brenner
Set Design: Rick Simpson
Cinematography: Peter Hyams
Editing: James Mitchell and Mia Goldman
Music: David Shire, Richard Strauss, and Gyorgi Ligeti
Special Effects: Henry Millar, Jr. and Richard Edlund
Costume Design: Patricia Norris
Principal Cast: Roy Scheider (Heywood Floyd), John Lithgow (Walter Curnow), Helen Mirren (Tanya Kirbuk), Bob Balaban (Dr. Chandra), Keir Dullea (David Bowman), Dana Elcar (Dimitri Moisevitch), Elya Baskin (Maxim Brailovsky).
C-116m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Paul Tatara
2010

2010

It's no secret that sequels are often little more than calculated rehashes of popular movies, with extra emphasis placed on re-creating dialogue or bits of action that everyone talked about the first time around. But Peter Hyams' 2010 (1984), the long awaited follow-up to Stanley Kubrick's monumental classic, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), is a different beast altogether. It may well be the only sequel in movie history that was designed to explain the plot of its predecessor...not that everyone was clamoring for an answer. 2010's relatively straight-forward narrative picks up nine years after the first film ended. The United States government discovers that the Soviets are planning to travel to Jupiter to find out what happened to The Discovery, the doomed ship that served as a sort of metaphysical launching pad in 2001: A Space Odyssey. The Soviets eventually contact the U.S. and request that Heywood Floyd (Roy Scheider), the mastermind behind the original mission, accompany them on their journey. It's never explained how Floyd, who was played by William Sylvester in 2001, managed to transform himself into a completely different person between stories. Floyd and his fellow American astronauts, Walter Curnow (John Lithgow) and Dr. Chandra (Bob Balaban), are welcome additions to the crew, mainly because the Russians have no working knowledge of the HAL 9000 computer that controls The Discovery. Fans of the first film, of course, realize that nobody knows exactly what's going on with HAL. (Note also that 2010 contains a guest appearance by HAL's sister, SAL 9000. SAL speaks with Candice Bergen's mellifluous voice, though Bergen is inexplicably billed in the credits as "Olga Mallsnerd.") Soviet-American political tensions - which were a reality at the time and now may be puzzling to today's viewers - add another dimension to the proceedings. Before it's all over, you may (or may not) have a better idea what Kubrick and co-writer Arthur C. Clarke were getting at with 2001. One could debate whether there was a need to make 2010 at all. "I certainly would not have not thought of doing the film," Hyams admitted, "if I had not gotten the blessing of Kubrick." Though Kubrick gave Hyams the go-ahead, he always intended 2001: A Space Odyssey to operate somewhere beyond the realm of verbal explanation. The questions it raises aren't designed to be answered directly, since the film's "point" hinges on the unknowable mysteries of human consciousness. It's the kind of picture that can be viewed as profound, pretentious or incomprehensible depending on who's viewing it. Thus the sequel received a mixed reception; some people saw it and some people avoided it out of respect for Kubrick's original, mind-bending experience. Clarke, for his part, was receptive when a nervous Hyams sent him the screenplay. "I felt like playing a few tricks on you - like a message from my secretary that I was last seen heading for the airport carrying a gun," he told him. However, Clarke added, "I'll say right away that it's a splendid job and you have brilliantly chiseled out the basic elements of the novel, besides adding quite a few of your own." Whether or not Hyams succeeds in clarifying a deliberately unknowable film will hinge on your eagerness to abandon your personal interpretation of Kubrick's and Clarke's work. Regardless, 2010 can still be appreciated as a solidly entertaining piece of sci-fi, one that was nominated for Academy Awards for Best Sound, Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design, Best Makeup, and Best Visual effects. Directed by: Peter Hyams Screenplay: Peter Hyams, based on Arthur C. Clarke’s novel, 2010, Odyssey Two Art Direction: Albert Brenner Set Design: Rick Simpson Cinematography: Peter Hyams Editing: James Mitchell and Mia Goldman Music: David Shire, Richard Strauss, and Gyorgi Ligeti Special Effects: Henry Millar, Jr. and Richard Edlund Costume Design: Patricia Norris Principal Cast: Roy Scheider (Heywood Floyd), John Lithgow (Walter Curnow), Helen Mirren (Tanya Kirbuk), Bob Balaban (Dr. Chandra), Keir Dullea (David Bowman), Dana Elcar (Dimitri Moisevitch), Elya Baskin (Maxim Brailovsky). C-116m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Paul Tatara

Winter/Spring Film Forum Schedule for 2010 - New York City's FILM FORUM Schedule for Winter/Spring 2010


Powell & Pressburger's THE RED SHOES
February 19 – 25 One Week Only!
New 35mm Restoration! Back By Popular Demand!
(1948) The Powell & Pressburger masterpiece, painstakingly restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive, in association with The Film Foundation, was Film Forum's biggest repertory hit of 2009. "Glorious! If you haven't seen it in a theater, jeté, don't walk." – David Edelstein, New York Magazine. Thelma Schoonmaker, wife of the late Michael Powell, will introduce the 7:00 screening on Friday, February 19.

Bob Rafelson's FIVE EASY PIECES
40th Anniversary!
February 26 – March 4
One week! New 35mm Restoration!
(1970) Supremely alienated oilfield roustabout/piano virtuoso Jack Nicholson (in his first Oscar-nominated performance) on the run from his well-bred roots, dallies with both blue-collar waitress Karen Black and his brother's classy fiancée; gives a lesson in highway greasy spoon etiquette to a rule-ridden waitress; tries to reconcile with his stroke-silenced dad; and tosses off a few other easy pieces by Chopin. "One of the best American films. A masterpiece of heartbreaking intensity!" – Roger Ebert.

VICTOR FLEMING
March 5 – 18 Two weeks!
22–film series spotlighting Hollywood director Victor Fleming (1889-1949), from his first films with silent stars Douglas Fairbanks and Clara Bow to his quintessential sound classics with Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman, and many others, including Red Dust, Bombshell, Treasure Island, Captains Courageous, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, and the two back-to-back films considered the apogee of the Hollywood movie, The Wizard of Oz and Gone With The Wind. Michael Sragow, author of the recent biography Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master, will appear in person to introduce several screenings. See attached pdf for complete schedule.

Joseph Losey's THE PROWLER
March 19 – 25
One week! New 35mm Restoration!
(1951) When Van Heflin's corrupt cop Webb Garwood takes a prowler call only to find neglected wife and failed actress Evelyn Keyes alone in an echoing Spanish house, he suddenly has law-breaking on his mind. Restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive. "A hallucinatory film noir. Losey's best film." – Dave Kehr.

Abbas Kiarostami's CLOSE-UP
20th Anniversary!
March 26 – April 1
One week! New 35mm Print!
(1990) A semi-employed movie nut is brought to trial after impersonating a famous Iranian film director and duping a gullible family, in the first of Kiarostami's Chinese box blurrings of documentary and fiction. Kiarostami filmed the real-life trial and the major participants (playing themselves in reenactments), with a climax that is pure vérité. "The postmodern masterpiece of the 90s." – David Fear, Time Out New York.

F. W. Murnau's SUNRISE
April 2 – 8
One week! New 35mm Print!
(1927) The idyllic marriage of George O'Brien and Janet Gaynor is threatened when he falls for a cigarette-smoking, jazz-loving vamp from the city - so hard that he starts contemplating murdering his wife. "Possibly the greatest achievement of both Murnau and the silent film." – Pauline Kael.

THE NEWSPAPER PICTURE
April 9 – May 6
Four weeks! All 35mm Prints!
4-week, 43-film series spotlighting newshounds, gossip columnists, sensation-seeking editors, and sob sisters. Films include Billy Wilder's Ace in the Hole, with Kirk Douglas; Mervyn LeRoy's Five Star Final, with Edward G. Robinson; Michael Curtiz's Front Page Woman, with Bette Davis; Deadline U.S.A., with Humphrey Bogart; Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor, Alexander Mackendrick's Sweet Smell of Success, with Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis; Frank Capra's Meet John Doe, with Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck; Howard Hawks' His Girl Friday, with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell, based on Hecht & MacArthur's The Front Page; and Lewis Milestone's extremely rare original 1931 version, starring Adolphe Menjou and Pat O'Brien. Special guests during the festival will include Brooke Gladstone (co-host of NPR'S On the Media), Randy Cohen ("The Ethicist" of The New York Times), V.A. Musetto (New York Post), and writer James Lardner, son of screenwriter Ring Lardner Jr. and grandson of humorist Ring Lardner. See attached pdf for complete schedule.

LEE TRACY
Tuesdays, April 13 – May 4 (Plus Monday, April 19)
Tuesday nights during The Newspaper Picture festival are devoted to Lee Tracy (1898-1968), who set the gold standard for the fast-talking newspaperman of the 1930s (he was Hildy Johnson in the original stage production of The Front Page), in such films as Blessed Event, The Strange Love of Molly Louvain and Love is a Racket.

SPECIAL EVENT
Josef von Sternberg's THE DOCKS OF NEW YORK & Selected Shorts in the National Film Registry
Monday, March 22
Dock worker George Bancroft marries - or does he? - waterfront hooker Betty Compson after rescuing her from suicide, in von Sternberg's first expressionist masterpiece, inducted into the National Film Registry in 1999. Daniel Eagan, author of America's Film Legacy: the Authoritative Guide to the Landmark Movies in the National Film Registry, will introduce the program, which will also include selected silent and sound shorts from the Registry. Live piano accompaniment by Steve Sterner.

SPECIAL EVENT
BILL FORSYTH
Thursdays, April 15 & 22
Three films by award-winning Scottish writer-director Bill Forsyth: Gregory's Girl (1981), Local Hero (1983), and the underrated Housekeeping (1987). Mr. Forsyth will be interviewed onstage by Jim Healy, assistant film curator of George Eastman House, following the screening of Housekeeping on April 15.

Winter/Spring Film Forum Schedule for 2010 - New York City's FILM FORUM Schedule for Winter/Spring 2010

Powell & Pressburger's THE RED SHOES February 19 – 25 One Week Only! New 35mm Restoration! Back By Popular Demand! (1948) The Powell & Pressburger masterpiece, painstakingly restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive, in association with The Film Foundation, was Film Forum's biggest repertory hit of 2009. "Glorious! If you haven't seen it in a theater, jeté, don't walk." – David Edelstein, New York Magazine. Thelma Schoonmaker, wife of the late Michael Powell, will introduce the 7:00 screening on Friday, February 19. Bob Rafelson's FIVE EASY PIECES 40th Anniversary! February 26 – March 4 One week! New 35mm Restoration! (1970) Supremely alienated oilfield roustabout/piano virtuoso Jack Nicholson (in his first Oscar-nominated performance) on the run from his well-bred roots, dallies with both blue-collar waitress Karen Black and his brother's classy fiancée; gives a lesson in highway greasy spoon etiquette to a rule-ridden waitress; tries to reconcile with his stroke-silenced dad; and tosses off a few other easy pieces by Chopin. "One of the best American films. A masterpiece of heartbreaking intensity!" – Roger Ebert. VICTOR FLEMING March 5 – 18 Two weeks! 22–film series spotlighting Hollywood director Victor Fleming (1889-1949), from his first films with silent stars Douglas Fairbanks and Clara Bow to his quintessential sound classics with Clark Gable, Jean Harlow, Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman, and many others, including Red Dust, Bombshell, Treasure Island, Captains Courageous, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, and the two back-to-back films considered the apogee of the Hollywood movie, The Wizard of Oz and Gone With The Wind. Michael Sragow, author of the recent biography Victor Fleming: An American Movie Master, will appear in person to introduce several screenings. See attached pdf for complete schedule. Joseph Losey's THE PROWLER March 19 – 25 One week! New 35mm Restoration! (1951) When Van Heflin's corrupt cop Webb Garwood takes a prowler call only to find neglected wife and failed actress Evelyn Keyes alone in an echoing Spanish house, he suddenly has law-breaking on his mind. Restored by the UCLA Film & Television Archive. "A hallucinatory film noir. Losey's best film." – Dave Kehr. Abbas Kiarostami's CLOSE-UP 20th Anniversary! March 26 – April 1 One week! New 35mm Print! (1990) A semi-employed movie nut is brought to trial after impersonating a famous Iranian film director and duping a gullible family, in the first of Kiarostami's Chinese box blurrings of documentary and fiction. Kiarostami filmed the real-life trial and the major participants (playing themselves in reenactments), with a climax that is pure vérité. "The postmodern masterpiece of the 90s." – David Fear, Time Out New York. F. W. Murnau's SUNRISE April 2 – 8 One week! New 35mm Print! (1927) The idyllic marriage of George O'Brien and Janet Gaynor is threatened when he falls for a cigarette-smoking, jazz-loving vamp from the city - so hard that he starts contemplating murdering his wife. "Possibly the greatest achievement of both Murnau and the silent film." – Pauline Kael. THE NEWSPAPER PICTURE April 9 – May 6 Four weeks! All 35mm Prints! 4-week, 43-film series spotlighting newshounds, gossip columnists, sensation-seeking editors, and sob sisters. Films include Billy Wilder's Ace in the Hole, with Kirk Douglas; Mervyn LeRoy's Five Star Final, with Edward G. Robinson; Michael Curtiz's Front Page Woman, with Bette Davis; Deadline U.S.A., with Humphrey Bogart; Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor, Alexander Mackendrick's Sweet Smell of Success, with Burt Lancaster and Tony Curtis; Frank Capra's Meet John Doe, with Gary Cooper and Barbara Stanwyck; Howard Hawks' His Girl Friday, with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell, based on Hecht & MacArthur's The Front Page; and Lewis Milestone's extremely rare original 1931 version, starring Adolphe Menjou and Pat O'Brien. Special guests during the festival will include Brooke Gladstone (co-host of NPR'S On the Media), Randy Cohen ("The Ethicist" of The New York Times), V.A. Musetto (New York Post), and writer James Lardner, son of screenwriter Ring Lardner Jr. and grandson of humorist Ring Lardner. See attached pdf for complete schedule. LEE TRACY Tuesdays, April 13 – May 4 (Plus Monday, April 19) Tuesday nights during The Newspaper Picture festival are devoted to Lee Tracy (1898-1968), who set the gold standard for the fast-talking newspaperman of the 1930s (he was Hildy Johnson in the original stage production of The Front Page), in such films as Blessed Event, The Strange Love of Molly Louvain and Love is a Racket. SPECIAL EVENT Josef von Sternberg's THE DOCKS OF NEW YORK & Selected Shorts in the National Film Registry Monday, March 22 Dock worker George Bancroft marries - or does he? - waterfront hooker Betty Compson after rescuing her from suicide, in von Sternberg's first expressionist masterpiece, inducted into the National Film Registry in 1999. Daniel Eagan, author of America's Film Legacy: the Authoritative Guide to the Landmark Movies in the National Film Registry, will introduce the program, which will also include selected silent and sound shorts from the Registry. Live piano accompaniment by Steve Sterner. SPECIAL EVENT BILL FORSYTH Thursdays, April 15 & 22 Three films by award-winning Scottish writer-director Bill Forsyth: Gregory's Girl (1981), Local Hero (1983), and the underrated Housekeeping (1987). Mr. Forsyth will be interviewed onstage by Jim Healy, assistant film curator of George Eastman House, following the screening of Housekeeping on April 15.

Feb. 2010 Valentine's Day Cruise for Jeannette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy Fans - Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy Valentines Week Bahamas cruise, sailing from Baltimore, February 7-14, 2010


Join us for the second annual cruise celebrating "America's Singing Sweethearts" - Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. Featured events include screenings of some their greatest movie hits which include "Naughty Marietta" (1935), "Rose Marie" (1936), "Maytime (1937), "Sweethearts" (1938) and "New Moon" (1940) with a special sing-along screening for one film. Guest lecturer is Sharon Rich, author of the best selling book "Sweethearts: The Timeless Love Affair On-Screen and Off Between Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy." Other guest speakers are being scheduled that knew or worked with MacDonald or Eddy. Washington, D.C. impresario Darryl Winston will host a talent night for all singers. It's a week filled with nostalgia, fabulous music, fabulous films, classic movie history and the inside skinny about one of Hollywood's greatest off-screen romances! If you are a fan or a singer who performs the MacDonald-Eddy and operatic repertoire and want to be showcased on our talent night ...then join us! We are calling you--oo--oo!

"The very first bookings for this cruise came from two girls, one 20 and the other 22, " says Sharon Rich. "They are as enthusiastic as any fans I have ever met. The MacDonald-Eddy films, like opera, are timeless, romantic stories with great music. Thanks to Turner Classic Movies, their movies are aired often and new generations are discovering them."

Rich adds: "The question of whether MacDonald and Eddy were off-screen lovers was answered very definitively by MacDonald's older sister, actress Blossom Rock." Rock was best known for portraying Grandmama in the TV series "The Addams Family." "I was a teenager when I met Blossom about five years after Jeanette's death, and was friends with her for several years. When I became a writer, Blossom asked me to do a candid book about her sister. She was angry that Jeanette and Nelson were slighted or mocked in Hollywood history. After all, they put MGM musicals on the map and in their heyday, their films were the top-grossing movies worldwide. But by 1950 they had vanished from the Hollywood scene. This was no small part due to the secrecy and stress of their private lives, which caused both of them to suffer breakdowns. Blossom gave me a list of contacts to call, who agreed to speak to me because of her endorsement."

Rich subsequently annotated and published Jeanette MacDonald's typewritten manuscript of an unfinished autobiography, along with a book of handwritten love letters MacDonald wrote to an early beau, Irving Stone. Both volumes present MacDonald uncensored. "Although Jeanette was cagey in her autobiography, she unintentionally revealed a great deal," Rich says. "She admits to dating Nelson Eddy and considering him along with Gene Raymond, the Nelson Eddy lookalike actor she finally did marry. Then she abruptly stops mentioning Nelson at all in a personal way and goes on about how she pre-screened Gene Raymond to make sure he would not stand in the way of her career – a sore point with Nelson Eddy. After their lavish, much-photographed Hollywood wedding, Jeanette writes that she returned from her honeymoon having known very little about the personal turmoil of the man she married. She lets slip that they slept in separate beds, and though they remained married until her death in 1965, she writes of several separations and discussion of divorce.

"No matter where I've lectured, from London to Toronto to Los Angeles or AFI East Coast, people always ask about the celebrity gossip," says Sharon Rich. "The most commonly asked question is: If MacDonald and Eddy were so much in love, why didn't they marry each other?" That is a question that will be discussed thoroughly in the Q&A session on the cruise.

Guests will also have an opportunity to tell their stories and be interviewed on film for an upcoming MacDonald and Eddy documentary. "The research has been ongoing and I know there are people still out there with information to add," says Rich. "But now it's time to wrap up the documentary. If anyone reading this knows of someone I should interview, either privately or on film, please contact me at sharonrich@aol.com. Or call me at 646-321-8504. The time to come forward is now."

Excerpts from earlier filmed interviews will be part of the cruise film program. For more information, pricing and to book the cruise, visit the Official web site. Since this is a private event, only those passengers booked through that website will be admitted to the Jeanette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy events.

In honor of the cruise, TCM viewers can take 10% off the book "Sweethearts" and other MacDonald/Eddy books by Sharon Rich at THIS LOCATION . Use coupon code: TCM at checkout.

Feb. 2010 Valentine's Day Cruise for Jeannette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy Fans - Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy Valentines Week Bahamas cruise, sailing from Baltimore, February 7-14, 2010

Join us for the second annual cruise celebrating "America's Singing Sweethearts" - Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy. Featured events include screenings of some their greatest movie hits which include "Naughty Marietta" (1935), "Rose Marie" (1936), "Maytime (1937), "Sweethearts" (1938) and "New Moon" (1940) with a special sing-along screening for one film. Guest lecturer is Sharon Rich, author of the best selling book "Sweethearts: The Timeless Love Affair On-Screen and Off Between Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy." Other guest speakers are being scheduled that knew or worked with MacDonald or Eddy. Washington, D.C. impresario Darryl Winston will host a talent night for all singers. It's a week filled with nostalgia, fabulous music, fabulous films, classic movie history and the inside skinny about one of Hollywood's greatest off-screen romances! If you are a fan or a singer who performs the MacDonald-Eddy and operatic repertoire and want to be showcased on our talent night ...then join us! We are calling you--oo--oo! "The very first bookings for this cruise came from two girls, one 20 and the other 22, " says Sharon Rich. "They are as enthusiastic as any fans I have ever met. The MacDonald-Eddy films, like opera, are timeless, romantic stories with great music. Thanks to Turner Classic Movies, their movies are aired often and new generations are discovering them." Rich adds: "The question of whether MacDonald and Eddy were off-screen lovers was answered very definitively by MacDonald's older sister, actress Blossom Rock." Rock was best known for portraying Grandmama in the TV series "The Addams Family." "I was a teenager when I met Blossom about five years after Jeanette's death, and was friends with her for several years. When I became a writer, Blossom asked me to do a candid book about her sister. She was angry that Jeanette and Nelson were slighted or mocked in Hollywood history. After all, they put MGM musicals on the map and in their heyday, their films were the top-grossing movies worldwide. But by 1950 they had vanished from the Hollywood scene. This was no small part due to the secrecy and stress of their private lives, which caused both of them to suffer breakdowns. Blossom gave me a list of contacts to call, who agreed to speak to me because of her endorsement." Rich subsequently annotated and published Jeanette MacDonald's typewritten manuscript of an unfinished autobiography, along with a book of handwritten love letters MacDonald wrote to an early beau, Irving Stone. Both volumes present MacDonald uncensored. "Although Jeanette was cagey in her autobiography, she unintentionally revealed a great deal," Rich says. "She admits to dating Nelson Eddy and considering him along with Gene Raymond, the Nelson Eddy lookalike actor she finally did marry. Then she abruptly stops mentioning Nelson at all in a personal way and goes on about how she pre-screened Gene Raymond to make sure he would not stand in the way of her career – a sore point with Nelson Eddy. After their lavish, much-photographed Hollywood wedding, Jeanette writes that she returned from her honeymoon having known very little about the personal turmoil of the man she married. She lets slip that they slept in separate beds, and though they remained married until her death in 1965, she writes of several separations and discussion of divorce. "No matter where I've lectured, from London to Toronto to Los Angeles or AFI East Coast, people always ask about the celebrity gossip," says Sharon Rich. "The most commonly asked question is: If MacDonald and Eddy were so much in love, why didn't they marry each other?" That is a question that will be discussed thoroughly in the Q&A session on the cruise. Guests will also have an opportunity to tell their stories and be interviewed on film for an upcoming MacDonald and Eddy documentary. "The research has been ongoing and I know there are people still out there with information to add," says Rich. "But now it's time to wrap up the documentary. If anyone reading this knows of someone I should interview, either privately or on film, please contact me at sharonrich@aol.com. Or call me at 646-321-8504. The time to come forward is now." Excerpts from earlier filmed interviews will be part of the cruise film program. For more information, pricing and to book the cruise, visit the Official web site. Since this is a private event, only those passengers booked through that website will be admitted to the Jeanette MacDonald & Nelson Eddy events. In honor of the cruise, TCM viewers can take 10% off the book "Sweethearts" and other MacDonald/Eddy books by Sharon Rich at THIS LOCATION . Use coupon code: TCM at checkout.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States December 1984

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1984

Sequel to "2001: A space Odyssey" (1968) directed by Stanley Kubrick.

Released in USA on video.

Began shooting February 7, 1984.

Completed shooting November 1984.

Released in United States December 1984

Released in United States Winter December 1, 1984