That Other Woman


1h 15m 1942

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 13, 1942
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m
Film Length
6,852ft (8 reels)

Synopsis

Secretary Emily Borden is in love with her boss, architect Henry Summers, and despairs that he will ever look beyond her efficiency to notice that she is a beautiful woman. She is also angered by the fact that he neglects his work in order to chase after other women. One night as they are working late, not even Emily's call to her boyfriend, Southerner Ralph Cobb, can provoke Henry's interest. When she returns home that evening, Emily confides her woes to her Grandma, and as Emily gets progressively more tipsy, Grandma describes how she wooed her husband with a series of mysterious letters. Emily copies one of the letters out on pink, perfumed paper and signs it "the pink lady." It is delivered to Henry's office the next morning, and by the time Emily remembers that she wrote it, it is too late to retrieve it from Henry, who is thrilled by the seductive missive from a secret admirer. The letter asks Henry to meet the pink lady at a beach resort, where she will be wearing a striped bathing suit, and Grandma forces Emily to go. When Henry spots her, however, he still cannot see her in a romantic light and assumes that it is a coincidence. Emily does not tell the truth to avoid embarrassment, but when Henry insists on spending another evening working together, Grandma decides to write him another letter. In the latest letter, the pink lady states that she could not attend their rendezvous because of her insanely jealous boyfriend, who happens to be a gangster. Assuming that he is going to be shot at any moment, Henry panics and decides to leave town. He needs Emily to accompany him so that they can complete a major project, and through Grandma's machinations, they wind up alone at Henry's fishing cottage in Connecticut. Grandma also insures that Ralph follows them, and because Henry does not know who he is, he assumes that Ralph is the pink lady's gangster boyfriend. In order to escape from Ralph, Henry and Emily retreat to a secret clearing nearby, and as they spend the evening in front of the campfire, Henry realizes that he is in love with Emily. In the morning, they return to town, where Henry hires lawyers and a private investigator to clear up the confusion with the pink lady so that he will be free to marry Emily. Worried that she will be discovered, Emily writes another letter stating that the pink lady is moving to Florida, but the eager light in Henry's eyes convinces her that he will always be a "chaser through and through," and she breaks off their romance. Henry tries to call her but she refuses to speak to him, and when he goes to her house, he finds the pink stationary and deduces that she was his secret admirer. He then sends her a telegram stating that he is going to meet the pink lady in the park tomorrow if everything is over between them. Afraid that one of Henry's old girl friends is trying to take advantage of him, Emily meets him in the park, where he tells her that he knows the truth. The couple then kiss and are reconciled.

Film Details

Release Date
Nov 13, 1942
Premiere Information
not available
Production Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Distribution Company
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Country
United States

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 15m
Film Length
6,852ft (8 reels)

Quotes

Trivia

Notes

The working title of this film was Leap Year, which was also the title of Lamar Trotti's original story. According to a September 4, 1941 memo in the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts-Special Collections Library, Trotti wrote the story "sometime ago" and sold it to the studio for one dollar when producer Walter Morosco decided to make it as a "low budget picture." Although the legal records indicate that Jerry Sackheim worked on a screenplay for the picture, the extent of his contribution to the completed film has not been determined. According to a Hollywood Reporter news item, Lynn Bari was originally set in the role of "Emily Borden," but after the picture had been shooting for eight days, she was moved into the lead role in China Girl, and was replaced by Virginia Gilmore.