Nightmare Before Christmas


1h 15m 1993

Brief Synopsis

The king of Halloween Town sets out to take Santa Claus' place.

Film Details

Also Known As
The, Nightmare before Christmas 3D, Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas, étrange Noël de monsieur Jack
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Horror
Musical
Fantasy
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
San Francisco, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m

Synopsis

Despite having recently presided over a very successful Halloween, Jack Skellington, aka the Pumpkin King, is bored with his job and feels that life in Halloweenland lacks meaning. Then he stumbles upon Christmastown and promptly decides to make the Yuletide his own.

Crew

Allison Abbate

Art Department

Ila Abramson

Office Runner

Alia Agha

Production

Gretchen Maschmeyer Albrecht

Animator

Susan Alegria

Production Assistant

Richard L Anderson

Sound Editor

Robert Anderson

Stage Manager

Mary Andrews

Dialogue Editor

Jon Angle

Production Assistant

Tony Araki

Sound Dubbing

Derick P Arippol

Other

Mary-gail Artz

Casting

Kelly Asbury

Assistant Art Director

Loretta A Asbury

Other

Jim Aupperle

Camera Operator

Gene Autry

Song

Bob Badami

Music Editor

Gordon Baker

Animator

Tracy Barber

Post-Production Assistant

David Barker

Other

Steve Bartek

Song

Tandy Beal

Other

Christine Beck

Other

Frances P Behnam

Other

Michael Belzer

Animator

Jon Berg

Other

Jeannine Berger

Post-Production Coordinator

Lana Bernberg

Apprentice

Paul Berry

Animator

Michael Bienstock

Assistant

Andrea Biklian

Apprentice

Andrew Birch

Other

Kim Blanchette

Animator

Chris Boarman

Song

Bill Boes

Assistant Art Director

Nick Bogle

Visual Effects

Scott Bonnenfant

Animator

David A Bossert

Animator

Jeff Brewer

Other

Jeff Brewer

Visual Effects

Phil Brotherton

Other

Thomas Buchanan

Production Assistant

Stephen Buckley

Animator

David Burke

Office Runner

Tim Burton

From Story

Tim Burton

Producer

Tim Burton

Characters As Source Material

Miguel Domingo Cachuela

Animator

Miguel Domingo Cachuela

Storyboard Artist

Daniel Campbell

Production Assistant

Aisha Candrian

Other

Rick Canelli

Adr Voice Casting

Thomas Cardone

Color

Jo Carson

Camera Operator

Merrick Cheney

Other

Michael Chock

Sound Effects Editor

David Chong

Other

Carol Choy

Other

James Christopher

Sound Effects Editor

Blair Clark

Other

Sandy Clifford

Other

Jennifer Clinard

Scenic Artist

Barbara Cohen

Casting

Jerome Cook

Other

Kendal Cronkhite

Assistant Art Director

Philip Cusick

Other

David Cutler

Other

Shelley Daniels

Art Department

Drew Davidson

Other

Fon Davis

Other

Norm Decarlo

Art Department

Joe Dorn

Dialogue Editor

Richard Downing

Photography

Sara Duran-singer

Post-Production Supervisor

Randal M Dutra

Art Department

Ezra Dweck

Foley Mixer

Greg Dykstra

Art Department

Selwyn Eddy

Camera Operator

Danny Elfman

Music

Danny Elfman

Song

Danny Elfman

Associate Producer

Chrystene R Ells

Other

Shannon Fallis-kane

Other

Robert Fernandez

Music

Joel Fletcher

Animator

Shane Francis

Art Assistant

Joel Franklin

Other

B J Fredrickson

Scenic Artist

B J Fredrickson

Visual Effects

Joel Friesch

Visual Effects

Joel Friesch

On-Set Dresser

Kathleen Gavin

Coproducer

Christopher W Gee

Other

Ray Gilberti

Camera Operator

Angie Glocka

Animator

Kent Gordon

Other

Dale Grahn

Color Timer

Chris Green

Animator

Mike Grivett

Effects Assistant

Oakley Haldeman

Song

Margot Hale

Other

Barbara Hamane

Other

David Hanks

Camera Operator

Dina Hardy

Other

Troy Harris

Other

Bruce Hatakeyama

Other

Rick Heinrichs

Consultant

Don Henry

Other

Lee Henry

Construction

Gisela Hermeling

Assistant

Loren Hillman-morgan

Scenic Artist

Michael Hinton

Other

Timothy Hittle

Animator

Hilda Hodges

Foley

Rebecca House

3-D Models

Peggy Hrastar

Scenic Artist

Chyuan Huang

Other

Edie Ichioka

Associate Editor

Barry E Jackson

Character Designer

Bill Jackson

Song

Ron Jackson

Other

Jill Jacobs

Associate Producer

David Janssen

Production Assistant

Elizabeth Jennings

Other

Erik Jensen

Other

Paul Jessell

Animator

Joe Jiulano

Camera

Michael Jobe

Other

Mike Johnson

Animator

Lisa Keene

Other

Michael Kelly

Editing

Pamela Kibbee

3-D Models

Todd King

Other

Owen Klatte

Animator

Jorgen Klubein

Other

Jorgen Klubien

Storyboard Artist

Justin Kohn

Animator

Aaron Kohr

3-D Models

Mark Kohr

Assistant

Barbara Kossy

Other

Pete Kozachik

Visual Effects Supervisor

Pete Kozachik

Director Of Photography

Chris Lebenzon

Editor

Richard E Lehmann

Camera Operator

Samuel Lehmer

Adr/Dialogue Editor

Eric Leighton

Animation Supervisor

Eric Leighton

Animator

Ed Leonard

Other

Victoria B Lewis

Other

Phil Lofaro

Associate Producer

Phil Lofaro

Production Manager

Todd Lookinland

Other

Paula Lucchesi

Visual Effects

Ethan Marak

Other

Daniel Mason

Animator

Daniel Mason

Other

Sara Mast

Assistant

James Matlosz

Assistant

Michael Mcdowell

Writer (Adaptation)

Michael Mcdowell

Screenplay

Mark Mckenzie

Original Music

Tony Meagher

Other

Carl Miller

Assistant

Kat Miller

Assistant Production Coordinator

Diane Minter Lewis

Associate Producer

Theresa Repola Mohammed

Negative Cutting

Steve Moore

Storyboard Artist

Grace Murphy

Other

Shawn Murphy

Song

Shawn Murphy

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

Shawn Murphy

Music

Mark Musumeci

Consultant

Davia Nelson

Location Casting

Ben Nichols

Other

Cameron Noble

Assistant

Timothy Reid Norton

Other

Thomas J. O'connell

Adr Mixer

Gregg Olsson

Set Designer

Lionel Ivan Orozco

Other

Linda Overbey

Scenic Artist

Jenny Oznowicz

Apprentice

Rebecca Pahr

Other

Alessandro Palladini

Other

Bob Pauley

Storyboard Artist

Alice Payton

Other

Chris Peterson

Assistant

Syndi Pilar

Other

Terry Porter

Sound Re-Recording Mixer

John Pospisil

Sound Effects

Tony Preciado

Effects Assistant

Loyd Price

Animator

Tom Proost

Other

Facundo Rabaudi

Other

Chris Rand

Other

Jerome Ranft

3-D Models

Joe Ranft

Storyboard Artist

J.a.c. Redford

Music Conductor

Kevin Reher

Production Accountant

Marc Ribaud

Visual Effects

Jackie Roberts

Other

Film Details

Also Known As
The, Nightmare before Christmas 3D, Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas, étrange Noël de monsieur Jack
MPAA Rating
Genre
Comedy
Romance
Horror
Musical
Fantasy
Release Date
1993
Distribution Company
Walt Disney Studios Distribution
Location
San Francisco, California, USA

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m

Award Nominations

Best Visual Effects

1993

Articles

The Nightmare Before Christmas


The adventurous and idiosyncratic director Tim Burton got his start at, of all places, Walt Disney Studios. As he told Premiere magazine in 1993, "I was born in Burbank, right down the street from the Disney studio, and like a lot of people who grew up liking to draw, I thought Disney would be a great place to do it. But the turnaround period from dream to nightmare was about as quick as it could get." Burton fled the studio in 1984 but returned almost a decade later to face his nightmare, producing the cult favorite fairy tale about ennui and alienation, The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993).

In the early 1980s Disney features were about as safe and unadventurous as one could imagine; fortunately, the studio had a tradition of allowing for more experimentation in their short films. Young artist Tim Burton attended Disney's California Institute of the Arts (aka Cal Arts) after High School, and during his fellowship at the studio he completed two wildly eccentric personal projects. Vincent (1982) was a 6-minute black-and-white stop-motion animated short about a young suburban-dwelling boy with a macabre fascination for Vincent Price. Narrated in verse by Price himself, this was clearly a personal and autobiographical work of the type that rarely gets made in a studio environment. Burton's next film was an even more unlikely product from the "Mouse House": the 29-minute live-action Frankenweenie (1984), in which another suburban boy brings his dead dog back to life in the grand tradition of the Universal Horror films of the 1930s. It is to Disney's credit that these two Gothic and un-Disney films were produced at all; it should not be surprising that many other Burton ideas, designs, and scribbles went unproduced. Among those was an idea inspired by the classic 1960s TV specials of Burton's youth, like Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964). In the form of a poem, Burton told the story of Jack, the Pumpkin King of Halloween, visiting Christmastown and naively deciding that he would like to take a stab at playing Santa Claus just once. Burton designed three characters for this pitch idea – Jack, in his pin-striped pencil-thin suit with a bat for a bow tie; a ridiculously mountainous Santa Claus; and Jack's loyal dog Zero, a ghost sporting a pointy nose with a Rudolph-sized bulb at the end.

Following the success of Burton's first three feature-length films, Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), Beetlejuice (1988), and Batman (1989), the director was being courted by numerous studios. Burton himself was anxious to prove his worth outside of Warner Bros., where he had made these early hits. He rather naively asked Disney Studios for his Nightmare property, forgetting their claim on all ideas and artwork (i.e. "intellectual property") created while in their employ. "They signed your soul away in blood when you worked there," Burton later said. "They owned your firstborn." Fortunately, Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg was prepared to champion the project – he was a Burton fan. Burton was finishing Edward Scissorhands (1990) and was deep into preproduction for Batman Returns (1992), so he knew he would have to hand over the direction and hands-on work to another. He had the perfect person in mind – Henry Selick, a fellow survivor of the Disney development team from the early 1980s. As Burton later observed, "Henry was also working on a lot of projects [at Disney] that never got made. He couldn't take it there anymore. So we struck up a friendship. A 'Where the hell are we?' sort of thing." Following his initial stint at Disney, Selick became known for his eccentric stop-motion animation for film festival shorts and "bumpers" for the MTV cable network.

Burton also recruited Danny Elfman for The Nightmare Before Christmas; the Oingo Boingo frontman-turned film composer had already written the scores for all of Burton's features. All three principals – Burton, Selick, and Elfman – felt that the music in the film should be inseparable from the story, so the songs were written before the screenplay was finalized. A first draft screenplay was written (by Michael McDowell, credited in the final film for "adaptation"), and a final script was done by Caroline Thompson, who had written Edward Scissorhands. Armed with a budget of $22 Million, a script, and a soundtrack, Selick and Burton then had to accomplish something never before done in motion pictures – produce a feature film fully animated in stop-motion, with multiple characters and settings and live-action style camera movements.

Production was set up in a warehouse in San Francisco, Selick's home base, where more than 120 artists were assembled. Nineteen miniature sets were built, and multiple copies of each character had to be manufactured (beginning with an intricate custom-machined metal armature) so that animators could work simultaneously on multiple scenes with the same character. This crew, at maximum efficiency, turned out 70 seconds of finished film in a week. Animators working on The Nightmare Before Christmas employed techniques both old and new. Sweeping, intricate camera moves were programmed on computerized motion-control rigs which resulted in dazzling shots never before seen in a stop-motion film. At the same time, animators performed lip-synch on the puppets through use of replacement animation, a method that dated back to George Pal's Puppetoons of the 1940s. In replacement animation, a head is sculpted for every possible mouth position AND in every possible mood or expression. Each head is given a number and the animator must pop the appropriate head in place for each frame of film. For Jack, the animators had 700 different heads to choose from.

Disney was nervous enough about The Nightmare Before Christmas that it was released through its Touchstone Pictures imprint rather than under the Disney banner. One scene that had them on edge was a number performed by the villainous Oogie Boogie near the end of the film – it was designed as a tribute to the surreal Cab Calloway appearances in Fleischer cartoons of the 1930s, such as Minnie the Moocher (1932) and The Old Man of the Mountain (1933); it could have been interpreted as a racial stereotype by some not familiar with the jazz style being saluted. Tim Burton was given final cut on his film, and he allowed only a small snippet to be edited from the sequence.

The Nightmare Before Christmas premiered at the New York Film Festival in early October, 1993, and opened across the country later in the Halloween month, charming critics along the way. David Ansen of Newsweek wrote "You have to keep your eyes wide open while watching Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas. This giddily imaginative stop-motion animation musical is so stuffed with visual delights you won't want to blink....Tightly written by Caroline Thompson (Edward Scissorhands) and propelled by the clever lyrics and Kurt Weillish music of Danny Elfman, this cautionary fable (Be True to Your Ghoulish Self) may be a little too twisted for little kids but anyone 8 or older will spot the friendly glint behind Jack's empty eye sockets." Janet Maslin in The New York Times called the film a "delectably ghoulish fairy tale [that] blends the most likable aspects of Edward Scissorhands, Beetlejuice and Batman, and sends them off to Toyland. It also stamps the unmistakable Burton sensibility onto every frame....[The film] is a major step forward for both stop-motion animation, which is stunningly well used, and for Mr. Burton himself. He now moves from the level of extremely talented eccentric to that of Disney-style household word." Kenneth Turan wrote in The Los Angeles Times, "A live-action filmmaker with the soul of an animator, Burton has a taste for off-center, gruesome comedy - so off-putting when attached to real people, as it was in Batman Returns - but perfectly suited to these characters....Part avant-garde art film, part amusing but morbid fairy tale, it is a delightfully ghoulish holiday musical that displays more inventiveness in its brief 75 minutes than some studios can manage in an entire year."

The Nightmare Before Christmas grossed a respectable $48 Million on first release, but has become a cult favorite and has been reissued theatrically by Disney several times, satisfying that desire of Burton's to create a perennial holiday "special" like those that inspired him as a child. In 2006, Disney released the film in a 3D version; digital technology now allows studios with a hefty bankbook to create 3D versions of film footage that was originally shot "flat." Using CGI and a sort of reverse-engineered 3D modeling, a "left eye" view can be created to compliment the pre-existing "right eye" view. While this technique has looked awkward when applied to live-action (where the brain's innate face-recognition abilities can't be easily fooled), it works wonderfully for the abstract world of puppet animation. The original production design of The Nightmare Before Christmas is rich and dense almost to a fault, so 3D lends the film more clarity and an even greater sense of wonder.

Although it came from a huge crew of technicians, a major studio, and a creative team of three, The Nightmare Before Christmas features one of the most personal visions of any animated feature. Burton and Selick collaborated again, on the Roald Dahl adaptation James and the Giant Peach (1996), but The Nightmare Before Christmas will be the film that is revived and enjoyed somewhere every year, preferably in the Autumn when the denizens of Halloweentown are let out to play.

Producer: Tim Burton, Denise DiNovi
Director: Henry Selick
Screenplay: Caroline Thompson, Michael McDowell (adaptation), Tim Burton (story and characters)
Cinematography: Pete Kozachik
Film Editing: Stan Webb
Art Direction: Deane Taylor
Music: Danny Elfman
Voice Cast: Chris Sarandon (Jack Skellington), Danny Elfman (Jack Skellington - singing), Catherine O'Hara (Sally / Shock), William Hickey (Dr. Finkelstein), Glenn Shadix (Mayor), Paul Reubens (Lock), Ken Page (Oogie Boogie), Edward Ivory (Santa).
C-76m.

by John M. Miller

SOURCES:
Tim Burton: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker by Ken Hanke
Tim Burton: Interviews edited by Kristian Fraga
The Making of Tim Burton's 'The Nightmare Before Christmas' featurette on the deluxe Laserdisc edition
timburtoncollective.com
IMDB
The Nightmare Before Christmas

The Nightmare Before Christmas

The adventurous and idiosyncratic director Tim Burton got his start at, of all places, Walt Disney Studios. As he told Premiere magazine in 1993, "I was born in Burbank, right down the street from the Disney studio, and like a lot of people who grew up liking to draw, I thought Disney would be a great place to do it. But the turnaround period from dream to nightmare was about as quick as it could get." Burton fled the studio in 1984 but returned almost a decade later to face his nightmare, producing the cult favorite fairy tale about ennui and alienation, The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993). In the early 1980s Disney features were about as safe and unadventurous as one could imagine; fortunately, the studio had a tradition of allowing for more experimentation in their short films. Young artist Tim Burton attended Disney's California Institute of the Arts (aka Cal Arts) after High School, and during his fellowship at the studio he completed two wildly eccentric personal projects. Vincent (1982) was a 6-minute black-and-white stop-motion animated short about a young suburban-dwelling boy with a macabre fascination for Vincent Price. Narrated in verse by Price himself, this was clearly a personal and autobiographical work of the type that rarely gets made in a studio environment. Burton's next film was an even more unlikely product from the "Mouse House": the 29-minute live-action Frankenweenie (1984), in which another suburban boy brings his dead dog back to life in the grand tradition of the Universal Horror films of the 1930s. It is to Disney's credit that these two Gothic and un-Disney films were produced at all; it should not be surprising that many other Burton ideas, designs, and scribbles went unproduced. Among those was an idea inspired by the classic 1960s TV specials of Burton's youth, like Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964). In the form of a poem, Burton told the story of Jack, the Pumpkin King of Halloween, visiting Christmastown and naively deciding that he would like to take a stab at playing Santa Claus just once. Burton designed three characters for this pitch idea – Jack, in his pin-striped pencil-thin suit with a bat for a bow tie; a ridiculously mountainous Santa Claus; and Jack's loyal dog Zero, a ghost sporting a pointy nose with a Rudolph-sized bulb at the end. Following the success of Burton's first three feature-length films, Pee-wee's Big Adventure (1985), Beetlejuice (1988), and Batman (1989), the director was being courted by numerous studios. Burton himself was anxious to prove his worth outside of Warner Bros., where he had made these early hits. He rather naively asked Disney Studios for his Nightmare property, forgetting their claim on all ideas and artwork (i.e. "intellectual property") created while in their employ. "They signed your soul away in blood when you worked there," Burton later said. "They owned your firstborn." Fortunately, Disney chairman Jeffrey Katzenberg was prepared to champion the project – he was a Burton fan. Burton was finishing Edward Scissorhands (1990) and was deep into preproduction for Batman Returns (1992), so he knew he would have to hand over the direction and hands-on work to another. He had the perfect person in mind – Henry Selick, a fellow survivor of the Disney development team from the early 1980s. As Burton later observed, "Henry was also working on a lot of projects [at Disney] that never got made. He couldn't take it there anymore. So we struck up a friendship. A 'Where the hell are we?' sort of thing." Following his initial stint at Disney, Selick became known for his eccentric stop-motion animation for film festival shorts and "bumpers" for the MTV cable network. Burton also recruited Danny Elfman for The Nightmare Before Christmas; the Oingo Boingo frontman-turned film composer had already written the scores for all of Burton's features. All three principals – Burton, Selick, and Elfman – felt that the music in the film should be inseparable from the story, so the songs were written before the screenplay was finalized. A first draft screenplay was written (by Michael McDowell, credited in the final film for "adaptation"), and a final script was done by Caroline Thompson, who had written Edward Scissorhands. Armed with a budget of $22 Million, a script, and a soundtrack, Selick and Burton then had to accomplish something never before done in motion pictures – produce a feature film fully animated in stop-motion, with multiple characters and settings and live-action style camera movements. Production was set up in a warehouse in San Francisco, Selick's home base, where more than 120 artists were assembled. Nineteen miniature sets were built, and multiple copies of each character had to be manufactured (beginning with an intricate custom-machined metal armature) so that animators could work simultaneously on multiple scenes with the same character. This crew, at maximum efficiency, turned out 70 seconds of finished film in a week. Animators working on The Nightmare Before Christmas employed techniques both old and new. Sweeping, intricate camera moves were programmed on computerized motion-control rigs which resulted in dazzling shots never before seen in a stop-motion film. At the same time, animators performed lip-synch on the puppets through use of replacement animation, a method that dated back to George Pal's Puppetoons of the 1940s. In replacement animation, a head is sculpted for every possible mouth position AND in every possible mood or expression. Each head is given a number and the animator must pop the appropriate head in place for each frame of film. For Jack, the animators had 700 different heads to choose from. Disney was nervous enough about The Nightmare Before Christmas that it was released through its Touchstone Pictures imprint rather than under the Disney banner. One scene that had them on edge was a number performed by the villainous Oogie Boogie near the end of the film – it was designed as a tribute to the surreal Cab Calloway appearances in Fleischer cartoons of the 1930s, such as Minnie the Moocher (1932) and The Old Man of the Mountain (1933); it could have been interpreted as a racial stereotype by some not familiar with the jazz style being saluted. Tim Burton was given final cut on his film, and he allowed only a small snippet to be edited from the sequence. The Nightmare Before Christmas premiered at the New York Film Festival in early October, 1993, and opened across the country later in the Halloween month, charming critics along the way. David Ansen of Newsweek wrote "You have to keep your eyes wide open while watching Tim Burton's The Nightmare Before Christmas. This giddily imaginative stop-motion animation musical is so stuffed with visual delights you won't want to blink....Tightly written by Caroline Thompson (Edward Scissorhands) and propelled by the clever lyrics and Kurt Weillish music of Danny Elfman, this cautionary fable (Be True to Your Ghoulish Self) may be a little too twisted for little kids but anyone 8 or older will spot the friendly glint behind Jack's empty eye sockets." Janet Maslin in The New York Times called the film a "delectably ghoulish fairy tale [that] blends the most likable aspects of Edward Scissorhands, Beetlejuice and Batman, and sends them off to Toyland. It also stamps the unmistakable Burton sensibility onto every frame....[The film] is a major step forward for both stop-motion animation, which is stunningly well used, and for Mr. Burton himself. He now moves from the level of extremely talented eccentric to that of Disney-style household word." Kenneth Turan wrote in The Los Angeles Times, "A live-action filmmaker with the soul of an animator, Burton has a taste for off-center, gruesome comedy - so off-putting when attached to real people, as it was in Batman Returns - but perfectly suited to these characters....Part avant-garde art film, part amusing but morbid fairy tale, it is a delightfully ghoulish holiday musical that displays more inventiveness in its brief 75 minutes than some studios can manage in an entire year." The Nightmare Before Christmas grossed a respectable $48 Million on first release, but has become a cult favorite and has been reissued theatrically by Disney several times, satisfying that desire of Burton's to create a perennial holiday "special" like those that inspired him as a child. In 2006, Disney released the film in a 3D version; digital technology now allows studios with a hefty bankbook to create 3D versions of film footage that was originally shot "flat." Using CGI and a sort of reverse-engineered 3D modeling, a "left eye" view can be created to compliment the pre-existing "right eye" view. While this technique has looked awkward when applied to live-action (where the brain's innate face-recognition abilities can't be easily fooled), it works wonderfully for the abstract world of puppet animation. The original production design of The Nightmare Before Christmas is rich and dense almost to a fault, so 3D lends the film more clarity and an even greater sense of wonder. Although it came from a huge crew of technicians, a major studio, and a creative team of three, The Nightmare Before Christmas features one of the most personal visions of any animated feature. Burton and Selick collaborated again, on the Roald Dahl adaptation James and the Giant Peach (1996), but The Nightmare Before Christmas will be the film that is revived and enjoyed somewhere every year, preferably in the Autumn when the denizens of Halloweentown are let out to play. Producer: Tim Burton, Denise DiNovi Director: Henry Selick Screenplay: Caroline Thompson, Michael McDowell (adaptation), Tim Burton (story and characters) Cinematography: Pete Kozachik Film Editing: Stan Webb Art Direction: Deane Taylor Music: Danny Elfman Voice Cast: Chris Sarandon (Jack Skellington), Danny Elfman (Jack Skellington - singing), Catherine O'Hara (Sally / Shock), William Hickey (Dr. Finkelstein), Glenn Shadix (Mayor), Paul Reubens (Lock), Ken Page (Oogie Boogie), Edward Ivory (Santa). C-76m. by John M. Miller SOURCES: Tim Burton: An Unauthorized Biography of the Filmmaker by Ken Hanke Tim Burton: Interviews edited by Kristian Fraga The Making of Tim Burton's 'The Nightmare Before Christmas' featurette on the deluxe Laserdisc edition timburtoncollective.com IMDB

Quotes

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States on Video September 27, 1994

Released in United States September 1994

Released in United States September 2009

Re-released in United States October 23, 2009

Wide Release in United States October 22, 1993

Shown at Deauville Film Festival September 2-11, 1994.

Shown at London Film Festival November 3-20, 1994.

Shown at New York Film Festival October 1-17, 1993.

Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival (Velodrome) September 18-26, 2009.

Shown at Sitges International Festival of Fantasy & Horror Film October 7-15, 1994.

Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) September 1-12, 1994.

Feature directorial debut for Henry Selick who previously created numerous station identifications for MTV.

Began shooting August 1, 1991.

Completed shooting June 1993.

Film employs stop-motion animation rather than the more traditional cel animation technique. Unlike the latter, which is two-dimensional, the former is three-dimensional and involves the use of miniature sets and puppets which are painstakingly staged and photographed frame by frame.

The 32nd animated feature from the Walt Disney Company and the first to bear the Touchstone label.

3-D re-release in USA October 19, 2007.

3-D re-release in USA October 20, 2006.

3-D re-release scheduled in USA October 23, 2009.

Released in United States September 1994 (Shown at Deauville Film Festival September 2-11, 1994.)

Released in United States September 1994 (Shown at Venice Film Festival (Venetian Nights) September 1-12, 1994.)

Released in United States September 2009 (Shown at San Sebastian International Film Festival (Velodrome) September 18-26, 2009.)

Released in United States on Video September 27, 1994

Released in United States October 1993 (Shown at New York Film Festival October 1-17, 1993.)

Released in United States October 1994 (Shown at Sitges International Festival of Fantasy & Horror Film October 7-15, 1994.)

Released in United States Fall October 13, 1993

Released in United States October 15, 1993 (Los Angeles)

Wide Release in United States October 22, 1993

Re-released in United States October 23, 2009

Expanded Release in United States October 29, 1993

Limited re-release in United States October 27, 2000

Released in United States Fall October 13, 1993

Released in United States November 1994

Released in United States October 15, 1993

Released in United States October 1993

Released in United States October 1994

Limited re-release in United States October 27, 2000

Expanded Release in United States October 29, 1993

Released in United States November 1994 (Shown at London Film Festival November 3-20, 1994.)