They Call Me MISTER Tibbs


1h 48m 1970
They Call Me MISTER Tibbs

Brief Synopsis

A police detective's investigation of a prostitute's murder points to his best friend.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Mystery
Sequel
Release Date
Jan 1970
Premiere Information
New York opening: 8 Jul 1970
Production Company
Mirisch Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the character created by John Dudley Ball.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Synopsis

Det. Lieut. Virgil Tibbs of the San Francisco homicide squad receives an anonymous phone call accusing his close friend, community activist Rev. Logan Sharpe, of murdering a prostitute. The detective questions the clergyman, who admits having visited the victim to bestow pastoral counsel. Other suspects include Rice Weedon, a landlord and narcotics dealer whom Tibbs shoots in self-defense; black janitor Mealie; and Woody Garfield, the victim's protector. Again confronted by Tibbs, Sharpe confesses his guilt, revealing that the prostitute had mocked his sexual prowess, and begging Tibbs to defer arrest until after a referendum on a community control issue Sharpe supports. When the officer refuses, the activist throws himself under a passing truck.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
Genre
Drama
Action
Crime
Mystery
Sequel
Release Date
Jan 1970
Premiere Information
New York opening: 8 Jul 1970
Production Company
Mirisch Productions, Inc.
Distribution Company
United Artists Corp.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the character created by John Dudley Ball.

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 48m
Sound
Mono
Color
Color (DeLuxe)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.85 : 1

Articles

They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!


1967 saw Sidney Poitier in In The Heat of the Night, a groundbreaking Sixties film with Poitier as Lieutenant Virgil Tibbs, a Philadelphia detective sent to investigate a murder and butt heads with a small-town Southern police chief (Rod Steiger). Faced with racially-charged hostility and resentment, Tibbs pursued the facts of the case doggedly and won the grudging respect of his law-enforcement counterpart Chief Gillespie.

By 1970, Tibbs' situation had changed somewhat; the policeman had relocated to San Francisco and was faced with problems at home, with a rocky marriage and a rebellious adolescent son. When he's assigned to the murder of a prostitute, all the evidence points towards his friend, Reverend Logan Sharpe (Martin Landau). They Call Me MISTER Tibbs! dispenses with much of In The Heat of the Night's racial complexities (with no Steiger to serve as Poitier's foil), and winds up more along the lines of a pure action picture. With Quincy Jones' funky score and Tibbs' early-Seventies fashions, it almost has the feel of a 'blaxploitation' film from the period.

Director Gordon Douglas, veteran of films such as Slaughter's Big Rip-Off (1973), Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964) and the Fifties big-bug saga Them! (1954) provided plenty of punch for Tibbs' action segments. Don't go in expecting a great deal of social commentary, and They Call Me MISTER Tibbs! delivers a satisfying bill of goods.

Director: Gordon Douglas
Producer: Herbert Hirschman, Walter Mirisch (executive)
Screenplay: Alan Trustman, James R. Webb
Cinematography: Gerald Perry Finnerman
Music: Quincy Jones
Art Direction: Addison Hehr
Cast: Sidney Poitier (Lieutenant Virgil Tibbs), Martin Landau (Reverend Logan Sharpe), Barbara McNair (Valerie Tibbs), Anthony Zerbe (Rice Weedon), Edward Asner (Woody Garfield), Jeff Corey (Captain Hank Marden), Norma Crane (Marge Garfield).
C-108m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning.

by Jerry Renshaw
They Call Me Mister Tibbs!

They Call Me MISTER Tibbs!

1967 saw Sidney Poitier in In The Heat of the Night, a groundbreaking Sixties film with Poitier as Lieutenant Virgil Tibbs, a Philadelphia detective sent to investigate a murder and butt heads with a small-town Southern police chief (Rod Steiger). Faced with racially-charged hostility and resentment, Tibbs pursued the facts of the case doggedly and won the grudging respect of his law-enforcement counterpart Chief Gillespie. By 1970, Tibbs' situation had changed somewhat; the policeman had relocated to San Francisco and was faced with problems at home, with a rocky marriage and a rebellious adolescent son. When he's assigned to the murder of a prostitute, all the evidence points towards his friend, Reverend Logan Sharpe (Martin Landau). They Call Me MISTER Tibbs! dispenses with much of In The Heat of the Night's racial complexities (with no Steiger to serve as Poitier's foil), and winds up more along the lines of a pure action picture. With Quincy Jones' funky score and Tibbs' early-Seventies fashions, it almost has the feel of a 'blaxploitation' film from the period. Director Gordon Douglas, veteran of films such as Slaughter's Big Rip-Off (1973), Robin and the 7 Hoods (1964) and the Fifties big-bug saga Them! (1954) provided plenty of punch for Tibbs' action segments. Don't go in expecting a great deal of social commentary, and They Call Me MISTER Tibbs! delivers a satisfying bill of goods. Director: Gordon Douglas Producer: Herbert Hirschman, Walter Mirisch (executive) Screenplay: Alan Trustman, James R. Webb Cinematography: Gerald Perry Finnerman Music: Quincy Jones Art Direction: Addison Hehr Cast: Sidney Poitier (Lieutenant Virgil Tibbs), Martin Landau (Reverend Logan Sharpe), Barbara McNair (Valerie Tibbs), Anthony Zerbe (Rice Weedon), Edward Asner (Woody Garfield), Jeff Corey (Captain Hank Marden), Norma Crane (Marge Garfield). C-108m. Letterboxed. Closed captioning. by Jerry Renshaw

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

Location scenes filmed in San Francisco. Sidney Poitier had originated the role of "Virgil Tibbs" in 1967's In the Heat of the Night and revised the role in 1971's The Organization. They Call Me MISTER Tibbs marked the last film appearance of noted African-American character actor Juano Hernandez (1901-1970).

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1970

Sequel to "In the Heat of the Night" (1967) directed by Norman Jewison.

Released in United States 1970