These Thirty Years


60m 1934

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Caravel Films, Inc.; Ford Motor Co.
Distribution Company
Ford Motor Co.; State Rights
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
60m

Synopsis

At the turn-of-the-century, Dave Haines, the son of a farmer, becomes infatuated with Henry T. Ford's "horseless carriage" and, filled with ambition, goes to Detroit to acquire a permit to sell the new contraption. Dave convinces his skeptical small town neighbors about the promising future of the automobile, and together they open the first car dealership in the area. Many years later, Dave, whose dealership has grown and prospered with the times, has to go abroad for health reasons. Before leaving, he entrusts his son Robert to watch over his interest in the dealership, but Robert, filled with disdain for the car business, invests all of his father's money, including the mortgage on the family farm, playing the stock market. When the stock market crashes in 1929, Robert, who is in love with Mae Lercombe, a banker's daughter, discovers that he has lost everything. Fortunately, Jed Travers, his father's longtime partner, learns of Robert's plight and helps him to recoup his losses and save the dealership and the farm. In the end, Robert, having learned that happiness comes only from hard work and sacrifice, returns to his father and the car business.

Film Details

Release Date
Jan 1934
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Caravel Films, Inc.; Ford Motor Co.
Distribution Company
Ford Motor Co.; State Rights
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
60m

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

According to New York State Censor Board records, this film was made and distributed by the Ford Motor Co. The 1934 New York Times review, however, lists Caravel Films, a New York-based producer of industrial films, as the production company. The film was submitted to the New York State Censor Board in both December 1933 and June 1934. By June 1934, it had been cut from 8,200 to 7,200 feet. The New York Times reviewer noted that many of the actors in this film were from the "local Broadway stage." Reviews conflict on writing credits. The New York Times lists James Creelman with the story, while Film Daily credits Phil Stong as "author" and Dave Pincus as "adaptor." In spite of its dramatic narrative, Film Daily lists the film as an "industrial."