That Darn Cat


1h 56m 1965

Brief Synopsis

A woman is kidnapped. While in captivity, she manages to send a message out with a wandering cat. The cat's owner calls the FBI. The FBI tries to follow the cat. Jealous boyfriends and nosy neighbours also get in the act.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Crime
Release Date
Jan 1965
Premiere Information
New York opening: 2 Dec 1965
Production Company
Walt Disney Productions
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Co., Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Undercover Cat by Gordon Gordon, Mildred Gordon (Garden City, New York, 1963).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.75 : 1

Synopsis

Two sisters, Ingrid and Patti Randall, are temporarily alone in their suburban home with "That Darn Cat," nicknamed DC. At night, DC roams free, courting a female cat and following Iggy, who carries a piece of salmon. Iggy and Dan, two bank robbers, are holding Margaret Miller hostage while hiding from the police. Iggy decides to let DC in and feed him; and while DC is in the apartment, Margaret takes off his collar and substitutes her watch scratched with the word "Help." At the Randalls, Patti spends the evening with her boyfriend, Canoe, and Ingrid accepts a dinner invitation from Gregory Benson, an accountant whom she does not like. When DC steals the dinner, Gregory threatens to shoot him. Patti finds Margaret's watch and wants to call the police, but Ingrid forbids it, so Patti calls the FBI. Supervisor Newton assigns Zeke Kelso to the case, and Kelso assigns three agents to tail DC, but the cat eludes them. Meanwhile, all the action at the Randall house is watched by Mrs. MacDougall, a snoopy neighbor. With a bugging device implanted in his collar, DC leads Zeke into a chase at a drive-in movie and through Gregory's backyard, where Gregory shoots at them. Later Gregory finds Ingrid and Zeke alone together and breaks up with Ingrid. On the third night of being tailed, DC is followed by Zeke, Patti, Canoe, and Mrs. MacDougall. Patti and Zeke rescue Margaret, and the next day DC visits his mate and their new litter of kittens.

Film Details

MPAA Rating
G
Genre
Adaptation
Comedy
Crime
Release Date
Jan 1965
Premiere Information
New York opening: 2 Dec 1965
Production Company
Walt Disney Productions
Distribution Company
Buena Vista Distribution Co., Inc.
Country
United States
Screenplay Information
Based on the novel Undercover Cat by Gordon Gordon, Mildred Gordon (Garden City, New York, 1963).

Technical Specs

Duration
1h 56m
Sound
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Color
Color (Technicolor)
Theatrical Aspect Ratio
1.75 : 1

Articles

Frank Gorshin (1933-2005)


Frank Gorshin, a skilled comedian, impressionist and character actor who will forever be indentified with his role as "The Riddler" on the cult series from the '60s Batman lost his battle with lung cancer on May 17 at the Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California. He was 72.

He was born on April 5, 1933, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania into a family of modest means, his father was a railroad worker and mother a homemaker. His childhood impressions of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney paid off when he won a local talent contest at 17, and that led to his first gig at 17 at a the prize was a one week engagement at Jackie Heller's Carousel night club, Pittsburgh's hottest downtown spot in the day. The taste was there, and after high school Frank enrolled in the Carnegie-Mellon Tech School of Drama did hone his craft.

His career was interrupted briefly when he entered the US Army in 1953. He spent two years in Special Services as an entertainer. Once he got out, Frank tried his luck in Hollywood. He made his film debut in a forgettable William Holden vehicle The Proud and Profane, but his fortunes picked up soon when he and when he hooked up with American Internation Pictures (AIP). With his charasmatic sneer and cocky bravado that belied his slender, 5' 7" frame, Frank made a great punk villian in a series of entertaining "drive-in" fare: Hot Rod Girl (1956), Dragstrip Girl, Invasion of the Saucer Men, and of course the classic Portland Expose (all 1957).

By the '60s, he graduated to supporting roles in bigger Hollywood fare: Where the Boys Are, Bells Are Ringing (both 1960), Ring of Fire, and his biggest tole to date, that of Iggy the bank robber in Disney's hugely popular That Darn Cat (1965). Better still, Frank found some parts on television: Naked City, Combat!, The Untouchables, and this would be the medium where he found his greatest success. Little did he realize that when his skeletal physique donned those green nylon tights and cackled his high pitch laugh that Frank Gorshin would be forever identified as "the Riddler," one of Batman's main nemisis. For two years (1966-68), he was a semi-regular on the show and it brought him deserved national attention.

By the '70s, Frank made his Broadway debut, as the star of Jimmy, a musical based on the life of former New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker. He spent the next two decades alternating between the stage, where he appeared regularly in national touring productions of such popular shows as: Promises, Promises, Prisoner of Second Street, and Guys and Dolls; and nightclub work in Los Angeles and Las Vegas.

He recently found himself in demand for character roles on televison: Murder, She Wrote, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and film: Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys (1995), and the quirky comedy Man of the Century (1999). Yet his biggest triumph was his two year stint (2002-2004) as George Burns in the Broadway smash, Say Goodnight Gracie. It ran for 364 performances and he received critical raves from even the toughest New York theater critics, proving undoubtly that he was a performer for all mediums. He is survived by his wife Christina; a son, Mitchell; grandson Brandon and sister Dottie.

by Michael T. Toole
Frank Gorshin (1933-2005)

Frank Gorshin (1933-2005)

Frank Gorshin, a skilled comedian, impressionist and character actor who will forever be indentified with his role as "The Riddler" on the cult series from the '60s Batman lost his battle with lung cancer on May 17 at the Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, California. He was 72. He was born on April 5, 1933, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania into a family of modest means, his father was a railroad worker and mother a homemaker. His childhood impressions of Edward G. Robinson and James Cagney paid off when he won a local talent contest at 17, and that led to his first gig at 17 at a the prize was a one week engagement at Jackie Heller's Carousel night club, Pittsburgh's hottest downtown spot in the day. The taste was there, and after high school Frank enrolled in the Carnegie-Mellon Tech School of Drama did hone his craft. His career was interrupted briefly when he entered the US Army in 1953. He spent two years in Special Services as an entertainer. Once he got out, Frank tried his luck in Hollywood. He made his film debut in a forgettable William Holden vehicle The Proud and Profane, but his fortunes picked up soon when he and when he hooked up with American Internation Pictures (AIP). With his charasmatic sneer and cocky bravado that belied his slender, 5' 7" frame, Frank made a great punk villian in a series of entertaining "drive-in" fare: Hot Rod Girl (1956), Dragstrip Girl, Invasion of the Saucer Men, and of course the classic Portland Expose (all 1957). By the '60s, he graduated to supporting roles in bigger Hollywood fare: Where the Boys Are, Bells Are Ringing (both 1960), Ring of Fire, and his biggest tole to date, that of Iggy the bank robber in Disney's hugely popular That Darn Cat (1965). Better still, Frank found some parts on television: Naked City, Combat!, The Untouchables, and this would be the medium where he found his greatest success. Little did he realize that when his skeletal physique donned those green nylon tights and cackled his high pitch laugh that Frank Gorshin would be forever identified as "the Riddler," one of Batman's main nemisis. For two years (1966-68), he was a semi-regular on the show and it brought him deserved national attention. By the '70s, Frank made his Broadway debut, as the star of Jimmy, a musical based on the life of former New York City Mayor Jimmy Walker. He spent the next two decades alternating between the stage, where he appeared regularly in national touring productions of such popular shows as: Promises, Promises, Prisoner of Second Street, and Guys and Dolls; and nightclub work in Los Angeles and Las Vegas. He recently found himself in demand for character roles on televison: Murder, She Wrote, Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman and film: Terry Gilliam's Twelve Monkeys (1995), and the quirky comedy Man of the Century (1999). Yet his biggest triumph was his two year stint (2002-2004) as George Burns in the Broadway smash, Say Goodnight Gracie. It ran for 364 performances and he received critical raves from even the toughest New York theater critics, proving undoubtly that he was a performer for all mediums. He is survived by his wife Christina; a son, Mitchell; grandson Brandon and sister Dottie. by Michael T. Toole

Quotes

The FBI has gotten along beautifully all these years without using my room as a headquarters. Now I want Tom Swift, or whoever that is, and his electric scoreboard, or whatever that thing is, out of my room before this afternoon, or I will become very difficult, do I make myself clear?
- Ingrid Randall
Be careful Gregory, be extremely careful about what you say! I haven't had my coffee yet, and I'm in no mood for stupid, irresponsible remarks.
- Ingrid Randall
Oh.
- Gregory Benson
Gregory, I know that you're angry, but D.C.'s a cat! He can't fight his instincts. He's a hunter just like you are, only he's not stupid enough to stand in the pouring rain all day!
- Patti Randall
Hold it! Who do you think you're trying to kid? You've got a woman up there.
- Landlady
Do you think I got off the bus from Stupidsville last night?
- Landlady

Trivia

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States 1965

Released in USA on video as part of Walt Disney's Family Film Collection.

Released in United States 1965