True to the Army


1h 16m 1942

Film Details

Also Known As
Private Yoo Hoo, Sergeant Yoo-Hoo
Release Date
Jan 1942
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 14 Jun 1942
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Biltmore Theater, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel She Loves Me Not by Edward Hope (Indianapolis, 1933) and the play of the same name by Howard Lindsay (New York, 20 Nov 1933).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Film Length
6,877ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Private Bill Chandler, also known as "Broadway Bill," has abandoned New York theater to enlist in the Army, where he now produces morale-boosting plays at Fort Bray. At a nearby circus, tightrope walker Daisy Hawkins witnesses the murder of the circus owner by the Drake gang. Although Drake is arrested, his gang plans to kill Daisy so that she cannot testify against him. Daisy escapes to hide with her boyfriend, Private J. Wethersby "Pinky" Fothergill, the official pigeoneer stationed at Fort Bray. Still in costume, Daisy first stumbles into one of Bill's auditions, for which the soldiers are dressed as women, and he assumes that she is yet another masquerading soldier. Because she seems to be the only talented singer, Bill agrees to help hide Daisy. Bill and Pinky cut her hair, give her a soldier's uniform and call her "Private Omstock," and Daisy soon becomes the hit of her unit because she is a sharpshooter. Bill, in the meantime, meets the commanding officer's beautiful daughter, Vicki Marlow, and discovers that she is a talented singer and tapdancer. However, Colonel Marlow refuses to allow her in the show. When Drake's thugs send a man posing as a police detective to the fort, Marlow arranges an all-out search for Daisy. Daisy successfully continues her ruse until one night, when her well-meaning unit soldiers take her to a local nightclub, she gets drunk and starts to apply makeup. When Drake's thugs try to take her away, the soldiers pick a fight with them, during which Daisy escapes. By the time of the show, Bill and Vicki have fallen in love while secretly rehearsing Vicki's numbers. Marlow is initially dismayed to see his daughter onstage until he receives the approbation of his commanding officers. Bill has arranged for the police to infiltrate the theater, hoping that Daisy's appearance onstage will lure the gangsters out in public. During Pinky's magic act, the thugs shoot at Daisy using silencers, but their aim is off. However, Daisy's aim never falters during her sharpshooting act, and in the next dance she shoots the guns out of the gangsters' hands. The gangsters are arrested, and Bill proposes to Vicki during the finale.

Film Details

Also Known As
Private Yoo Hoo, Sergeant Yoo-Hoo
Release Date
Jan 1942
Premiere Information
New York opening: week of 14 Jun 1942
Production Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Distribution Company
Paramount Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Los Angeles--Biltmore Theater, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel She Loves Me Not by Edward Hope (Indianapolis, 1933) and the play of the same name by Howard Lindsay (New York, 20 Nov 1933).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 16m
Film Length
6,877ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working titles of this film were Sergeant Yoo-Hoo and Private Yoo Hoo. A Hollywood Reporter news item indicates that writer Arthur Lewis worked on the screenplay; however, the extent of his contribution to the final film has not been determined. The performance scene was shot at the Biltmore Theater in Los Angeles, CA. Paramount's 1934 film She Loves Me Not was based on the same sources, and was directed by Elliott Nugent and starred Bing Crosby and Miriam Hopkins (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40; F3.4008).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1942

Released in United States 1942