To Sleep with Anger


1h 41m 1990
To Sleep with Anger

Brief Synopsis

Witnessing how the generational disputes between the family patriarch, his wife and their two married sons become amplified when an unexpected visitor drops in... Enter Harry, a smiling charmer from the old days in the Deep South... Is he in fact an evil spirit, setting a curse upon the house?.. Har

Film Details

Also Known As
La Rage au coeur, Rage au coeur, La
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Alter Image Inc; CFI Hollywood; Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; Cinema Research Corporation; Film Finances, Inc.; Fotokem Film & Video; Great Northern/ Reiff & Associates (Ny); Pangea Media Group; Pressman Film
Distribution Company
CINEPHILE/SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS; Samuel Goldwyn Films; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; StudioCanal; Studiocanal
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Synopsis

Witnessing how the generational disputes between the family patriarch, his wife and their two married sons become amplified when an unexpected visitor drops in... Enter Harry, a smiling charmer from the old days in the Deep South... Is he in fact an evil spirit, setting a curse upon the house?.. Harry, a bonafied trixter, both frightening and a little pathetic, serves as a catalyst to explore the conflicting systems of belief--Christian, magical, materialistic--endured by an already fragmented middle-class black family.

Crew

Larry Addison

Song ("Annie Mae'S Cafe")

Bobbi Almoite

Wardrobe Assistant

Mia Ambrester

Set Dresser

Thomisene Anderson

Song ("Walking', Talkin' And Singin' The Blues")

Ethel Ayer

Song Performer ("Stand By Me")

Hubert Bals

Assistance

Penny Barrett

Production Designer

Brandon Bates

Production Assistant

James Beaton

Production Coordinator

Bobby Bland

Song Performer ("Walkin', Talkin' And Singin' The Blues" "I Hear You Thinking")

Harold Borzynski

Driver

David Bradstreet

Assistant (To Caldecot Chubb)

Caitlin Buchman

Assistance

Charles Burnett

Screenwriter

Steven Shannon Burnett

Assistance

Steven Burns

Other

Thomas S Byrnes

Producer

Veda Campbell

Sound Mixer

Valerie Cano

Set Dresser Assistant

Glenn Capers

Stills

Budd Carr

Music Supervisor

Elizabeth Carr

Production Assistant

Joel Leroy Carter

Property Master

Sid Carter

Other

Carol Castillo

Other

Jeff Charbonneau

Music Editor

Cotty Chubb

Producer

Dave Clark

Song ("Walkin', Talkin' And Singin' The Blues")

Kathleen Collins

Assistance

Larry Corbett

Other

Gregory Daniels

2nd Assistant Camera

Willie Dawkins

Electrician

Rene L Dawson

Craft Service

Skye Dent

Unit Publicist

Maura Depalma

Assistant (To Thomas S Byrnes And Harris E Tulchin)

Ira Deutchman

Marketing Consultant

Christine Devereux

Assistant (To Thomas S Byrnes And Harris E Tulchin)

Phillippa Devilliers

Assistant (To Charles Burnett)

Gail Duncan

Production Assistant

T C Eachus

Dolly Grip

Alvechia Ewing

Makeup Assistant

Terri Fiyalko

Dialogue Editor

Matthew Flott

Other

Michael Flynn

Associate Producer

Donna Fobbs

Wardrobe Assistant

William Freesh

Sound 2nd Assistant

Haile Gerima

Assistance

Alan Gershenfeld

Production Coordinator Supervisor

Diane Girskis

Wardrobe Assistant

Danny Glover

Executive Producer

Lewis Goldstein

Sound Effects Designer

Jimmy Griffin

Song

Patrick M Griffith

Post-Production Sound Supervisor

Todd Grove

Production Auditor

Diane Hammond

Makeup

Kevin Hanson

Grip

Kimberly Hardin

Casting Assistant

Tom Harjo

Key Grip

Christina Harley

Wardrobe Assistant

Melanie Harris

Assistant (To Danny Glover)

Rody Hassano

Foley Recording

Z Z Hill

Song Performer ("Down Home Blues" "Open House At My House")

Michael Holzman

Production Executive (Svs)

Nathan Hopper

Production Assistant

Danny Irby

Hairstyles Assistant

George Jackson

Songs ("Annie Mae'S Cafe" "Down Home Blues" "I Hear You Thinking")

Sati Jamal

2nd Assistant Director

Kristen Janusis

Sound 2nd Assistant

Catherine Jelski

Script Supervisor

George Johnson

Digital Interface

Bill Johnston

Sound Technical Services

Pat Johnston

Sound Facility Coordinator

Kasey Jones

Location Consultant

Nelson Jones

Transportation Captain

Mike Joyner

Grip

Barbara Kallir

Bestboy Electrician

Teri Kane

Publicist

Erma Kent

Hairstyles Assistant

Paul Key

Sound Technical Services

Michelle King

Hairstyles Assistant

Linda Koulisis

Associate Producer

Kris Krengel

2nd Assistant Director

Jim Lacefield

Bassist

John Ladd

Assistant (To Edward R Pressman)

Carol Munday Lawrence

Post-Production Supervisor

Myra Lebo

Assistant (To Edward R Pressman)

Gerry Lentz

Post-Production Sound Engineer Supervisor

Gail Levin

Casting

Arthur Liggins

Song ("I Hear You Thinking")

Dane Little

Other

Lauren Lloyd

Casting

Walt Lloyd

Director Of Photography

Rob Luna

Adr Recording

Terry Mack

Transportation Coordinator

Terry Mack

Special Effects

John H Maninger

Electrician

Lisa Mashburn

Post-Production Auditor

Stacey Matthew

2nd Assistant Director

Joe Mayer

Dialogue Editor

Tanya Mcginness

Sound 2nd Assistant

Jonathan Meizler

1st Assistant Director

Christi Moore

Assistant Editor

Rita Moshier

Set Dresser

Lary Moten

Assistant Editor

Julia Moye

Sound 2nd Assistant

Troy Myers

Art Direction

Peter Nunnery

Production Assistant

Jon Oh

Sound Effects (Temporary)

Willie Ornelas

Drummer

Ethan Paritzky

Other

Dino Parks

Gaffer

Bobby Patteron

Song ("Open House At My House")

Robert C Perry

Boom Operator

Ken S Polk

Sound Recording Mixer

Edward Pressman

Executive Producer

George Rahm

Sound Technical Services

Nancy Richardson

Editor

Jeffrey Ringler

Production Executive (Svs)

Paul Rodriguez

Sound Facility Coordinator

Catherine Rowe

Foley Artist

Joan Rowe

Foley Artist

Lui Sanchez

Other

Darin Scott

Producer

Joy Shannon

Wardrobe Supervisor

Gaye Shannon-burnett

Costume Designer

John W. Simmons

Additional Photography

Ginger Slaughter

Publicist

Roger Still

Honeywagon Driver

Susan Streitfeld

Assistance

Susan Stremple

Production Manager

Jerry Strickland

Song ("Open House At My House")

Mark H Sudmeier

Electrician

Tommy Tate

Song ("Walkin', Talkin' And Singin' The Blues")

Stephen James Taylor

Guitarist; Harmonica Player; Music

Ken Teaney

Sound Recording Mixer

Sister Rosetta Tharpe

Song Performer ("Precious Memories")

Joseph Thompson

Bestboy Grip

Ron Thompson

Other

Michael Tolkin

Assistance

Ildiko Toth

Set Dresser Assistant

Plummy Tucker

Assistant Editor

Harris Tulchin

Executive Producer

Enzo Ungari

Assistance

Phil Upchurch

Assistance

Ken Walker

Hairstyles

Masonya Washington

Production Assistant

Josh Weisman

Craft Service

Neal Weisman

Other

Derek Wells

Grip

Earl West

Location Manager

Dana White

Production Assistant

Marie E Willson

Other

Hershel Wise

Other

Jimmy Witherspoon

Song Performer ("See See Rider")

Tom Yatsko

1st Assistant Camera

Carol Ann Young

Other

Ann Zald

Props Assistant

Debbie Zoler

Makeup Assistant (Extras)

Film Details

Also Known As
La Rage au coeur, Rage au coeur, La
MPAA Rating
Release Date
1990
Production Company
Alter Image Inc; CFI Hollywood; Chapman/Leonard Studio Equipment, Inc.; Cinema Research Corporation; Film Finances, Inc.; Fotokem Film & Video; Great Northern/ Reiff & Associates (Ny); Pangea Media Group; Pressman Film
Distribution Company
CINEPHILE/SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS; Samuel Goldwyn Films; Sony Pictures Home Entertainment; StudioCanal; Studiocanal
Location
Los Angeles, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 41m

Articles

Charles Burnett Reflects on To Sleep with Anger


TCM’s broadcast of Charles Burnett’s To Sleep with Anger (1990) is a rare chance to discover—or rediscover—an underseen masterwork (it only opened in 17 theaters nationwide) that The Atlantic in 2019 hailed as “one of the best movies of the 1990s.” The Arts Fuse called it “chronically underappreciated” and its director “one of cinema’s great underdogs.”

Released in 1990, To Sleep with Anger was Burnett’s most ambitious film yet after writing and directing two independent films, Killer of Sheep (1978) and My Brother’s Wedding (1983). Both utilized casts of non-professionals and were rapturously received by critics. That did not translate into big box office, but in 1990, Killer of Sheep was one of the inaugural 50 films inducted into the National Film Registry of films deemed to be “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”

To Sleep with Anger joined it in 2017. The rich and resonate folkloric tale stars Paul Butler and Mary Alice as Gideon and his wife, Suzie, southern transplants in middle-class Los Angeles neighborhood South Central. Arriving unannounced on their doorstep is Harry (Danny Glover), an old friend from the South who insinuates himself into their lives and in the business of their two married sons, the dependable Junior (Carl Lumbly) and the rudderless Babe Brother (Richard Brooks). “You’re not like the rest of Gideon’s friends,” Babe’s increasingly estranged wife Linda (Sheryl Lee Ralph) observes. She has no idea.

To Sleep with Anger has lost none of its power to unsettle viewers as Harry’s worldview (“I don’t believe in sin, though there is good and evil”) undermines Gideon and Suzie’s family. Or is he just “clearing the waters?”

Burnett, 76, was perhaps the best-known director of the L.A. Rebellion, a group of UCLA film students that included Julie Dash, Billy Woodberry and Haile Gerima, and who shared with their New Hollywood counterparts’ a desire to remake he traditional studio system in their images. But instead of taking inspiration from the classic Hollywood directors, they were inspired by the more radical visions of world cinema.

Burnett spoke with TCM about defining Black film, the importance of being Danny Glover and why Burnett was willing to travel from South Africa to America to accept the Horton Foote Prize for writing.


One of the tenets of the L.A. Rebellion was to put onscreen images of Black life that Hollywood ignored. How does that relate to the setting of South Central in To Sleep with Anger?

Charles Burnett: We were all trying to define what a Black film is. What was the narrative we were supposed to be telling from our perspective, something that truly represents our neighbors and the people we grew up with and their concerns? So we tried to find something that relates to them other than something manufactured by people who have no idea what Black life is like. We were looking for stories that spoke to people of color told by people of color, things they hadn’t seen onscreen before that represents a common culture.

The L.A. Rebellion directors were at UCLA. Was there ever a meeting with aspiring directors at USC to share your visions?

CB: No, although I met John Singleton years later. I was trying to get into USC because it was closer to where I live, but it was too expensive. You had to enroll before you could apply for a loan. I needed to get a loan so I could get enrolled. UCLA said, ‘Come on over,’ and I’m glad I did. They gave you all the film you wanted and left you alone so you could make whatever film you wanted.

Was breaking in to Hollywood the dream?

CB: No, we didn’t have any cousins or relatives in the business. We knew it was a difficult path. We wanted to make films that spoke to the community. That was our first audience.

How did you become interested in directing?

CB: I wasn’t interested in making movies growing up. Strangely, though, I wanted to shoot a camera. A friend of mine had a Super 8 camera. I used to work at this car wash in Inglewood. He brought his camera and I shot this airplane flying overhead. That was the first time. What I did have an inkling for was photo journalism. I got out of that quickly. What happened was, I bought this old 35mm camera, and there was this poor lady who overdosed and I was just taking pictures of this woman who died in a doorway. This young girl who lived in the neighborhood—I think she was a related to the lady that died—she came to where I was and asked why I was taking pictures. I said something stupid, like, ‘Oh, it’s only for fun.’ She didn’t get angry. She just said, ‘Even in tragedies?’ It was like a knife in the heart. And that was the end of that.

But did you like going to the movies? What was your movie theater growing up?

CB: I went to see a lot of really good movies, just as a fan, at The Los Angeles, The Manchester, The Mayfair, The Century Drive-In, The Twin-Vue Drive-In. On television, they had the Million Dollar Movie. We saw all sorts of really good, quality films: a lot of Hitchcock, Shane, High Noon, Dracula, Frankenstein, King Kong.

Dracula. I wanted to ask you about that because when we first glimpse Harry, he is standing with his back to the viewer on Gideon’s doorstep. Later in the film, he says to Suzie, “You invited me in.” That reminded me of movie vampire lore that a vampire cannot enter a home unless they are invited.

CB: It’s a Southern folklore thing; people had evil spirits connected to them. My mother wouldn’t let people in the house because of bad karma. I didn’t believe it as a kid, but as you grow older, you think, ‘Maybe there’s something to it.’ So I put it in the film.

This was your first film in which you worked with professional actors. How did Danny Glover become involved?

I wrote Harry with another actor in mind. Danny said he wanted to read for Harry and I said, ‘Be my guest.’ (laughs). That opened up everything. All of a sudden it became a movie. (Glover also served as a producer.)

What was it like working with professional actors for the first time?

They were all great and gracious to me. One of the good things about working with professional actors is they know they’re job. If you want to make adjustments, they can change gears; you don’t have to spend a lot of time explaining something. In my previous films, I typecast actors so they were playing themselves in many ways.

Some [non-actors] would just come to the set when they wanted to. They were doing me a favor, so I had to leverage it. This one actor, he was sick and we had already shot stuff on him. He couldn’t make it and asked whether another person could take his place. I tried to explain it to him that it wasn’t like a baseball game where you can change pitchers in the middle. It was a foreign business to them. One thing I wanted to do with my earlier films was to demystify filmmaking to get kids in the community involved.

The ensemble in To Sleep with Anger is so rich; several of the characters could support their own films.

CB: You see the potential in what they can bring to a role; it makes you want to write for them. There are so many wonderful actors who don’t get a chance. They would come in for a reading and I was just blown away. I would ask a dumb question, like, ‘Why don’t we see more of you?’ These artists have so much to give; they can make a difference in how we see one another.

This was your second film to be inducted into the National Film Registry. Considering how the film was mis-handled and kept from being seen by a wider audience, this must have been especially gratifying.

CB: It was poetic justice in a way. When I was trying to get the film made with PBS, I had problems in trying to get them to understand what the film was about. They were twisting my arm. They pay you when you develop something and they pay you when you turn it in. And then they comment on it, and you make changes based on the comments. The check is always upstairs, which means they’re not going to pay you until you make these changes. They were nasty. Horton Foote had a film on PBS and it was similar in that characters were talking about old times in the South. They got on my case about that. They said, ‘You’re no Horton Foote.’ I asked for the film back.

In 2007, I was in South Africa finishing a film. I got this call from the states asking if I could attend an awards ceremony. I asked if someone could pick it up for me, and they said no. I was very frustrated because that’s a long trip. I asked what the award was and they said, ‘It’s the Horton Foote Prize’ for writing. I said, ‘I’ll be right there.’ (laughs)

To Sleep with Anger earned Independent Spirit Awards for Danny Glover as well as your direction and screenplay, and despite its theatrical misfortunes, it endures. It received the Criterion treatment a few years ago and it’s being featured on TCM.

CB: This business is all about rejection. You never know where you stand or whether a movie really works. I came up with the Civil Rights Movement. I never made films to be just entertainment. It was to have social impact. Film can be a tool of social change. I felt that was our responsibility.

Charles Burnett Reflects On To Sleep With Anger

Charles Burnett Reflects on To Sleep with Anger

TCM’s broadcast of Charles Burnett’s To Sleep with Anger (1990) is a rare chance to discover—or rediscover—an underseen masterwork (it only opened in 17 theaters nationwide) that The Atlantic in 2019 hailed as “one of the best movies of the 1990s.” The Arts Fuse called it “chronically underappreciated” and its director “one of cinema’s great underdogs.”Released in 1990, To Sleep with Anger was Burnett’s most ambitious film yet after writing and directing two independent films, Killer of Sheep (1978) and My Brother’s Wedding (1983). Both utilized casts of non-professionals and were rapturously received by critics. That did not translate into big box office, but in 1990, Killer of Sheep was one of the inaugural 50 films inducted into the National Film Registry of films deemed to be “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant.”To Sleep with Anger joined it in 2017. The rich and resonate folkloric tale stars Paul Butler and Mary Alice as Gideon and his wife, Suzie, southern transplants in middle-class Los Angeles neighborhood South Central. Arriving unannounced on their doorstep is Harry (Danny Glover), an old friend from the South who insinuates himself into their lives and in the business of their two married sons, the dependable Junior (Carl Lumbly) and the rudderless Babe Brother (Richard Brooks). “You’re not like the rest of Gideon’s friends,” Babe’s increasingly estranged wife Linda (Sheryl Lee Ralph) observes. She has no idea.To Sleep with Anger has lost none of its power to unsettle viewers as Harry’s worldview (“I don’t believe in sin, though there is good and evil”) undermines Gideon and Suzie’s family. Or is he just “clearing the waters?”Burnett, 76, was perhaps the best-known director of the L.A. Rebellion, a group of UCLA film students that included Julie Dash, Billy Woodberry and Haile Gerima, and who shared with their New Hollywood counterparts’ a desire to remake he traditional studio system in their images. But instead of taking inspiration from the classic Hollywood directors, they were inspired by the more radical visions of world cinema.Burnett spoke with TCM about defining Black film, the importance of being Danny Glover and why Burnett was willing to travel from South Africa to America to accept the Horton Foote Prize for writing.One of the tenets of the L.A. Rebellion was to put onscreen images of Black life that Hollywood ignored. How does that relate to the setting of South Central in To Sleep with Anger?Charles Burnett: We were all trying to define what a Black film is. What was the narrative we were supposed to be telling from our perspective, something that truly represents our neighbors and the people we grew up with and their concerns? So we tried to find something that relates to them other than something manufactured by people who have no idea what Black life is like. We were looking for stories that spoke to people of color told by people of color, things they hadn’t seen onscreen before that represents a common culture.The L.A. Rebellion directors were at UCLA. Was there ever a meeting with aspiring directors at USC to share your visions?CB: No, although I met John Singleton years later. I was trying to get into USC because it was closer to where I live, but it was too expensive. You had to enroll before you could apply for a loan. I needed to get a loan so I could get enrolled. UCLA said, ‘Come on over,’ and I’m glad I did. They gave you all the film you wanted and left you alone so you could make whatever film you wanted.Was breaking in to Hollywood the dream?CB: No, we didn’t have any cousins or relatives in the business. We knew it was a difficult path. We wanted to make films that spoke to the community. That was our first audience.How did you become interested in directing?CB: I wasn’t interested in making movies growing up. Strangely, though, I wanted to shoot a camera. A friend of mine had a Super 8 camera. I used to work at this car wash in Inglewood. He brought his camera and I shot this airplane flying overhead. That was the first time. What I did have an inkling for was photo journalism. I got out of that quickly. What happened was, I bought this old 35mm camera, and there was this poor lady who overdosed and I was just taking pictures of this woman who died in a doorway. This young girl who lived in the neighborhood—I think she was a related to the lady that died—she came to where I was and asked why I was taking pictures. I said something stupid, like, ‘Oh, it’s only for fun.’ She didn’t get angry. She just said, ‘Even in tragedies?’ It was like a knife in the heart. And that was the end of that.But did you like going to the movies? What was your movie theater growing up?CB: I went to see a lot of really good movies, just as a fan, at The Los Angeles, The Manchester, The Mayfair, The Century Drive-In, The Twin-Vue Drive-In. On television, they had the Million Dollar Movie. We saw all sorts of really good, quality films: a lot of Hitchcock, Shane, High Noon, Dracula, Frankenstein, King Kong.Dracula. I wanted to ask you about that because when we first glimpse Harry, he is standing with his back to the viewer on Gideon’s doorstep. Later in the film, he says to Suzie, “You invited me in.” That reminded me of movie vampire lore that a vampire cannot enter a home unless they are invited. CB: It’s a Southern folklore thing; people had evil spirits connected to them. My mother wouldn’t let people in the house because of bad karma. I didn’t believe it as a kid, but as you grow older, you think, ‘Maybe there’s something to it.’ So I put it in the film.This was your first film in which you worked with professional actors. How did Danny Glover become involved?I wrote Harry with another actor in mind. Danny said he wanted to read for Harry and I said, ‘Be my guest.’ (laughs). That opened up everything. All of a sudden it became a movie. (Glover also served as a producer.)What was it like working with professional actors for the first time?They were all great and gracious to me. One of the good things about working with professional actors is they know they’re job. If you want to make adjustments, they can change gears; you don’t have to spend a lot of time explaining something. In my previous films, I typecast actors so they were playing themselves in many ways.Some [non-actors] would just come to the set when they wanted to. They were doing me a favor, so I had to leverage it. This one actor, he was sick and we had already shot stuff on him. He couldn’t make it and asked whether another person could take his place. I tried to explain it to him that it wasn’t like a baseball game where you can change pitchers in the middle. It was a foreign business to them. One thing I wanted to do with my earlier films was to demystify filmmaking to get kids in the community involved.The ensemble in To Sleep with Anger is so rich; several of the characters could support their own films. CB: You see the potential in what they can bring to a role; it makes you want to write for them. There are so many wonderful actors who don’t get a chance. They would come in for a reading and I was just blown away. I would ask a dumb question, like, ‘Why don’t we see more of you?’ These artists have so much to give; they can make a difference in how we see one another.This was your second film to be inducted into the National Film Registry. Considering how the film was mis-handled and kept from being seen by a wider audience, this must have been especially gratifying.CB: It was poetic justice in a way. When I was trying to get the film made with PBS, I had problems in trying to get them to understand what the film was about. They were twisting my arm. They pay you when you develop something and they pay you when you turn it in. And then they comment on it, and you make changes based on the comments. The check is always upstairs, which means they’re not going to pay you until you make these changes. They were nasty. Horton Foote had a film on PBS and it was similar in that characters were talking about old times in the South. They got on my case about that. They said, ‘You’re no Horton Foote.’ I asked for the film back.In 2007, I was in South Africa finishing a film. I got this call from the states asking if I could attend an awards ceremony. I asked if someone could pick it up for me, and they said no. I was very frustrated because that’s a long trip. I asked what the award was and they said, ‘It’s the Horton Foote Prize’ for writing. I said, ‘I’ll be right there.’ (laughs)To Sleep with Anger earned Independent Spirit Awards for Danny Glover as well as your direction and screenplay, and despite its theatrical misfortunes, it endures. It received the Criterion treatment a few years ago and it’s being featured on TCM. CB: This business is all about rejection. You never know where you stand or whether a movie really works. I came up with the Civil Rights Movement. I never made films to be just entertainment. It was to have social impact. Film can be a tool of social change. I felt that was our responsibility.

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall October 12, 1990

Released in United States October 24, 1990

Wide Release in United States October 26, 1990

Released in United States on Video June 13, 1991

Released in United States 1990

Released in United States January 1990

Released in United States July 1990

Released in United States August 1990

Released in United States September 1990

Released in United States October 1990

Released in United States November 1990

Released in United States 1991

Released in United States June 1991

Released in United States 1994

Released in United States May 1995

Released in United States 1997

Released in United States July 2000

Shown at Hawaii International Film Festival November 25 - December 9, 1990.

Shown at Montreal World Film Festival (Cinema of Today and Tomorrow) August 23 - September 3, 1990.

Shown at Munich Film Festival June 23-July 1, 1990.

Shown at the United States Film Festival Park City, Utah January 20-28, 1990.

Shown at Goodwill Film Festival, Seattle July 20-29, 1990.

Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival August 11-26, 1990.

Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 6-15, 1990.

Shown at Mill Valley Film Festival October 4-11, 1990.

Shown at New York Film Festival October 5 & 6, 1990.

Shown at London Film Festival November 8-25, 1990.

Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica February 28 - March 8, 1991.

Shown at Pesaro International Festival of New Cinema June 11-19, 1991.

Shown at Brooklyn Museum in New York City as part of program "The L.A. Rebellion" January 15 - February 6, 1994.

Shown at Huntington International Film Festival (Charles Burnett Tribute) July 28-30, 2000.

Began shooting early June, 1989.

Completed shooting July 31, 1989.

Released in United States October 24, 1990 (Los Angeles)

Wide Release in United States October 26, 1990

Released in United States on Video June 13, 1991

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at Hawaii International Film Festival November 25 - December 9, 1990.)

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at Montreal World Film Festival (Cinema of Today and Tomorrow) August 23 - September 3, 1990.)

Released in United States 1990 (Shown at Munich Film Festival June 23-July 1, 1990.)

Released in United States January 1990 (Shown at the United States Film Festival Park City, Utah January 20-28, 1990.)

Released in United States July 1990 (Shown at Goodwill Film Festival, Seattle July 20-29, 1990.)

Released in United States August 1990 (Shown at Edinburgh International Film Festival August 11-26, 1990.)

Ultra-Stereo

Released in United States Fall October 12, 1990

Released in United States September 1990 (Shown at Toronto Festival of Festivals September 6-15, 1990.)

Released in United States October 1990 (Shown at Mill Valley Film Festival October 4-11, 1990.)

Released in United States October 1990 (Shown at New York Film Festival October 5 & 6, 1990.)

Released in United States November 1990 (Shown at London Film Festival November 8-25, 1990.)

Released in United States 1991 (Shown at American Film Market (AFM) in Santa Monica February 28 - March 8, 1991.)

Released in United States June 1991 (Shown at Pesaro International Festival of New Cinema June 11-19, 1991.)

Released in United States 1994 (Shown at Brooklyn Museum in New York City as part of program "The L.A. Rebellion" January 15 - February 6, 1994.)

Released in United States May 1995 (Shown in Los Angeles (UCLA) as part of program "Cinematic Images of the Black Male" May 15-23, 1995.)

Released in United States 1997 (Shown in New York City (Walter Reade Theater) as part of program "The Films of Charles Burnett: Witnessing for Everyday Heroes" January 31 - February 13, 1997.)

Released in United States July 2000 (Shown at Huntington International Film Festival (Charles Burnett Tribute) July 28-30, 2000.)