3 for Bedroom C


1h 14m 1952

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 21, 1952
Premiere Information
New York opening: 26 Jun 1952
Production Company
Brenco Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Pasadena, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel 3 for Bedroom C by Goddard Lieberson (Garden City, NY, 1947).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Naturalcolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Synopsis

In Chicago, Dr. Oliphant J. Thrumm, a highly respected Harvard professor of bio-chemistry, disentangles himself from a crowd of science-minded admirers and boards the Santa Fe Super Chief transcontinental train heading for Pasadena, where he will be delivering a speech to colleagues at the Pacific Institute of Technology. Inside, he finds that his sleeping room, bedroom C, has been appropriated by a woman, Ann Haven, her young adopted daughter Barbara, and Barbara's two pet turtles. Explaining that she has an urgent need to get to Los Angeles and was unable to obtain last-minute Pullman reservations, Ann uses all her charms on the shy professor, who obligingly arranges with the porter, Fred Johnson, to give up his room and bunk in the gentlemen's lounge. Over cocktails, Oli responds to Ann's flirtations, but Ann also finds herself smitten. Later, the knowledgeable Fred, who is a follower of Oli's scientific triumphs, explains to him that Ann is an Academy Award-winning actress and one of the most famous movie stars in the world. Having lived a sheltered life in his chemistry lab, Oli has never heard of Ann, yet is troubled to hear about her many romances as reported by movie magazines. Later, wondering if Ann has been toying with him, he asks her about her admirers, and Ann explains that, like other women, she seeks a home and security. The next morning, Ann's manager, Johnny Pizer, shows up, troubled that Ann left New York abruptly without telling him. After finding the independent Barbara dining alone, Pizer tricks her into revealing Ann's location and misinterprets her innocent remark that they spent the night sleeping in a man's bedroom. Pizer proceeds to bedroom C and wakes up Ann, who is not happy to see him. Angry at the studio and Pizer for the quality of pictures she has been recently offered and assigned to, she says she is charging across the country with plans to break her contract. As she and Pizer argue, Oli meets Jack Bleck, an ulcer-plagued Hollywood press agent, in the dining car. They engage in a friendly conversation until Pizer shows up to complain to Bleck about Ann, then Oli leaves, uneasy. Bleck tells Pizer about his own troubles with temperamental stage actor Conde Marlow, who, with the help of Bleck's publicity, is an up-and-coming star and also a passenger on the Super Chief. Believing that Ann and Marlow might be a good box office combination, Pizer and Bleck make dinner plans for the four of them to work out a deal. At a station stop, Ann and Oli step out for some air, where she is approached by autograph-seeking fans. She then tries to explain to Oli how the people in her profession are good, but have different ways. As this will be their last evening together on the train, Oli wants to have a special dinner with Ann, but Ann breaks their date after Pizer convinces her that, for the sake of her career, she must meet with Marlow and Bleck. Unable to understand that Ann's motive is purely business, a dejected Oli goes off to be alone, but encounters Bleck, who invites him to the dinner. Oli shows up, unaware that Ann is there, and sees Marlow and Ann talking. Mistaking Marlow for a romantic rival, he leaves quietly, but shows up at the bedroom later to magnanimously tell Ann he forgives her. He is confused when she responds with anger and then when Pizer also shows up, the three quarrel. Finally, a tearful Ann claims that she hates Oli and leaves, but Fred, who has witnessed the scene, advises Oli to pursue her. However, Oli, admitting that he always seems to say the wrong thing, is reluctant, so Fred suggests that he write his feelings to her in a letter. The next day, as the train nears the Pasadena station, Ann has not responded to his letter, so Oli, believing the romance is over, disembarks to meet his waiting colleagues. Barbara runs out to return his letter, asking him to read Ann's response, which, she informs him, says "I love you." When Ann comes out of the train, they reunite as press photographers take pictures.

Film Details

Release Date
Jun 21, 1952
Premiere Information
New York opening: 26 Jun 1952
Production Company
Brenco Pictures Corp.
Distribution Company
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
Country
United States
Location
Pasadena, California, United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel 3 for Bedroom C by Goddard Lieberson (Garden City, NY, 1947).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 14m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (Naturalcolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.37 : 1

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to production notes, Three for Bedroom C used Pullman cars on loan from the Santa Fe Railway, which were taken apart and reconstructed on Stage 10 in Studio City. Three scenes were shot on location in Pasadena and other railway stations. All other scenes took place inside the train set. Both the Variety and Hollywood Reporter reviews noted that the character "Conde Marlow" was a take-off on actor Marlon Brando. Three for Bedroom C, Gloria Swanson's first film after Sunset Blvd., marked writer Milton H. Bren's directorial debut.