The Thrill of Brazil


1h 31m 1946
The Thrill of Brazil

Brief Synopsis

A theater producer is torn between his leading lady and his ex-wife while staging a show in Rio.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rio
Genre
Romance
Musical
Release Date
Sep 30, 1946
Premiere Information
New York opening: 5 Sept 1946
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Synopsis

Before taking his musical revue to New York, stage producer Steve Farraugh tries out his new show in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The star of Steve's show, Linda Lorens, is in love with Steve, but Steve still carries a torch for his ex-wife, Vicki Dean, an accomplished stage director. Band leader Tito Guizar, meanwhile, is smitten with Linda, but she pays him no attention. Seeking Steve's signature on the final divorce papers, Vicki arrives in Rio with her new fiancé, the staid toothpaste manufacturer John Harbour. Although Steve has already signed the papers once, Vicki has returned to make certain that he resigns them without using his pen filled with disappearing ink. While stalling for time, Steve attempts to win back his ex-wife by purposely making the show finale such a flop that she will be unable to resist the urge to fix it. Vicki, however, sees through Steve's plan to play on her love of show business and demands that he immediately sign the papers. Despite his best efforts to make a nuisance of himself and scare off John, Steve eventually concedes defeat and grants Vicki's wish. After signing the papers, Steve hires taxi driver Irkie Bowers to steal them from John and Vicki, along with their plane tickets, just as they are about to leave Rio. As the police are sympathetic to Steve, Vicki is left with no alternative but to accept his offer of help in exchange for her promise to direct the troupe in rehearsals. Steve's plan goes awry, however, when Irkie discovers that the check Steve gave him has been signed with disappearing ink. Irkie returns to Steve's club seeking revenge, and tells Linda about Steve's scheme. Together, Linda and Irkie search for Steve, who has joined Vicki and John on a sightseeing trip. Chaos ensues when Irkie tries to take Steve's wallet from him. The police arrive just as a brawl breaks out, and Steve quickly tosses the wallet into the lap of a Brazilian bystander. All but Steve are arrested and thrown in jail. Before bailing out his friends, Steve has a photographer snap a picture of John behind bars. The resulting international scandal forces John to leave immediately for Buenos Aires to prevent the dissolution of an important business deal. When the Brazilian man who caught John's stolen wallet tries to return it to its owner, Linda manages to intercept it by telling the man that she is John's wife. Steve later attempts to take the wallet from Linda, but she insists on giving it to Vicki. With his scheme now fully exposed, Steve gives up and confesses to Vicki, all the while insisting that his tricks were done in the hope of winning her back. Steve's fortunes change for the better, though, when he learns that Vicki knew all along that his disappearing ink signature could be brought back to life with lemon juice. He now realizes that she came to Rio because she loves him.

Film Details

Also Known As
Rio
Genre
Romance
Musical
Release Date
Sep 30, 1946
Premiere Information
New York opening: 5 Sept 1946
Production Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 31m
Sound
Mono
Color
Black and White
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1
Film Length
10 reels

Articles

The Thrill of Brazil


In the 1946 musical comedy The Thrill of Brazil Keenan Wynn plays Steve Farraugh, a Broadway producer putting the finishing touches on a spectacular Broadway-bound show in Brazil. When his estranged wife Vicki (Evelyn Keyes) comes to town with divorce papers and a new fiancé in tow (Allyn Joslyn), Steve pulls out all the stops to win her back. Ann Miller plays the supporting role of Linda Lorens, a star dancer who has her sights set on Steve.

The Thrill of Brazil is a loose adaptation of the famous rapid-fire 1928 play The Front Page written by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. The Front Page was adapted for the silver screen several times, most notably in 1931's The Front Page with Adolphe Menjou and Pat O'Brien and the 1940 classic His Girl Friday with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell. Columbia Studios simply changed the newsroom setting to the backstage world of show business and added singing and dancing.

For co-star Ann Miller, The Thrill of Brazil marked her final film at Columbia after being under contract to the studio for five years. The making of the film represented a stressful time for the famed tapper. She married first husband Reese Milner in the middle of shooting The Thrill of Brazil and returned to the set pregnant following a two week honeymoon. Her new husband was determined that she give up her acting career and walk off the film immediately, which would mean breaking her lucrative long-term contract with the studio. Miller insisted on completing the film, however, but promised to quit the business as soon as it was done.

Miller's pregnancy made shooting the film's splashy finale the most difficult part of making The Thrill of Brazil for her. "For this, I had to climb way up high on a big platform to dance," she explained in her 1972 autobiography Miller's High Life. "Ordinarily this wouldn't bother me but because of my pregnancy I was frightened that I would get dizzy and fall. I was so nervous about it that we had to do the scene over and over." When shooting was complete, Miller kept her promise to her husband and walked out on her contract with Columbia. Studio head Harry Cohn was furious and sued the couple for breach of contract. The case was settled out of court.

Despite Miller's difficulties, her spectacular dancing captures some of the film's best moments in numbers such as "The Custom House" and "Man Is Brother to a Mule." Other film highlights include routines by the elegant dancing team of Veloz and Yolanda and the vocal talents of Tito Guizar who performs "Copa-Cabana" and the exuberant title song.

Producers: Sydney Bidell, Allen Rivkin
Director: S. Sylvan Simon
Screenplay: Harry Clork, Devery Freeman, Allen Rivkin
Cinematography: Charles Lawton
Art Direction: Stephen Goosson, Van Nest Polglase, A. Leslie Thomas
Music: Leo Arnaud (uncredited)
Film Editing: Charles Nelson
Cast: Evelyn Keyes (Vicki Dean), Keenan Wynn (Steve Farraugh), Ann Miller (Linda Lorens), Allyn Joslyn (John Habour), Tito Guizar (Tito Guizar), Veloz (Veloz), Yolanda (Yolanda), Felix Bressart (Ludwig Kriegspiel), Sid Tomack (Irikie Bowers), Enric Madriguera and his Orchestra (Themselves)
BW-92m.

by Andrea Passafiume
The Thrill Of Brazil

The Thrill of Brazil

In the 1946 musical comedy The Thrill of Brazil Keenan Wynn plays Steve Farraugh, a Broadway producer putting the finishing touches on a spectacular Broadway-bound show in Brazil. When his estranged wife Vicki (Evelyn Keyes) comes to town with divorce papers and a new fiancé in tow (Allyn Joslyn), Steve pulls out all the stops to win her back. Ann Miller plays the supporting role of Linda Lorens, a star dancer who has her sights set on Steve. The Thrill of Brazil is a loose adaptation of the famous rapid-fire 1928 play The Front Page written by Ben Hecht and Charles MacArthur. The Front Page was adapted for the silver screen several times, most notably in 1931's The Front Page with Adolphe Menjou and Pat O'Brien and the 1940 classic His Girl Friday with Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell. Columbia Studios simply changed the newsroom setting to the backstage world of show business and added singing and dancing. For co-star Ann Miller, The Thrill of Brazil marked her final film at Columbia after being under contract to the studio for five years. The making of the film represented a stressful time for the famed tapper. She married first husband Reese Milner in the middle of shooting The Thrill of Brazil and returned to the set pregnant following a two week honeymoon. Her new husband was determined that she give up her acting career and walk off the film immediately, which would mean breaking her lucrative long-term contract with the studio. Miller insisted on completing the film, however, but promised to quit the business as soon as it was done. Miller's pregnancy made shooting the film's splashy finale the most difficult part of making The Thrill of Brazil for her. "For this, I had to climb way up high on a big platform to dance," she explained in her 1972 autobiography Miller's High Life. "Ordinarily this wouldn't bother me but because of my pregnancy I was frightened that I would get dizzy and fall. I was so nervous about it that we had to do the scene over and over." When shooting was complete, Miller kept her promise to her husband and walked out on her contract with Columbia. Studio head Harry Cohn was furious and sued the couple for breach of contract. The case was settled out of court. Despite Miller's difficulties, her spectacular dancing captures some of the film's best moments in numbers such as "The Custom House" and "Man Is Brother to a Mule." Other film highlights include routines by the elegant dancing team of Veloz and Yolanda and the vocal talents of Tito Guizar who performs "Copa-Cabana" and the exuberant title song. Producers: Sydney Bidell, Allen Rivkin Director: S. Sylvan Simon Screenplay: Harry Clork, Devery Freeman, Allen Rivkin Cinematography: Charles Lawton Art Direction: Stephen Goosson, Van Nest Polglase, A. Leslie Thomas Music: Leo Arnaud (uncredited) Film Editing: Charles Nelson Cast: Evelyn Keyes (Vicki Dean), Keenan Wynn (Steve Farraugh), Ann Miller (Linda Lorens), Allyn Joslyn (John Habour), Tito Guizar (Tito Guizar), Veloz (Veloz), Yolanda (Yolanda), Felix Bressart (Ludwig Kriegspiel), Sid Tomack (Irikie Bowers), Enric Madriguera and his Orchestra (Themselves) BW-92m. by Andrea Passafiume

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title for this film was Rio. Columbia borrowed actor Keenan Wynn, director S. Sylvan Simon and dance director Eugene Loring from M-G-M for the production. Actor Allyn Joslyn was borrowed from Twentieth Century-Fox. A pre-production Hollywood Reporter news item indicates that Melvyn Douglas was originally set for the role played by Keenan Wynn. Lee Bowman replaced Douglas but left the picture in late April due to an illness. Although a still photograph indicates that dancers Carol Haney and Virginia Hunter were cast in the production, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Fall September 30, 1946

Released in United States Fall September 30, 1946